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82nd Airborne Division

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NEWS
February 24, 1990 | Associated Press
Retired Lt. Gen. James M. Gavin, one of the youngest generals in World War II, died Friday, the Pentagon said. Gavin, 82, died at a nursing home in the Baltimore area, Pentagon spokesman Maj. Bill O'Connell said. O'Connell said he had no further details. Gavin commanded the 82nd Airborne Division and jumped with the troops in several of its wartime assaults. He won his two stars as a major general when he was 37.
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NATIONAL
September 25, 2010 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
Their parachutes were rigged. Their weapons were secured. Three days of food and supplies were strapped to their bodies. In full combat gear, hundreds of paratroopers from the 82nd Airborne Division dropped from the North Carolina sky at 23 feet per second. They hit the ground hard and scrambled to their feet, rifles ready. It was only an exercise, but for paratroopers just back from Afghanistan and Iraq it was a back-to-the-future moment, part of a new training focus that looks beyond America's current counterinsurgency wars.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1991
I am an author interested in contacting members of the 82nd Airborne Division who took part in the drop in Sicily in 1943. Also anyone who recalls anything about the accidental shooting down of 82nd AB transports and the gliders of British 1st AB Division. CHARLES WHITING 11 St. Olave's Road York, England
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2010 | Sam Allen
During his breaks amid the violence and chaos of the 2003 U.S.-led invasion of Iraq, when most soldiers would rest or play video games, Nathan Cox studied Arabic. He practiced such phrases as "What do you need?" and "How can we help?" — phrases he knew would help him engage with Iraqi elders and community leaders. Cox continued to study and strive throughout his military career. By the time he arrived in Afghanistan for his fourth tour of duty earlier this year, he had been selected for the Army Special Forces, learned Farsi, and completed training to become a combat medic.
NEWS
December 20, 1990
Regarding the Nov. 8 article "The Legacy of Military--Lessons for Latinos," my grandparents had eight sons who served in World War II and Korea. One died in Bastogne, another in Germany and one was captured in Korea. I later followed. After completing community college, I enlisted in the 82nd Airborne Division. My being in the Airborne let people know that Hispanics love and are willing to fight for this country. I'm back in college, working steady and am in the Army Reserves. MANUEL ANGULO Los Angeles P.S. On Nov. 21, I was ordered with my unit to Saudi Arabia.
NATIONAL
January 20, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The first wave of returning 82nd Airborne Division soldiers arrived home after nearly a year in Iraq, where they fought during the war and then worked to maintain order in its aftermath. Spc. Keith Benoit and about 210 other members of the 325th Airborne Infantry Regiment stepped onto a landing strip adjoining Ft. Bragg, the 82nd Airborne's home. Benoit, 21, said he was looking forward to getting together with family and friends, and trying to readjust to American life. "To me, it's 180 degrees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2010
The Defense Department last week identified the following American military personnel killed in Afghanistan and Pakistan: Rusty H. Christian, 24, of Greenville, Tenn.; staff sergeant, Army. Christian died Jan. 28 in Oruzgan province, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked his unit with an improvised explosive device. He was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 1st Special Forces Group at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash. Marc P. Decoteau, 19, of Waterville Valley, N.H.; specialist, Army.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2003
The Defense Department last week also identified the following American military personnel killed in Iraq: Jarrod W. Black, 26, of Peru, Ind.; sergeant, Army. Black was killed Dec. 12 when his convoy was hit by an improvised explosive device in Ar Ramadi, Iraq. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 34th Armor Regiment, based at Ft. Riley, Kan. Jeffrey F. Braun, 19, of Stafford, Conn.; private first class, Army. Braun died Dec. 12 of a nonhostile gunshot wound in Baghdad.
NEWS
September 19, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First came cheers, then an uncertain silence. In anxious barracks and day rooms at the base for the military units that would have borne the brunt of an invasion of Haiti, officers and enlisted personnel watched President Clinton's speech Sunday night to learn what their future would be. When Clinton singled out Ft. Bragg and the 82nd Airborne Division for praise, the headquarters of the 327th Battalion of the 35th Signal Corps here erupted with cheers and youthful woofing.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Featherweight drones, one of the newest weapons in the nation's arsenal, are among the sophisticated weapons technology being shipped to the Middle East for possible use in aerial surveillance of opposing forces, officials said Thursday. The nine-pound planes--dubbed unmanned aerial vehicles--were requested by the recently deployed 82nd Airborne Division and are scheduled to depart with the "second wave" headed to Saudi Arabia, sources said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2010
The Defense Department last week identified the following American military personnel killed in Afghanistan and Pakistan: Rusty H. Christian, 24, of Greenville, Tenn.; staff sergeant, Army. Christian died Jan. 28 in Oruzgan province, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked his unit with an improvised explosive device. He was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 1st Special Forces Group at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash. Marc P. Decoteau, 19, of Waterville Valley, N.H.; specialist, Army.
