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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2011 | Randy Lewis
When singer Roy Orbison was touring England in 1968, it had been four years since he last appeared at the top of the charts with "Oh, Pretty Woman," even though he continued playing live and recording long after the pulse of rock music shifted away from his signature brand of sweepingly operatic pop. At a show in Leeds on that tour, he met 18-year-old German fan Barbara Ann Marie Wellhoener Jakobs, and within a year the two were married....
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Christopher Hawthorne
In the 1970s, architecture faced an identity crisis. A lacerating critique of modern architecture's overreach, especially in remaking wide swaths of cities, had left the profession's 20th-century heroes - Le Corbusier, Mies Van der Rohe, even Frank Lloyd Wright - without many prominent defenders. But what would take modernism's place? What could architecture do with the rubble of that once dominant movement? Hans Hollein, the Austrian architect who died Thursday in Vienna at 80, according to a family spokeswoman cited by the Associated Press, was among those who provided convincing early answers to those questions.
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NEWS
December 3, 1990 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Cummings, the perennially youthful bachelor photographer of the 1950s television series "The Bob Cummings Show," died Sunday at the Motion Picture and Television Hospital in Woodland Hills. Cummings, 80, died of kidney failure and complications of pneumonia, hospital spokeswoman Louella Benson said. The actor, who also was in advanced stages of Parkinson's Disease, was admitted to the hospital Nov. 18.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Nardine Saad
Heather Graham - she of Rollergirl fame - is the latest actress to call out Hollywood on its sexism. "Girls" wunderkind Lena Dunham and Oscar winner Cate Blanchett have also made statements on the topic of sexism recently, with the former addressing it in a SXSW panel and the latter bringing it up during her Oscars acceptance speech in March. The "Boogie Nights" star made her fiery statements during a recent Q&A with Esquire magazine that surveyed the actress' characters as of late - roles that cast her as the perennial "sexy mother" in films such as "The Hangover" trilogy (she was in the first and third installments)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1997 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two and a half years after Delores Jackson drowned in his swimming pool, businessman Donald Bohana pleaded not guilty Wednesday to her murder and was ordered held in lieu of $1-million bail. A short bail hearing in Los Angeles Superior Court depicted Bohana as a 60-year-old businessman with widespread contacts, a pilot's license--and more than $4 million in debts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1999 | CECILIA RASMUSSEN
The annals of child kidnapping are replete with heartbreaking tragedies, but probably none have been quite as bizarre as the crime that first mesmerized, then convulsed, Los Angeles more than 70 years ago. By the time it was over, it would involve not only an apparent abduction, but also impersonation, police coercion, false imprisonment, psychiatric abuse and--this being Los Angeles--a court fight that stretched on for more than a decade.
NEWS
January 12, 1996 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pop diva Janet Jackson is expected to sign a four-album contract today with Virgin Records worth an estimated $80 million--an unprecedented fee that analysts say could set the stage for another round of music industry mega-deals. The pact is the biggest ever awarded, surpassing the $60-million mark shared by such superstars as Michael Jackson and Madonna, whose six-album deals included film and joint-venture record label components.
BUSINESS
March 2, 1988 | JESUS SANCHEZ and MARTHA GROVES, Times Staff Writers
Boys Markets--the 54-store Los Angeles supermarket chain built on catering to Southern California's burgeoning minority communities--said Tuesday that it has received a $130.7-million takeover offer, reportedly from a wealthy Mexican family. The announcement comes as the Los Angeles supermarket industry is being shaken by a round of takeovers and mergers.
BUSINESS
June 3, 2007 | David Colker, Times Staff Writer
We'll repair your credit, guaranteed! Correct negative information on your reports! Excellent for late payments! -- Credit repair companies, which are rampant on the Internet, appear to be providing a wonderful service. Just imagine -- negative items on your credit report could be wiped out with only a few easy payments. Keep imagining.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1999 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Drew Birtness, the last straw came when he realized he was arresting the grandchildren of suspects he had picked up years ago. The Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy had been working the streets of East Los Angeles for 21 years, long enough to be hardened by the shootings and deaths and gangs--but also long enough to try something new. "I was tired of picking up kids' bodies off the street," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Amy Reiter
With Sam Woolf back in the fold this week after last week's save, the "American Idol" top eight tackled songs of the '80s, a decade in which none of them -- nope, not one --  was actually alive. If that fact alone doesn't make "Idol" watchers over age 24 feel old, Caleb Johnson added an extra insult before stepping onto the stage to sing Journey's "Faithfully," a song guest mentor and Season 7 "Idol" winner David Cook encouraged him to approach with "reverence. "  Johnson said he planned to go out there and "make some old ladies cry. " (I trust he wasn't referring to the likes of Jennifer Lopez, who did seem moved by Johnson's performance.)
