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800 Telephone Services Industry

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1995 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even the coroner's vans now have them. They are those ubiquitous "How Am I Driving?" signs on the back of commercial vehicles from 18-wheelers to delivery vans. Does anybody ever call? "Calls have increased dramatically as car phones have proliferated," said Alex Crawford, executive vice president of Driver Check International, which fields about 5,000 calls a month for trucking companies. "Our phones really ring off the hook these days." Callers report dangerous and discourteous drivers.
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BUSINESS
July 17, 1995 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
For everyone from mom-and-pop businesses seeking to boost sales outside their area to moms and pops hoping to encourage junior to phone home from college, toll-free 800 numbers have suddenly become the hottest digits around. 800 numbers are everywhere, propelled by a Federal Communications Commission decision in 1993 to open them up to competition by letting users take their 800 numbers with them when they switch long-distance carriers.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1995 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even though Orange County is one of the largest Republican strongholds in the nation, leaders of arts groups here say they do not fear asking their supporters to go to bat on behalf of the National Endowment for the Arts. No local arts administrators contacted this week had begun efforts to take part in a national call-in campaign to "advocate for federal funding for the arts and humanities." Callers to the Cultural Advocacy Campaign Hot Line--(800) 651-1575--pay $9.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1995 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County arts director Laura Zucker got her call-to-arms last week via fax machine. She then called Kristen Madsen, president of the California Assembly of Local Arts Agencies, to tell her about it--only to find that Madsen already had the same fax.
BUSINESS
August 3, 1994 | From Associated Press
Federal regulators took the first step Tuesday toward preventing consumers from being wrongly billed for calls to information services. The Federal Communications Commission unveiled a plan to stem the abuses after receiving 2,000 complaints in the first six months of this year involving such charges, mostly for adult-oriented services carried on 800 numbers, said Richard Metzger, deputy chief of the FCC's Common Carrier Bureau.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1993 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the last vestiges of the old Bell telephone system will crumble today when businesses--for the first time--will be allowed to switch long-distance carriers without losing their toll-free 800 numbers. With that in mind, long-distance carriers have stepped up efforts to compete for a greater share of the estimated $7-billion market in 800-prefix telephone lines, which have become a convenient marketing tool for industry and government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1993 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Homeless people don't have answering machines. That obvious but ordinarily irrelevant truth began to matter to Dan Sandel when hundreds of people called his Chatsworth factory eager to take him up on his offer of a job and virtually free place to live. "It was very frustrating," Sandel said. "One guy called three times from downtown, and it probably cost him a buck a call. We had no way to reach him, and he finally gave up." But Sandel didn't.
BUSINESS
February 8, 1993 | From Reuter
In a finding that could clip American Telephone & Telegraph Co.'s dominance in the toll-free 800 number business, an independent survey has found 46% of large corporations might switch 800 carriers. The companies "are actively considering switching carriers when portability becomes a reality," according to Strategic TeleMedia's poll of telecommunications managers at Fortune 1000 companies.
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