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February 24, 1995 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Greg Louganis hit his head on the diving board and spilled his blood into the pool at the 1988 Olympic Games, did he have an obligation to disclose to doctors who treated him and to other athletes using the pool that he was HIV-positive?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2014
Tony Benn Renounced title to stay in House of Commons Tony Benn, 88, a committed British socialist who irritated and fascinated Britons through a political career spanning more than five decades and who renounced his aristocratic title rather than leave the House of Commons, died March 14 at his home in west London, his family said in a statement. No cause was given. Benn held cabinet posts in Labour Party governments in the 1970s and clung unswervingly to his leftist beliefs while his party, in opposition, moved to the center and reemerged to take power again as New Labour.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1993 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Menendez family estate, once valued at up to $14 million, is virtually depleted, it was disclosed Tuesday at Lyle and Erik Menendez's murder trial. Shrunken by taxes, legal fees and other costs, Jose and Kitty Menendez's estate is worth no more than $800,000--and has debts at least that high, defense lawyer Leslie Abramson said in court. Probate records are sealed and the defense had kept financial figures secret throughout the trial.
NATIONAL
March 19, 2014 | By Maria L. La Ganga
LOS OSOS, Calif. - He led an active electronic life, so the cyber silence was ominous. No emails. No posts to any of the thousand-plus friends on Facebook. When word finally surfaced, it wasn't from him. "If you have noticed Jim's absence from Facebook, there is a reason. He has been doing poorly for a week or so ... and yesterday they detected a mass in his brain. Having elected to have no extraordinary medical measures, he is at home in Los Osos and we are waiting for hospice to come.
SPORTS
October 16, 1990 | THERESA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
National swim team coaches from the United States, Hong Kong and Australia suspect the Chinese women's team of using steroids in the wake of China's world-best performances during last month's Asian Games. Richard Quick, coach of the U.S. national team and Stanford women's team, said he felt obligated to speak out after the Chinese produced three times that rank No. 1 in the world this year and three others that are No. 2 during the competition at Beijing.
NEWS
October 15, 1995 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three have been fired and 10 have quit. Nine have been promoted. Two have killed suspects while on duty. And one stands accused of falsifying evidence in a murder case. For most of the 44 Los Angeles Police Department officers labeled "problem officers" in the landmark 1991 Christopher Commission report, the past four years have been tumultuous. The commission said its intention was to illustrate, not define, what it called "the problem of excessive force in the LAPD."
NEWS
December 23, 1988 | NEIL FEINEMAN
If the men in your life are into outdoor sports, Christmas gift-giving just got easier. Until recently, says Douglas Brooks, author of "Going Solo: The Art of Personal Training" (Power Books, 1988), exercise fashion was limited to uniforms. But "uniforms don't flatter or make anyone feel special." And most people don't feel good about working out until they look good. For that reason, he continues, men involved in outdoor sports are now eager to make a fashion statement.
SPORTS
August 13, 1992 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Racing's first three-time winner of the Indianapolis 500 lives here, just to the side of a county road winding toward Cottonwood Cove, down past the town cemetery to the softball field, where the sign reads: "Cross at your own risk." Cross the sandy wash, and more than likely you will find Louie Meyer--winner of the 1928, 1933 and 1936 Indy 500s--sitting on his porch, soaking up the dry warmth of a 100-plus-degree desert day.
FOOD
March 29, 1990 | From Associated Press
All microwave ovens are not created equal. Just as microwave ovens vary in size, shape and color, their cooking power--or wattage--varies from oven to oven. Wattage affects cooking times, so it helps to know your microwave oven's wattage. However, according to the Campbell Microwave Institute, 88% of microwave oven owners don't know their oven's wattage, or they guess incorrectly. What's your watt?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1991 | LILY ENG and BOB SCHWARTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Fifty years ago, Hispanics made up barely 15% of Santa Ana's population. Mostly farm workers and laborers, they were forced to attend "Mexican" schools, not allowed to eat in certain restaurants, and segregated into five barrios. Now, according to U.S. Census figures released Monday, they make up 65% of the population, giving Santa Ana by far the highest percentage of Hispanics of any major California city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2014 | Tony Perry
Like many Americans of his generation, Kurt Chew-Een Lee was eager to fight in World War II. He left college at age 18 to enlist in the Marine Corps. Beyond a deeply felt patriotism, Lee had a personal motive: "I wanted to dispel the notion about the Chinese being meek, bland and obsequious," he told The Times in 2010. Rather than a combat billet, he was assigned as a language instructor in San Diego teaching Japanese. He was deeply disappointed but decided to remain in the Marine Corps after the war. He became an officer, one of the first Asian American officers in the Marine Corps.