WORLD
January 15, 2010 | By Julian E. Barnes
Top Pentagon officials said the U.S. responded to the Haiti earthquake as quickly as it could, and promised that as many as 10,000 American troops would be in-country and off-shore by the weekend. Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said that he anticipated that U.S. ground forces, including soldiers from the 82nd Airborne Division and the Marine Corps, would take a key role in helping distribute relief supplies quickly. U.N. forces, led by Brazil, will take the lead in security.
NATIONAL
April 14, 2006 | Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writer
The White House voiced support for Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld on Thursday even as the ranks of retired senior generals calling for his resignation grew. Retired Army Maj. Gen. Charles H. Swannack Jr., who commanded the 82nd Airborne Division in Iraq shortly after the toppling of Saddam Hussein, became the fifth general involved in Iraq policy to call for Rumsfeld to resign, citing his handling of the war. Swannack, like the other generals, criticized Rumsfeld's management style.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2004 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
The event Saturday night was a farewell for Marines being deployed to bring peace to one of the most dangerous cities in the world, but it had the outward appearance of family night at the local school. Classroom lights burned brightly, tables outside the buildings were stacked with cookies and other snacks, families wandered inside and out, music played softly on a boom box (some rock, some country), and large groups of students were everywhere -- some quiet, some nervously talky.
NATIONAL
January 20, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The first wave of returning 82nd Airborne Division soldiers arrived home after nearly a year in Iraq, where they fought during the war and then worked to maintain order in its aftermath. Spc. Keith Benoit and about 210 other members of the 325th Airborne Infantry Regiment stepped onto a landing strip adjoining Ft. Bragg, the 82nd Airborne's home. Benoit, 21, said he was looking forward to getting together with family and friends, and trying to readjust to American life. "To me, it's 180 degrees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2003
The Defense Department last week also identified the following American military personnel killed in Iraq: Jarrod W. Black, 26, of Peru, Ind.; sergeant, Army. Black was killed Dec. 12 when his convoy was hit by an improvised explosive device in Ar Ramadi, Iraq. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 34th Armor Regiment, based at Ft. Riley, Kan. Jeffrey F. Braun, 19, of Stafford, Conn.; private first class, Army. Braun died Dec. 12 of a nonhostile gunshot wound in Baghdad.
WORLD
January 15, 2010 | By Julian E. Barnes
Top Pentagon officials said the U.S. responded to the Haiti earthquake as quickly as it could, and promised that as many as 10,000 American troops would be in-country and off-shore by the weekend. Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said that he anticipated that U.S. ground forces, including soldiers from the 82nd Airborne Division and the Marine Corps, would take a key role in helping distribute relief supplies quickly. U.N. forces, led by Brazil, will take the lead in security.
NATIONAL
September 25, 2010 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
Their parachutes were rigged. Their weapons were secured. Three days of food and supplies were strapped to their bodies. In full combat gear, hundreds of paratroopers from the 82nd Airborne Division dropped from the North Carolina sky at 23 feet per second. They hit the ground hard and scrambled to their feet, rifles ready. It was only an exercise, but for paratroopers just back from Afghanistan and Iraq it was a back-to-the-future moment, part of a new training focus that looks beyond America's current counterinsurgency wars.
NEWS
August 30, 1998 | JIM STRADER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
As hundreds of paratroopers jumped from a hazy morning sky, Edward Whalen recalled the night he parachuted into France and landed amid startled Germans, hours before the D-Day beach assault. "I got hooked up in a tree and a guy was shooting at me--about 3 feet over my head," the 81-year-old veteran of the 82nd Airborne Division said. "Then he ran away. They got scared too."
NEWS
September 19, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First came cheers, then an uncertain silence. In anxious barracks and day rooms at the base for the military units that would have borne the brunt of an invasion of Haiti, officers and enlisted personnel watched President Clinton's speech Sunday night to learn what their future would be. When Clinton singled out Ft. Bragg and the 82nd Airborne Division for praise, the headquarters of the 327th Battalion of the 35th Signal Corps here erupted with cheers and youthful woofing.
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