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800 Telephone Services Industry

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BUSINESS
July 17, 1995 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
For everyone from mom-and-pop businesses seeking to boost sales outside their area to moms and pops hoping to encourage junior to phone home from college, toll-free 800 numbers have suddenly become the hottest digits around. 800 numbers are everywhere, propelled by a Federal Communications Commission decision in 1993 to open them up to competition by letting users take their 800 numbers with them when they switch long-distance carriers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2000 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS
L.A.'s not known for being a taxi-taking town. But a Van Nuys-based start-up is hoping to use Los Angeles as the home base for a nationwide network of taxicabs, operated by a zillion different franchise holders but linked by the catchy handle 1-800-Taxicab. The concept is simple: You're in Austin or Atlanta on a sultry summer day. Wearing a suit. Walking. Sweating. Boy, would it be nice if you could catch a cab. But this is not New York. So you can't just lift your arm and yell "Taxi!"
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1995 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even though Orange County is one of the largest Republican strongholds in the nation, leaders of arts groups here say they do not fear asking their supporters to go to bat on behalf of the National Endowment for the Arts. No local arts administrators contacted this week had begun efforts to take part in a national call-in campaign to "advocate for federal funding for the arts and humanities." Callers to the Cultural Advocacy Campaign Hot Line--(800) 651-1575--pay $9.
BUSINESS
December 3, 1997 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A coalition of companies and organizations that rely on toll-free phone numbers has asked the Federal Communications Commission to reduce the fee that pay-phone operators can charge for connecting 800 and 888 calls. Companies that operate pay phones charge long-distance companies 28.4 cents for each toll-free call they connect. The pay-phone operators say the charges are needed to reimburse them for the cost of operating the phones, which normally nets them 35 cents per call.
BUSINESS
January 5, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
AT&T, MCI Settle Dispute Over Phone Number Information: Under the accord, Washington-based MCI will change the way it bills for its fledgling long-distance directory service, which enables consumers to call a single 800 phone number and get domestic or international directory assistance for $0.75. MCI now will either bill the credit cards of callers to the service or set up a billing arrangement in advance.
BUSINESS
December 3, 1997 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A coalition of companies and organizations that rely on toll-free phone numbers has asked the Federal Communications Commission to reduce the fee that pay-phone operators can charge for connecting 800 and 888 calls. Companies that operate pay phones charge long-distance companies 28.4 cents for each toll-free call they connect. The pay-phone operators say the charges are needed to reimburse them for the cost of operating the phones, which normally nets them 35 cents per call.
BUSINESS
February 8, 1993 | From Reuter
In a finding that could clip American Telephone & Telegraph Co.'s dominance in the toll-free 800 number business, an independent survey has found 46% of large corporations might switch 800 carriers. The companies "are actively considering switching carriers when portability becomes a reality," according to Strategic TeleMedia's poll of telecommunications managers at Fortune 1000 companies.
NEWS
November 24, 1992 | By a Times Staff Writer
Former Gov. Edmund G. (Jerry) Brown's famed 800 telephone number was sabotaged by someone who impersonated Brown in recording an outgoing message that identified his political reform group as "a white supremacy movement." The prank was discovered Monday morning by an unidentified caller to the Brown number who notified The Times. When advised of the message and its content, Brown said: "I'll check into it." He guessed that the message was inserted over the weekend.
BUSINESS
August 3, 1994 | From Associated Press
Federal regulators took the first step Tuesday toward preventing consumers from being wrongly billed for calls to information services. The Federal Communications Commission unveiled a plan to stem the abuses after receiving 2,000 complaints in the first six months of this year involving such charges, mostly for adult-oriented services carried on 800 numbers, said Richard Metzger, deputy chief of the FCC's Common Carrier Bureau.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1993 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Homeless people don't have answering machines. That obvious but ordinarily irrelevant truth began to matter to Dan Sandel when hundreds of people called his Chatsworth factory eager to take him up on his offer of a job and virtually free place to live. "It was very frustrating," Sandel said. "One guy called three times from downtown, and it probably cost him a buck a call. We had no way to reach him, and he finally gave up." But Sandel didn't.
NEWS
February 7, 1997 | JUBE SHIVER Jr. and KAREN KAPLAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Many of the world's largest telephone carriers will launch a new system of global toll-free numbers this spring that could transform the way Californians and other Americans travel and conduct business around the world. The new telephone numbers--which sport an "800" prefix like the 3-decade-old version in the United States and Canada but with eight digits that follow--are intended to provide toll-free calling between countries rather than within a country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1995 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even the coroner's vans now have them. They are those ubiquitous "How Am I Driving?" signs on the back of commercial vehicles from 18-wheelers to delivery vans. Does anybody ever call? "Calls have increased dramatically as car phones have proliferated," said Alex Crawford, executive vice president of Driver Check International, which fields about 5,000 calls a month for trucking companies. "Our phones really ring off the hook these days." Callers report dangerous and discourteous drivers.
BUSINESS
July 17, 1995 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
For everyone from mom-and-pop businesses seeking to boost sales outside their area to moms and pops hoping to encourage junior to phone home from college, toll-free 800 numbers have suddenly become the hottest digits around. 800 numbers are everywhere, propelled by a Federal Communications Commission decision in 1993 to open them up to competition by letting users take their 800 numbers with them when they switch long-distance carriers.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1995 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even though Orange County is one of the largest Republican strongholds in the nation, leaders of arts groups here say they do not fear asking their supporters to go to bat on behalf of the National Endowment for the Arts. No local arts administrators contacted this week had begun efforts to take part in a national call-in campaign to "advocate for federal funding for the arts and humanities." Callers to the Cultural Advocacy Campaign Hot Line--(800) 651-1575--pay $9.
BUSINESS
January 5, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
AT&T, MCI Settle Dispute Over Phone Number Information: Under the accord, Washington-based MCI will change the way it bills for its fledgling long-distance directory service, which enables consumers to call a single 800 phone number and get domestic or international directory assistance for $0.75. MCI now will either bill the credit cards of callers to the service or set up a billing arrangement in advance.
BUSINESS
August 3, 1994 | From Associated Press
Federal regulators took the first step Tuesday toward preventing consumers from being wrongly billed for calls to information services. The Federal Communications Commission unveiled a plan to stem the abuses after receiving 2,000 complaints in the first six months of this year involving such charges, mostly for adult-oriented services carried on 800 numbers, said Richard Metzger, deputy chief of the FCC's Common Carrier Bureau.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1995 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even the coroner's vans now have them. They are those ubiquitous "How Am I Driving?" signs on the back of commercial vehicles from 18-wheelers to delivery vans. Does anybody ever call? "Calls have increased dramatically as car phones have proliferated," said Alex Crawford, executive vice president of Driver Check International, which fields about 5,000 calls a month for trucking companies. "Our phones really ring off the hook these days." Callers report dangerous and discourteous drivers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1993 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Homeless people don't have answering machines. That obvious but ordinarily irrelevant truth began to matter to Dan Sandel when hundreds of people called his Chatsworth factory eager to take him up on his offer of a job and virtually free place to live. "It was very frustrating," Sandel said. "One guy called three times from downtown, and it probably cost him a buck a call. We had no way to reach him, and he finally gave up." But Sandel didn't.
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