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NEWS
May 9, 1998 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An identical twin whose plot to kill her sister made headlines around the world sobbed uncontrollably Friday as a judge sentenced her to 26 years to life in prison. Despite her emotional, last-minute protest of innocence, Jeen "Gina" Han, 24, dubbed "the evil twin," received the maximum sentence. "It is obvious Miss Han is a danger to society, particularly her own family," said Orange County Superior Court Judge Eileen C. Moore. "All of her family have been victims of her crimes."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
April 22, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court on Tuesday upheld the authority of police officers to stop cars and question drivers based on anonymous tips to hotlines. In a 5-4 decision, the justices ruled that such stops do not amount to an unreasonable search or seizure, even if the arresting officer did not observe the vehicle speeding or swerving. The decision affirms a ruling of the California courts. The case began in August 2008 when a 911 dispatch team in Mendocino County received a midafternoon report that a pickup truck had forced another vehicle off the road.
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NATIONAL
September 12, 2001 | Matea Gold and Maggie Farley, Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
In the worst terrorist attack ever against the United States, hijackers struck at the preeminent symbols of the nation's wealth and might Tuesday, flying airliners into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon and killing or injuring thousands of people. As a horrified nation watched on television, the twin towers of the World Trade Center in lower Manhattan collapsed into flaming rubble after two Boeing 767s rammed their upper stories. A third airliner, a Boeing 757, flattened one of the Pentagon's five sides.
NATIONAL
April 17, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
The nearly 13-minute 911 call in Denver that ended with the caller dead with a gunshot wound and her husband being taken to jail is being investigated to ensure the civilian dispatcher and responding officers properly handled the situation, police said. The suspected shooter, Richard Kirk, was ordered held without bond by a Denver judge on Wednesday. His wife, Kristine Kirk, reached 911 on Monday night to complain that her husband was hallucinating. She said the behavior was scaring her and their three children, according to a court document.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2000 | SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hours before he was killed, Nick Markowitz thought he was finally going home. It had been a strange, often scary two-day odyssey since a group of young men had snatched him off the street in his West Hills neighborhood and carted him up the coast to Santa Barbara, according to testimony before a Santa Barbara County grand jury released last week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1998 | DANA PARSONS
The defense attorney blamed his own bad judgment. The mother blamed her own bad parenting. Thousands of Koreans who petitioned the judge blamed a lack of American understanding for a seemingly peculiar nuance of Korean culture. But after all the blame had been parceled out, Judge Eileen Moore shoved it aside and sentenced 24-year-old Jeen Han to prison for a long, long time.
NEWS
July 19, 1998 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was supposed to be a brief stop at the Primadonna casino, 43 miles south of Las Vegas, but one poker game led to another. By 3 a.m. May 25, 1997, Jeremy Strohmeyer and David Cash were tired of hanging around the arcade, waiting for David's dad. Bored, the two 18-year-olds decided to urinate on two coin-operated games. David chose Big Bertha, whose polka-dot dress flared when players hurled balls into her gaping red mouth. Jeremy selected a helicopter game. Then a wall socket.
NEWS
October 15, 1995 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three have been fired and 10 have quit. Nine have been promoted. Two have killed suspects while on duty. And one stands accused of falsifying evidence in a murder case. For most of the 44 Los Angeles Police Department officers labeled "problem officers" in the landmark 1991 Christopher Commission report, the past four years have been tumultuous. The commission said its intention was to illustrate, not define, what it called "the problem of excessive force in the LAPD."
SPORTS
December 23, 1993 | From Associated Press
Houston Oiler Jeff Alm made a frantic 911 call to summon help after a car crash, yelling to the operator, "I have a buddy dying!" Seconds later, the operator heard four gunshots as Alm committed suicide. Fire department officials Wednesday released a recording of the call Alm made on his cellular phone shortly after his car crashed into a highway guardrail Dec. 14. His best friend, Sean Lynch, died after being thrown from the car and down an embankment.
NATIONAL
October 19, 2013 | By Matt Hamilton
An Illinois dad got the call on Thursday that no parent ever wants to receive. Brad Lewis' ex-wife was on the phone: Their 15-year-old son had shot himself in the chest. In the note Jordan Lewis left behind, he laid blame on bullying. Although stricken with grief, Lewis, 47, found resolve. He took to Facebook that night and posted a series of videos explaining his son's death and the events leading up to it: the alleged bullying, the concern of his son's best friend, the wellness visit by police the night before the suicide, and the 911 call his son made shortly before pulling the trigger.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2014 | By Ben Welsh, David Zahniser, Emily Alpert Reyes
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti's first proposed budget calls for hiring 140 firefighters and the start of a sweeping overhaul of the city's 911 dispatch system, part of a bid to speed the response to hundreds of thousands of calls for help each year. The revamped dispatch operation, outlined Monday by the mayor's office as it presented an $8.1-billion spending plan for the coming fiscal year, would unify separate police and fire emergency call centers and gradually replace some uniformed firefighters with lower-paid civilian phone operators.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2014 | By David Undercoffler
The 2014 Porsche 911 Turbo S is impressive enough in a straight line, ripping from zero to 60 in less than three seconds. But what happens on a smooth mountain road, at the apex of an uphill, right-hand sweeper, must be experienced to be believed. While G-forces are pressing your face sideways, the car seems to barely notice it is death-gripping a curve at 70 mph. This is a high-tech weapon aimed at the limits of physics. Lurking beneath the shapely body panels is an intelligent all-wheel-drive system, active aerodynamics and suspension, twin-turbocharging, torque vectoring, and rear-wheel steering, among other delights.
