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911 Emergency Telephone System

NEWS
April 4, 2000 | From Reuters
A computer virus that could disrupt 911 emergency services is being investigated after it was detected in the Houston area, the FBI said in a statement on Monday. Search warrants were issued in the case last week, but no arrests have been made, said a spokesman for the agency, which has made computer security a top priority since leading Web sites came under cyberattack in February.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2000
In an effort to slash response times, county fire dispatchers are prioritizing medical 911 calls, differentiating between the scraped knees and the massive heart attacks before sending out an emergency crew. It's a dramatic change from the way ambulance and fire crews have dispatched in the past. Typically, all calls went out as a Code 3--full speed ahead with lights and sirens blaring--even if the emergency was nothing more than someone stuck at home with a nasty flu bug.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1999 | From Bloomberg News
A credit card system in Britain and the 911 emergency response system in Charlotte, N.C., already have reported disruptions related to the Y2K computer changeover, a senior U.S. official said Wednesday. These regional examples "may be illustrative of the kind of glitches that are going to occur along the way here and around the world," said John Koskinen, chairman of President Clinton's Council on the Year 2000 Conversion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1999 | CAITLIN LIU
Donning hard hats, Los Angeles city and law enforcement officials symbolically broke ground Monday for the new 911 emergency dispatch center being built at 23001 Roscoe Blvd. "Today we come one step closer in making Los Angeles the safest city in America," Mayor Richard Riordan said at the ceremony on the construction site.
BUSINESS
September 16, 1999 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new way of linking satellites and cellular phones in an emergency--or perhaps finding a place for dinner--got a big boost Wednesday from the Federal Communications Commission. By a 5-0 vote, the commission allowed the introduction of cell phones that use global positioning system satellites to automatically flash their locations to 911 operators.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1999 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
They're dramatic, they're theatrical, and running them generally stinks. Is anyone else repulsed by TV newscasts gratuitously using 911 calls as centerpieces of titillation? Obviously so, judging from the anger of some viewers objecting to newscasts all across the TV landscape--from local stations to national networks--deploying "Star Trek" hero William Shatner's frantic Aug.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1999 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 10:20 p.m. Aug. 9, William Shatner, the "Star Trek" star who once hosted the TV action show "Rescue 911," made a dramatic, real-life emergency call. Gripped with panic and barely able to get the words out, Shatner pleaded for help from a 911 dispatcher minutes after discovering the body of his wife, Nerine, at the bottom of their swimming pool. "Oh my God!" Shatner yelled to the dispatcher. "What's your problem there, sir?" the dispatcher replied.
NEWS
August 6, 1999 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Only 37% of the nation's 911 emergency call centers are ready for the Y2K computer challenge that arrives with the new year, according to the President's Council on the Year 2000 Conversion. John A. Koskinen, who chairs the council, said Thursday that 911 computer failures could force local emergency personnel to abandon their automated locator systems and use backup manual dispatch methods, which could slow response time. "A large number of local governments have done a wonderful job," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1999 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles firefighters cut an 8-by-8-foot hole in a bedroom wall of a North Hollywood apartment Thursday morning to rescue a 57-year-old obese man who had trouble breathing. Responding to a 911 call at about 7 a.m. from the victim, 30 firefighters from the department's Heavy Rescue Team worked two hours to extricate former Los Angeles radio personality and lawyer John Swaney from his apartment. Firefighters also removed patio railing and sliding glass doors to reach him.
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