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March 25, 1990 | LOIS GIBSON, Gibson is a Malibu free-lance writer.
"Have nothing in your house that you do not know to be useful or believe to be beautiful," wrote 19th-Century tastemaker William Morris. This good advice was easier to follow when labor was cheap. Today's homeowner--eager to restore an old house, add distinction to a bland one or create a neoclassic--soon learns that period architectural details are hard to find and cost a small fortune to duplicate.
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BUSINESS
March 19, 2014 | By Dominic Gates
SEATTLE - A review of crucial systems on Boeing's 787 Dreamliner ordered immediately after two serious 787 battery failures in January 2013 has concluded that the jetliner is safe, meets design standards and is about as reliable as other Boeing aircraft were after being introduced, according to a final report published Wednesday. The review, conducted by Federal Aviation Administration and Boeing Co. technical experts, also validates the oversight role played by the regulatory agency, concluding that "the FAA had effective processes in place to identify and correct issues.
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BUSINESS
June 24, 2009 | Julie Johnsson
Boeing Co. said Tuesday that its star-crossed 787 Dreamliner had another setback that will again delay its first flight and first delivery. The Dreamliner, already running about two years late, was due to take wing by next week. However, those plans are on hold after Chicago-based Boeing discovered in testing the aircraft's structure last month that it needed to reinforce areas where the wings are joined with the main fuselage.
BUSINESS
November 26, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
The Federal Aviation Administration plans to issue a warning to airlines flying certain Boeing Co. 787 Dreamliners and 747-8 jumbo jets, advising that they avoid high-altitude thunderstorms after instances of icing. The anticipated move comes after Boeing notified airlines last week that the planes, outfitted with the GEnx engine made by General Electric Co., could have icing problems if they flew close to the storms. The warning is an “interim action to make sure pilots avoid icing conditions that could affect engine power and possibly damage the engine,” the FAA said.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Boeing Co. investors have enjoyed a surge in the aircraft maker's shares as it has racked up orders for the new 787 Dreamliner. Whether the ride continues may hinge more on engineers and mechanics than salespeople. Boeing has orders for 584 of the planes, all that it can make through 2013, and plans to announce more contracts at this week's Paris Air Show. Demand has been helped by production delays on rival Airbus' jumbo A380 and customer rejection of several designs for its planned A350 XWB.
BUSINESS
October 29, 2006
Although I certainly agree with David Ohman about the fate of the Airbus A380 and the use of taxpayer money to fund the airport improvements to accommodate that monster, the Boeing 787 Dreamliner is not a replacement for the 747 (Letters, Oct. 22). The 787 and 747 are not in any way equivalent aircraft. The 747 weighs about 800,000 pounds plus takeoff weight and will carry more than 400 passengers. The 787 Dreamliner is about one third of that, though the 787 has a much greater range of flight.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Delays in Boeing Co.'s 787 program have given the company extra time to fine-tune the plane's electronics and other systems, lowering the risk that it will encounter problems during flight testing, the head of its commercial jet division said. Speaking in New York at an aerospace and defense conference, Scott Carson said Boeing had "great confidence that the airplane will be ready to go as we've scheduled it."
BUSINESS
May 9, 2005 | Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer
Since the dawn of the Jet Age, designers have built aircraft chiefly from sheets of aluminum. Now Boeing Co. is betting its future by designing a plane primarily around thin layers of carbon fibers to dramatically cut weight and to save fuel costs. These composite materials are the key to Boeing's lofty plans for its 787 Dreamliner jet. If the design works as planned, analysts say, composites will revolutionize aircraft as dramatically as the industry's shift from wood to metal 80 years ago.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2006 | From Reuters
Boeing Co. has decided to proceed with an expanded version of its hot-selling 787 Dreamliner, the executive who heads the program said Monday. The twin-engine jet, due to enter service with airlines in 2008, helped spark a rebound in Boeing's commercial airliner business last year. Boeing had been reluctant to commit to making a larger 787, which would seat about 300 passengers in three classes, because of concern it would cut into sales of its 777-200 ER.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Boeing Co. said Tuesday that it was still working through "wrinkles" in the supply chain for its new 787 Dreamliner and hoped to deliver the first aircraft in late 2008. There are still "significant supply-chain wrinkles," said Scott Carson, chief of Boeing's commercial airplane group. Parts shortages are declining and there's greater availability of fasteners needed to assemble the aircraft, Chicago-based Boeing said.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
Aerospace giant Boeing Co. posted a larger-than-expected 13% jump in second-quarter profit that was driven by higher deliveries of passenger jets. But in a conference call with analysts, Boeing Chief Executive James McNerney warned that federal money held back under sequestration budget cuts could have consequences in the future on its defense, space and security business unit, which is spread throughout Southern California. "We've seen some impact of sequestration, but we have not begun to see most of it yet," McNerney said.
