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FOOD
August 11, 2011 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times Restaurant Critic
Beneath an old diving helmet straight out of Jules Verne, a couple seated at a corner of the raw bar feed each other oysters, clams, bites of lobster. They eat slowly, luxuriously, between sips of wine. He whispers in her ear. She laughs and pops a shrimp in her mouth. Behind the bar, a cook deftly shucks oysters, tucks a little more ice around a lipstick-red lobster and slides a plate of peel 'n' eat shrimp over to a guy at the other end of the bar. This is Hungry Cat Santa Monica Canyon, the third iteration of David Lentz's wildly popular Hollywood seafood restaurant (the second is in Santa Barbara)
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WORLD
January 4, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Tens of thousands of protesters rallied across Iraq on Friday, charging that Sunni Muslims had been disenfranchised under the Shiite-led government of Prime Minister Nouri Maliki and pressing for detainees to be freed. Protests have raged for weeks and continued even after the Iraqi justice ministry freed nearly a dozen female prisoners and said it would transfer others to jails closer to their homes. The unrest has spread from Anbar province, where infuriated protesters have blocked a key highway, to other Sunni strongholds across northern and western Iraq.
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FOOD
October 14, 2011 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
Rock 'n' roll is to the Kibitz Room at Canter's what onions are to chopped liver. The two have been closely aligned since the little bar opened just off the beloved Fairfax Avenue deli's annex dining room in 1961. Only now, instead of a bunch of hippies and musicians like Frank Zappa and Jim Morrison hanging out there for the cheap booze and meaty sandwiches, you'll find a bunch of hipsters and indie rock musicians hanging out there for the cheap booze and meaty sandwiches. So things have changed, but not that much.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2012 | By L.J. Williamson
Even objectivists yearn for romance. Adherents of Ayn Rand's philosophy may strive to live with an emphasis on the power of reason and objective reality, but that didn't stop Stephanie Betit and Jamie Hancock from falling so crazy in love that they'd constantly email during work, talk on the phone until 4 a.m. and drive for nine hours to see each other. Frustrated with her love life, Vermonter Betit, a 32-year-old special-education coordinator, wondered aloud to a girlfriend, "How the heck do you meet people nowadays who are intelligent, don't do drugs, don't drink and are serious about life?"
WORLD
May 20, 2012 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
RAWALPINDI, Pakistan - Icy wind whipped Lt. Nauman Ahmed's face as he plodded up a barren expanse of snowfields and crevasses. Woozy and spent, he reached a Pakistani military outpost 20,000 feet above sea level and slumped down on a cot in one of the camp's fiberglass igloos. The next morning, the peril of waging war in the world's highest conflict zone began to take its toll. His head throbbed, and he was coughing up blood. When he tried to speak, he couldn't form words. "I thought to myself, 'What is happening to me?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2011 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
In what is said to be the largest fundraising goal in American academia to date, USC is launching a campaign to garner $5 billion in donations by 2018, on top of $1 billion given to the school in the last year. USC President C.L. Max Nikias said he was optimistic that the campaign, to be announced Sunday, would succeed despite the economic worries that even wealthy alumni may have about their investments. "Yes, we have to be mindful of the short-term economic uncertainties, but this campaign focuses beyond the next few months and next few years," Nikias said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2011 | By Martha Groves and Janet Stobart, Los Angeles Times
Nobody in wealthy Benedict Canyon can say for sure what his name is or where he's from, but the owner of a pricey 5.2-acre property on Tower Lane is fast becoming persona non grata among an exclusive club of Los Angeles homeowners. In a neighborhood whose residents include Bruce Springsteen, Jay Leno, Michael Ovitz and David Beckham, this mystery landowner is preparing to build an 85,000-square-foot family compound, fit for royalty. The proposed complex is an eclectic mix of European architecture in the coveted 90210 ZIP Code.
WORLD
July 20, 2011 | By Jonathan Kaiman, Los Angeles Times
Animal rights activists in Beijing are directing their attention away from fur farms, dog meat and zoos toward a less likely target in China: a rodeo. A coalition of 68 Chinese animal rights groups has called for the cancellation of Rodeo China, a Sino-U.S. cultural exchange event scheduled for October at the National Stadium, also known as the Bird's Nest. In a letter last month to the Chinese People's Assn. for Friendship With Foreign Countries, a government group teamed with the event's U.S. organizers, the rights groups condemned rodeo as a cruel sport that even Americans deem abusive and unpopular.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Just before 10:45 a.m., Keith Marks called 911 and the Los Angeles County emergency response system sprang into action. A fire engine, a paramedic squad and a private ambulance - eight men in total - rushed to the Martin Luther King Jr. urgent-care center in Willowbrook. When they arrived, Marks, 56, was sitting calmly in a wheelchair just outside the entrance. His complaint: he was having joint pain from gout and wanted his medication refilled. "I can't walk," he said.
BUSINESS
September 2, 2011 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
By Chinese standards, Chu Yang and Geng Chen should have had a child years ago. The married couple in their early 30s are always reminded of that by family when they return home for the spring festival holidays. "They say we're too different and that we're weird and pathetic," said Chu, who runs a trendy boutique with his wife in an aging section of Beijing filled with classical courtyard homes. But Yang and Chen have their reasons. They point to uncertainties that have accompanied China's breakneck development, including a string of food safety scandals and a deadly crash on one of the nation's showcase high-speed rail lines.
