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911 Emergency Telephone System

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2001 | RICHARD WINTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Authorities are investigating why a 911 call from a woman to a West Covina dispatcher, reporting that her brother had been shot in a Northern California city, was never referred to local police as the victim lay dying for more than three hours. During the incident earlier this month, Pittsburg police finally went to the victim after Yvette Segala flew from Los Angeles to the San Francisco Bay Area and flagged down a patrol car.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2001 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Neighbors in La Quinta awoke early Friday morning to the screams of two sisters and called 911. But it took 14 minutes before firefighters, who were a mile away, got there and the women died, officials said Sunday. Riverside County fire officials have launched an investigation into how firefighters failed to receive the message that an apartment complex was ablaze in La Quinta, a Riverside County city in the foothills of the Santa Rosa Mountains.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2001 | SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Callers who reach out and touch City Hall these days are likely to find themselves groping through a bureaucratic thicket. Take the recent experience of Jason Greenwald, a 29-year-old writer and political consultant. Greenwald was cruising down La Cienega Boulevard, past the Beverly Center shopping mall, when he saw two delivery trucks parked in the right lane, hampering traffic. So he grabbed his cell phone and dialed 911.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2001 | SUE FOX
Callers who reach out and touch City Hall these days are likely to find themselves groping through a bureaucratic thicket. Take the recent experience of Jason Greenwald, a 29-year-old writer and political consultant. He was cruising down La Cienega Boulevard, past the Beverly Center shopping mall, when he saw two delivery trucks parked in the right lane, hampering traffic. So he grabbed his cell phone and dialed 911.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2001 | SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to ease the burden on the city's overloaded 911 system, Los Angeles officials plan to build a $10-million telephone answering system to handle nonemergency calls. But switching to a 311 system--envisioned as an all-purpose service to help unclog 911 lines--is so complicated that planners say it will take more than a year to set up even the bare bones. Wiring and staffing the new network is only part of the challenge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2001 | SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to ease the burden on the city's overloaded 911 system, Los Angeles officials plan to build a $10-million system to handle nonemergency calls. But switching to an all-purpose 311 system is so complicated that planners say it will take more than a year to create even a bare-bones network. Wiring and staffing the new network is only part of the challenge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2001 | SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nine years after Los Angeles voters approved $235 million in bonds to upgrade the city's outdated 911 system, the new emergency dispatch centers are still under construction and more than 200,000 calls a year are going unanswered. That's the worst tally for abandoned calls that the 911 system has logged in five years, according to Los Angeles Police Department records.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2000
Ventura County's police dispatch centers have an emergency of their own--long hours, high stress, limited pay and poor morale. These factors have combined to decimate the ranks of the women and men who respond to the county's 911 and law enforcement calls--to the point that some dispatchers are working 80 hours of overtime a month. Supervisors at the county's eight centers worry that dispatcher fatigue is leading to slower responses and missed calls.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2000
The City Council on Friday agreed to spend $40 million over the next seven years to implement a 311 phone system aimed at handling nonemergency calls and easing the burden on 911 emergency phone lines. Voting unanimously, council members agreed to move forward on the system, which will handle 20,000 calls a day once it is fully operational in 2007. Los Angeles police and city officials have said repeatedly that residents need an easy-to-remember phone number to use for less urgent problems.
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