BUSINESS
July 19, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
The Federal Aviation Administration is developing a plan requiring airlines to inspect the emergency devices on their Boeing 787 Dreamliners after a fire erupted on the plane last week while it was parked at London's Heathrow Airport. On Friday the agency said these mandatory inspections “would ask operators to inspect for proper wire routing and any signs of wire damage or pinching, as well as inspect the battery compartment for unusual signs of heating or moisture.” The FAA plan is not expected to ground the worldwide 787 fleet, as happened earlier this year.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
A Boeing Co. 787 Dreamliner operated by Japan Airlines had to return to Boston's Logan International Airport after an indicator light came on in the cockpit. Japan Airlines Co. Flight 7 was bound for Tokyo, but instead made a U-turn over Canada and landed in Boston. “As a standard precautionary measure due to a maintenance message -- fuel pump indicator -- JL007 bound for Tokyo-Narita is returning to Boston Logan for check,” airline spokeswoman Carol Anderson said. FULL COVERAGE: Boeing's troubled Dreamliner The Federal Aviation Administration said the 787 circled in the vicinity of the airport to burn off fuel before landing.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
British accident investigators determined that an emergency device was probably responsible for the fire that broke out last week on an empty Boeing Co. 787 Dreamliner parked at London's Heathrow Airport and advised airlines to disable it on all planes. In addition, Britain's Air Accidents Investigation Branch issued a “special bulletin” Thursday urging U.S. regulators to conduct an extensive safety review. The Federal Aviation Administration will now have to decide what to do about the device, which is installed on the worldwide problem-plagued 787 fleet and thousands of other commercial airplanes.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
One of Boeing Co.'s major suppliers for its 787 Dreamliner passenger jet will help determine if its emergency device played any part in a fire that broke out last week on an empty aircraft parked at London's Heathrow Airport. Honeywell International Inc., maker of the plane's emergency locater transmitter, joined Britain's Air Accidents Investigation Branch in the probe, along with the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board, the Federal Aviation Administration and Boeing. The transmitter, installed on commercial airplanes, emits signals to emergency crews in crisis situations.
BUSINESS
July 12, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
Just as Boeing Co. and its 787 Dreamliner looked to be taking off again, another fire onboard the signature new passenger jet has brought the resurgence to a halt. A 787 - one of 68 delivered so far by Boeing - that had been sitting at a remote parking stand for more than eight hours at London's Heathrow Airport caught fire Friday. No one was onboard the Ethiopian Airlines plane and no one was injured, the airline and an airport spokeswoman said. Boeing shares swerved on the news, falling as much as 7% before rebounding slightly to close down 5%, or $5.01, at $101.87 as analysts said the incident didn't appear related to the battery troubles that grounded 787s worldwide earlier this year.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Boeing Co. pushed back its oft-delayed 787 jetliner by another six months Wednesday, postponing the jet's debut in commercial service until the third quarter of 2009, further jolting the company's credibility and likely costing it billions of dollars in additional costs and penalties.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2012
Boeing Co. said Monday that repairs are needed in the tail sections of some of its new 787s, although it said there's no immediate safety concern. Boeing has delivered five of the planes since September to Japan's All Nippon Airways. It has built dozens more, including many that need to be reworked to fix various manufacturing issues. A Boeing spokeswoman said Monday that inspections were underway to determine which planes need the latest repairs, including the planes that have gone to All Nippon.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
Aerospace giant Boeing Co. launched the stretched version of its 787 Dreamliner passenger jet Tuesday at the Paris Air Show, saying it received customer commitments for 102 airplanes. The new plane, called the 787-10, will fly up to 8,055 miles with seating for 300 to 330 passengers. Boeing said that it can cover more than 90% of the world's twin-aisle routes between major cities. PHOTOS: 50th International Paris Air Show The new orders from five international customers represents an order sheet worth more than $29 billion at list prices.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
Aerospace giant Boeing Co. has finished replacing the problem-plagued lithium-ion battery systems in its new 787 Dreamliner jets after overheating incidents grounded the planes for more than three months around the world. The Chicago company delivered 50 of the planes to eight airlines before the grounding order kept them on the tarmac from mid-January until late last month. The 787s that were already built had to be retrofitted with the new design, which involved insulating and spacing out parts in the battery unit and enclosing the system in stainless-steel cases so that little oxygen can get at them.
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