SPORTS
March 9, 2014 | By James Barragan
The beginning of the end for Chivas USA could have gone unnoticed. Even as the team prepared to begin the final season of its 10-year history, following Major League Soccer's announcement last month that it had bought the club and would sell it to a new owner who would change the name, few fans could be spotted walking the streets around StubHub Center an hour before the game. Unlike Saturday night, when the Galaxy hosted its season opener at the venue in front of more than 25,000 fans, the streets around the stadium in Carson on Sunday were empty for Chivas USA's season opener against the Chicago Fire.
SPORTS
March 9, 2014 | From staff and wire reports
DETROIT -- William Clay Ford, the owner of the Detroit Lions and last surviving grandchild of automotive pioneer Henry Ford, has died. He was 88. Ford Motor Co. said in a statement Sunday that Ford died of pneumonia at his home. Ford helped steer the family business for more than five decades. He bought one of his own, the NFL franchise in the Motor City, a half-century ago. He served as an employee and board member of the automaker for more than half of its 100-year history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2014 | By Hillel Italie
Justin Kaplan, an author and cultural historian who wrote a definitive, Pulitzer Prize-winning biography of Mark Twain and spiced the popular canon as general editor of Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, has died. He was 88. Kaplan died Sunday at Mount Auburn Hospital in Cambridge, Mass. He had been suffering for years from Parkinson's disease, said his wife, author Anne Bernays. A longtime professor at Harvard University, Kaplan wrote several acclaimed biographies, notably "Mr. Clemens and Mark Twain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2014 | By Steve Chawkins
Though he lived in a region known worldwide for hyper-enthusiastic, round-the-clock innovating, Walter Cottle Lester wasn't a big fan of change. As Silicon Valley's subdivisions and office buildings surged around the farm his family had started more than a century before, he refused to sell. Reclusive and soft-spoken, he turned down potential earnings as high as $500 million. Instead, he arranged to donate his spread, the last big farm in the city of San Jose and one of the last in the sprawling Silicon Valley, for public use as a historic park.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
Maxine Kumin, the Pulitzer Prize-winning New England writer and onetime U.S. poet laureate, began writing poetry in the 1950s. She hated it when early mentors told her they liked her work because “she wrote like a man.” Alongside her friend and collaborator Anne Sexton, she embarked on a career that helped redefine what American poetry could be.  On Thursday, Kumin died at the age of 88. Her death was reported on the website of the American...
SPORTS
August 20, 1995 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a repertoire of dives that turned and twisted like the Big Sur coastline, Mark Lenzi figured it was a simple springboard flip to lifelong happiness. Diving had come so easily. No reason everything else wouldn't as well. Lenzi had it all, didn't he? A year after tumbling his way to the three-meter springboard title in the 1992 Summer Olympics at Barcelona, Lenzi discovered the sobering answer. It was staring him in the face, reflecting from another round of drinks.
SPORTS
September 15, 1988 | Jim Murray
It is a conceit of Americans that heroes, like Henry Adams' friends, are born, not made. Environment has nothing to do with it. That may be true. But how come all the great vaudeville comedians and almost all early-day radio humorists came from the Lower East Side of Manhattan? How come the great blues musicians came up the Mississippi out of New Orleans? Why do all the great actors and poets seem to come from England? Why do dancers come from Russia, tenors from Italy, skiers from Austria?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2014 | By Elaine Woo
Decades before she won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry, Maxine Kumin was a student at Radcliffe College who had summoned the courage to show a handful of her poems to an instructor. His comment couldn't have been more withering. "Say it with flowers," he wrote, "but for God's sake don't try to write poems. " Kumin heeded his advice. Seven years passed before she tried again, but this time her efforts brought far more encouraging results. With a clear-eyed vision of the natural world, relationships, mortality and the inner lives of women, Kumin became one of the country's most honored poets, whose fourth book of poetry, "Up Country," brought her the Pulitzer Prize in 1973.
SPORTS
December 31, 2013 | By Broderick Turner
In a reunion game of sorts, the Clippers got knocked in the mouth by a more aggressive and harder playing Phoenix Suns team. The Clippers got run over by the high-powered Suns, 107-88, Monday night at Staples Center in a game that featured three participants facing their former teams. But that became secondary to the Clippers easily suffering their worst beating of the season, cutting their lead over the Suns in the Pacific Division to just a half-game. "They beat us in everything," Chris Paul said.
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