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7 Eleven Convenience Food Stores

NEWS
August 26, 1995 | J.R. MOEHRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some nights she gets tired, so tired that she can't stand up straight, so tired that her eyes become a brilliant shade of ruby red, like the cherry juice eternally churning in the Slurpee machine. She gets tired of drunks, tired of druggies, tired of prostitutes and their pimps. She gets tired of hypochondriacs and kleptomaniacs, tired of every manic insomniac who sees her store as the last clean, well-lighted place on Earth, a way station between the weird night world and their beds.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1995 | DAVID REYES and THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Hundreds of mourners paid last respects on Thursday to Nirmal Singh, a 7-Eleven clerk who was gunned down at a La Habra store by two robbers who got away with $40. In their grief, relatives expressed anger at the Southland Corp., the Dallas-based parent company of 7-Eleven stores, and issued a list of demands for increased security, including guards, bulletproof windows and bulletproof vests for store employees. "We also want 7-Eleven stores to close between the hours of midnight to 6 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1995
The former manager of a 7-Eleven convenience store in Studio City pleaded no contest Thursday to increasing prices of food and other supplies after the Northridge earthquake. Mohiuddin (Dallas) Chowdhury admitted raising the prices of items sold at the store by more than 10% to capitalize on the needs of people affected by the Jan. 17, 1994, temblor, said Mike Qualls of the Los Angeles city attorney's office.
BUSINESS
April 19, 1994 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The parent of 7-Eleven Stores disclosed Monday that it is not terminating franchise agreements with four of eight store operators it had accused of price gouging after the Northridge earthquake. In January, Southland Corp. announced plans to cancel agreements with eight franchisees to send a signal that 7-Eleven "does not tolerate or condone" price gouging. The company's action came amid widespread complaints about gouging and was praised by lawmakers.
BUSINESS
January 22, 1994 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The parent of 7-Eleven Stores said Friday that it is terminating franchise agreements with operators of eight San Fernando Valley stores for overcharging victims of Monday's devastating quake. Dallas-based Southland Corp. said employees, which the chain sent out as undercover shoppers, were charged inflated prices for food, water, batteries and cigarettes at the stores.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1994 | KAY HWANGBO
A 7-Eleven store in Van Nuys must continue to abide by restrictions limiting its hours of operation and mandating a security guard every night, a Los Angeles zoning official decided Friday. The ruling on the store at 15317 Vanowen St. was a victory for a group of nearby residents who said the shorter hours and guard had reduced crime in the drug- and prostitute-infested area. But others lamented the lack of a convenient place to get a sandwich and sundries early in the morning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1993 | ANTHONY DUIGNAN-CABRERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the eight 7-Eleven stores destroyed in last year's riots reopened Thursday amid much fanfare, Korean-American grocers charged that they have received unfair treatment by the Los Angeles city government in their efforts to reopen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1992 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 7-Eleven market in Van Nuys is a public nuisance that fosters prostitution, drug sales, drunken-ness and lewd conduct, and the store must hire a security guard and close late at night, a Los Angeles city zoning panel ruled Tuesday. The order by the Board of Zoning Appeals to owners of the store at 15317 Vanowen St. was the second such action involving a 7-Eleven in the San Fernando Valley in recent months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1992 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 7-Eleven market in Van Nuys, cited four times for selling alcohol to minors and intoxicated customers, must curtail its hours of operation, stop selling single cans of beer and abide by 19 other conditions, Los Angeles zoning officials ruled Friday. At a zoning hearing last month, police, city officials and community groups testified that the store at 15317 Vanowen St. had become a haven for criminals, and asked that its liquor sales permit be revoked.
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