REAL ESTATE
April 8, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
More than a year after it approved a report critical of the CIA's interrogation and detention policies, the Senate Intelligence Committee has voted to make a portion of the document public. It's now up to President Obama to ensure that the agency doesn't mount a rear-guard attempt to censor or sanitize the committee's findings in the name of national security. Thanks to news reports and a report by the CIA's inspector general, Americans long have been aware of both the broad outlines and some abhorrent details of the Bush administration's mistreatment of suspected terrorists after 9/11.
OPINION
April 3, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
If you drive down Buckeye Road at the southern edge of Lima, Ohio, you'll pass an industrial complex where General Dynamics makes armored vehicles for the U.S. military. But if you stop and take a photograph, you just might find yourself detained by military police, have your camera confiscated and your digital photos deleted. Which is exactly what happened to two staffers for the Toledo Blade newspaper on Friday, in an unacceptable violation of the 1st Amendment and common sense. According to the Blade, staff writer Tyrel Linkhorn and photographer Jetta Fraser had just covered a news event at another Lima-area factory and decided to take photos of other businesses for future use, a common media practice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By Tony Perry
The nation needs to better acknowledge and support the efforts of the "hidden heroes" from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars: the estimated 1.1 million civilian, volunteer caregivers tending to the needs of wounded and disabled veterans, according to recommendations contained in a Rand Corp. study released Monday. While family members and others have long cared for veterans, the veterans from two recent wars are more likely to have mental health and substance problems, making the task of providing care even more difficult, according to the study, funded by the Elizabeth Dole Foundation.
NATIONAL
March 30, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
OSO, Wash. - One of the first 911 calls after the mudslide in this small town about an hour north of Seattle came from Marla Jupp. Jupp, 63, is a retired teacher's assistant, scion of a large local family that has lived in the Oso Valley along the Stillaguamish River for generations. They're the Skaglunds, and she still lives at the bottom of Skaglund Hill on State Route 530. She was at home a week ago Saturday when she heard what sounded like a big truck rumbling by shortly before 11 a.m., "like the wind was blowing real hard, like we had big gusts.
SPORTS
October 10, 2005 | Sam Farmer
It's a fall Monday, the sun is down, the pulse rate is up, and millions of Americans are tuning in to "Monday Night Football," the longest-running live prime-time show in television history. Filling the air is the familiar baritone of play-by-play announcer Al Michaels. Bank of America Stadium, home of the Carolina Panthers, is filled to capacity and rocking. Twenty TV cameras are rolling, poised to capture the action from every conceivable angle. A crescendo is building.
OPINION
January 11, 2005 | ROBERT SCHEER
Is it conceivable that Al Qaeda, as defined by President Bush as the center of a vast and well-organized international terrorist conspiracy, does not exist? To even raise the question amid all the officially inspired hysteria is heretical, especially in the context of the U.S. media's supine acceptance of administration claims relating to national security.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2014 | By Tony Perry
In his scathing and deeply reported examination of the U.S. Border Patrol, Todd Miller argues that the agency has gone rogue since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, trampling on the dignity and rights of the undocumented with military-style tactics. "The U.S. Border Patrol is not just the 'men in green,' it is a much larger complex and industrial world that spans from robotics, engineers, salespeople and detention centers to the incoming generation of children in its Explorer programs," Miller writes in "Border Patrol Nation: Dispatches From the Front Lines of Homeland Security.
NATIONAL
March 25, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
The woman on the other end of the line was breathless. "There's like a mudslide and everything's gone, the houses are gone," said the caller to the 911 operator in Snohomish County, Wash., on Saturday. As the dispatcher tried to calm her, the woman uttered: "I got people here screaming for help. ... They're in the middle of the mud. Oh my god. " PHOTOS: Washington mudslide On Tuesday, 911 tapes aired by Seattle-area KING-TV  revealed some of the early moments of the awe and terror felt after a massive mudslide wiped out a cluster of rural homes, killing at least 14 people and probably more.
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