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911 Emergency Telephone System

NEWS
February 3, 1995 | ANDREA FORD and JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Lawyers for O.J. Simpson continued their attack on the character of a potentially important prosecution witness Thursday, but government lawyers rose to the witness's defense and played for the jury a pair of emotional 911 calls in which Nicole Brown Simpson pleads for help as a man she identifies as her ex-husband yells in the background. The 911 tapes had been widely aired after Simpson's arrest June 17, when he was charged with the murders of Nicole Simpson and Ronald Lyle Goldman.
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NEWS
November 16, 1997 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There could hardly have been a worse time for Marcia Spielholz's cellular phone to fail her. It was a Sunday night in December, and the 37-year-old lawyer was on her way home to Beverly Hills from a Christmas shopping trip to Culver City. Along the way, it was clear, her BMW had attracted the attention of a pair of carjackers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1999 | JASON KANDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Santa Ana police and the CHP said Monday they are investigating a 911 emergency call about a carjacking that sent police on a chase to Artesia, where a Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy wounded a man believed to be involved in the crime. Police and the California Highway Patrol said the call from a cellular telephone may have been bogus. When police called the cellular number, a man answering it said he had not made any emergency call about a carjacking.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven years after voters approved the funding, the Los Angeles Police Department will break ground Monday on a new 911 center in the San Fernando Valley. "This is a long-awaited and important day for Angelenos," said Mayor Richard Riordan, who plans to attend the ceremony. "The new Valley 911 center is a critical component in Los Angeles' continuing effort to upgrade public-safety services."
BUSINESS
September 16, 1999 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new way of linking satellites and cellular phones in an emergency--or perhaps finding a place for dinner--got a big boost Wednesday from the Federal Communications Commission. By a 5-0 vote, the commission allowed the introduction of cell phones that use global positioning system satellites to automatically flash their locations to 911 operators.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taking sides in a dispute between the mayor and the city's top bureaucrat, the Board of Public Works will act next week on a contract to build a $20-million police dispatch center in the San Fernando Valley, board President Ellen Stein said Thursday. Acting City Administrative Officer Paul Cauley had asked the board to delay until he has completed a study into whether the city could save $7 million by moving the 911 project to Sun Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2001 | SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Callers who reach out and touch City Hall these days are likely to find themselves groping through a bureaucratic thicket. Take the recent experience of Jason Greenwald, a 29-year-old writer and political consultant. Greenwald was cruising down La Cienega Boulevard, past the Beverly Center shopping mall, when he saw two delivery trucks parked in the right lane, hampering traffic. So he grabbed his cell phone and dialed 911.
BUSINESS
October 6, 2001 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal regulators on Friday gave wireless carriers up to three more years to roll out a controversial new technology that would pinpoint the location of a cell phone user dialing 911. The 3-1 ruling by the Federal Communications Commission eased an Oct. 1 deadline the agency had imposed on the industry to begin deploying a $2-billion system that would track a mobile phone within 150 to 1,000 feet of its location. The FCC relaxed its stance after Verizon Wireless, Nextel Communications Inc.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2005 | From Associated Press
The Federal Communications Commission won't require Internet phone service providers to cut off customers who don't have reliable 911 emergency call service. The agency, in a notice issued late Monday, said providers that had not achieved full 911 compliance by Nov. 28 would not be forced to discontinue such service to any existing customers.
BUSINESS
September 28, 2005 | From Associated Press
The Federal Communications Commission backed off again Tuesday on enforcing a deadline for Internet phone service providers to disconnect all customers who haven't acknowledged that they understand it might be hard to reach a live emergency dispatcher when dialing 911. The agency explained that the status reports required from every Internet phone company last week showed that by "repeatedly prompting subscribers through a variety of means, the majority of providers ...
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