TRAVEL
August 25, 2012 | By Kari Howard, Los Angeles Times
BELFAST, Maine - The first sign says, "Slow. " Then, about 50 feet down this back road in mid-coast Maine, there's a second sign. It says, "Slower. " I ease up on the pedal. That about sums up the rhythm of life in this part of Maine, which is about as far as you can get from L.A. and still be in the same country (and sometimes it feels like another one). On this trip, I'm looking to go slower. Or maybe even go in reverse, to a bit of America that's like a half-remembered dream - to a time when books cost a dollar, dinner at the drive-in was as fast as food got and an overnight suitcase was called a "possibilities bag. " Sure, Maine has lots of fancy antiques stores and gourmet restaurants.
OPINION
July 23, 2012 | Jim Newton
There is no more consistent refrain among elected officials and candidates these days than that they will do everything they can to create jobs. It's a worthy goal given the sluggish state of the economy, and it's particularly crucial in California, which has the third-highest unemployment rate in the nation (behind Nevada and Rhode Island). But putting people to work is a lot easier to talk about than it is to do. Government budgets at all levels are tight, so any thought of launching large-scale public works projects runs up against depleted revenue; there are no Hoover Dams in the works.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2012 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
In Washington, it's called the Affordable Care Act. In Sacramento, it could be become known as another budget buster. Obamacare - as it's pugnaciously tagged by the political right - may not be affordable at all for California state government. Soon after the federal healthcare act was passed by Congress in 2010, the Schwarzenegger administration in Sacramento calculated a state price tag of up to $2.65 billion annually. The Brown administration has torn up that price tag, but doesn't have a new one. They're working on it, "trying to be much more precise," says Len Finocchio, associate director of the Department of Health Care Services.
TRAVEL
July 8, 2012 | By Ryan Ritchie
The 51st state. The closer you get to the Oregon border along the 5 Freeway, you begin to see signs announcing the State of Jefferson. After a quick Internet search, you discover that this is a grass-roots movement begun in 1941 to create a state composed of counties from Northern California and southern Oregon. The capital of the proposed region is Yreka, a mining town with a population of about 8,000. With Western-style architecture and turn-of-the-last-century homes, Yreka is more than just a place to sleep on those long drives to the Pacific Northwest.
WORLD
July 7, 2012 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan - War is an ageless poetic wellspring, yielding wrenching odes to the white heat of combat, the longing for lost loved ones, the dust of graveyards. Now a controversial new anthology unveils a collection of seldom-heard voices: those of Taliban fighters. Denounced by some as propaganda by the enemy in America's longest war, hailed by others as a rare window on a largely hidden world, the verse assembled in "Poetry of the Taliban" is by turns bombastic and introspective, dark and mirthful, ugly and lyrical - and perhaps above all, surprising in its unabashedly emotional tone.
SCIENCE
June 23, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
NASA led the way for Americans in space, but now the U.S. space agency is actively encouraging companies to take over primary responsibility for getting in and out of Earth's orbit. Last month, a capsule built and operated by SpaceX completed a nine-day cargo-hauling mission to the International Space Station, becoming the first private-sector spacecraft to make such a journey. But it won't be the last. Ed Mango, manager of NASA's Commercial Crew Program, is charged with helping companies develop vehicles that could ferry astronauts - and eventually, perhaps, civilians - on routine trips to space.
TRAVEL
July 8, 2012 | By Ryan Ritchie
The 51st state. The closer you get to the Oregon border along the 5 Freeway, you begin to see signs announcing the State of Jefferson. After a quick Internet search, you discover that this is a grass-roots movement begun in 1941 to create a state composed of counties from Northern California and southern Oregon. The capital of the proposed region is Yreka, a mining town with a population of about 8,000. With Western-style architecture and turn-of-the-last-century homes, Yreka is more than just a place to sleep on those long drives to the Pacific Northwest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2011 | By Ann M. Simmons, Los Angeles Times
The builder of an unusual home expansion in the Antelope Valley called Phonehenge West was found guilty Tuesday of violating building codes, and a judge's order to tear down the structure is expected. Alan Kimble Fahey was charged with 14 misdemeanor counts, including maintenance of non-permitted properties and unlawful use of land. Jurors in Los Angeles County Superior Court in Lancaster reached a partial verdict, covering nine of the counts; they were expected to continue deliberating the remaining counts Wednesday in the courtroom of Judge Daviann L. Mitchell.
BUSINESS
June 20, 2012 | By Chad Terhune, Anna Gorman and Erin Loury, Los Angeles Times
If the Supreme Court scraps the Affordable Care Act in the coming days, California will lose out on as much as $15 billion annually in new federal money slated to come its way, dealing what state officials say would be a critical blow to efforts to expand coverage to the poor and uninsured. The state is one of the biggest beneficiaries of the federal healthcare law because of its large number of uninsured residents - about 7 million people, or nearly 20% of California's population.
WORLD
June 17, 2012 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
GAZA CITY - Just a couple of years ago, the prevailing wisdom about Hamas was that its Gaza Strip-based leaders were forced to be more moderate because they bore the brunt of economic boycotts and military clashes with Israel. Exiled Hamas bosses living in the relative comfort of Damascus, however, could afford to take a tougher stance. But the "Arab Spring" has turned the equation on its head, with longtime hard-liners who had resided in relative comfort in Syria adopting a more conciliatory tone as they scramble for safe haven - and leaders in Gaza emboldened by the rise in neighboring Egypt of the Muslim Brotherhood, which helped create the Palestinian militant group in the late 1980s.
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