SPORTS
April 10, 2014 | By Teddy Greenstein and Dan Wiederer
AUGUSTA, Ga. - Craig and Kevin Stadler ("Walrus" and "Smallrus") became the first father-son combo to play in the same Masters, but perhaps they're not the first family of this week's festivities. Check out the Haas household. Bill Haas overcome a first-hole bogey Thursday to shoot a four-under-par 68, good for the first-round lead. Father Jay Haas played in 22 Masters, making 19 cuts. Uncle Jerry Haas participated in 1985. An uncle from his mother's side, Dillard Pruitt, teed it up here in 1992 and '93. Oh, and great-uncle Bob Goalby won the 1968 event, avoiding a playoff after Argentina's Roberto De Vicenzo signed for the wrong Sunday score.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | By Robert J. Lopez
Temperatures hit the 80s and 90s across Southern California on Tuesday as high pressure brought summer-like weather to the region, but a cool down was expected to begin during the next several days, according to forecasters. A record high for the day of 92 degrees was set at Long Beach Airport. That topped by three degrees a record set in 1968, according to the National Weather Service. San Diego reached 87 degrees, breaking a daily record of 82 degres set in 1885, the Weather Service said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Joel Rubin
Los Angeles police officers tampered with voice recording equipment in dozens of patrol cars in an effort to avoid being monitored while on duty, according to records and interviews. An inspection by Los Angeles Police Department investigators found about half of the estimated 80 cars in one South L.A. patrol division were missing antennas, which help capture what officers say in the field. The antennas in at least 10 more cars in nearby divisions had also been removed. LAPD Chief Charlie Beck and other top officials learned of the problem last summer but chose not to investigate which officers were responsible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2014 | E. Scott Reckard
Willful and self-assured, Charles H. Keating Jr. strode through a life of outsized public roles -- anti-pornography crusader, luxury hotel developer, political kingmaker -- on his way to becoming one of the nation's most notorious corporate rogues. The harshest spotlight arrived in 1989 when regulators seized his Lincoln Savings & Loan after years of battles. The failure of the Irvine thrift, which had bankrolled Keating's high-rolling investments, cost the government $3.1 billion, then the costliest bank collapse in U.S. history.
BUSINESS
April 1, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - They're finally answering phones at California's beleaguered unemployment benefits agency. Four months ago, 9 out of 10 callers couldn't reach a live staffer at the Employment Development Department, according to official call logs. The system still was robotically hanging up on 80% of frustrated callers as recently as mid-February. But in March, EDD phone staffers suddenly picked up the pace, responding to a Feb. 7 call for action from the administration of Gov. Jerry Brown.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1991 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jermaine Jackson says he took a biting musical swipe at his superstar sibling, Michael, because his younger brother had frozen him out of his life. In an interview, Jermaine explained that the cantankerous lyrics to his song "Word to the Badd!!," which criticize Michael for allegedly changing his skin color and obtaining plastic surgery, were written in retaliation for eight months of unreturned phone calls.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1993 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
When they converged in San Francisco about 45 years ago, Wolfgang Paalen, Gordon Onslow Ford and Lee Mullican wanted nothing less than to be image makers of cosmic freedom. The purpose of art, they thought, was self-transcending awareness.
WORLD
April 1, 2014 | Times Staff and Wire Reports, This post has been updated to reflect recent developments.
SANTIAGO, Chile - A powerful earthquake has struck in the Pacific off Chile's northern region, and authorities have ordered an evacuation of coastal areas in case of a tsunami. There are no immediate reports of injuries or damage. The U.S. Geological Survey says the quake had a preliminary magnitude of 8.0 and struck 61 miles (99 kilometers) northwest of Iquique, Chile, at 8:46 p.m. It hit in an area that has been rocked by numerous quakes over the past two weeks. The latest tremor shook buildings in parts of the nearby nations of Bolivia and Peru.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2014 | By Steve Chawkins
Hobie Alter, who shaped Southern California's signature surf culture by pioneering the mass-produced foam surfboard and later popularized sailing by inventing a lightweight, high-performance catamaran, died Saturday at his home in Palm Desert. He was 80. The announcement of Alter's death was posted on www.hobie.com , his company's website. No cause was disclosed. Full obituary: Hobie Alter dies at 80 A self-taught design innovator and entrepreneur whose “Hobie” brand earned him a fortune, Alter was nonetheless a reluctant businessman who eschewed suits for cutoffs and was guided by his imagination above all else.
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