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911 Emergency Telephone System

SPORTS
August 14, 2003 | From Staff Reports
Two 911 calls to Kobe Bryant's house in Newport Beach were made for medical aid on behalf of Bryant's wife, Vanessa, according to documents released by the Newport Beach city attorney's office Wednesday. Newport Beach police responded to a 911 call from Bryant's home at 12:25 a.m. on July 3, and a summary of the investigation regarding the call states that Bryant said he placed the call "for medical assistance for his wife." Bryant was arrested July 4 in Eagle, Colo.
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SPORTS
August 2, 2003 | Stuart Pfeifer and Lance Pugmire, Times Staff Writers
Hours after Kobe Bryant was questioned by detectives about his alleged sexual assault of a 19-year-old woman in Colorado, the Laker guard placed a 911 call from his Newport Beach home, prompting paramedics to treat a female at the house, authorities said Friday. Bryant made the call at 12:25 a.m. on July 3.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2003 | Hector Becerra, Times Staff Writer
As a result of a routing mistake last week that sent paramedics to Sylmar instead of Pacoima to help a child who was having seizures, fire officials said Tuesday they will change the way dispatchers deal with confusion over addresses. On Feb. 25, a Los Angeles Fire Department dispatcher sent paramedics to an old address, which was displayed by the 911 database that ties phone numbers to addresses. Verizon Inc.
NATIONAL
January 29, 2003 | John J. Goldman, Times Staff Writer
It is a small-town tragedy in a New England-style seacoast village that stands incongruously in the Bronx. Police searched the icy waters off City Island again Tuesday for four teenagers who set off in darkness in a tiny rowboat after attending a party Friday night. No trace of the eight-foot dinghy or its occupants has been found. Authorities believe the boys drowned, and said at best they could have survived only 30 minutes in the frigid waters of Long Island Sound.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2002 | Hugo Martin, Times Staff Writer
As a veteran 911 operator with the California Highway Patrol, Deanna Mora has been trained to calm distraught murder witnesses, comfort suicidal callers and make peace during angry domestic disputes. But she was not prepared for the call she received not long ago from an upset woman who had just left a pet grooming salon in Orange County. The woman's emergency? Her dog had just received a bad haircut and she wanted the police to take some action. Nearly half of the 7.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
Police set up a temporary center for emergency calls Wednesday after electrical problems caused the city's 911 system to fail for seven hours, authorities said. For much of the day, 911 calls to Pomona were routed to a dispatch center at the Chino Police Department. The California Highway Patrol still took cellular calls. The system was down from 10:10 a.m. to about 5 p.m.
NATIONAL
July 24, 2002 | From Associated Press
The mayor's office says it plans to keep secret hundreds of written and audio records related to the Fire Department's response to the Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center. The documents include 911 calls from people trapped in the towers, radio transmissions between firefighters and taped oral histories with firefighters and emergency medical technicians recounting their experiences that day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2002
A partial transcript of the 911 call to the Riverside County Sheriff's Department released Friday in which a man reports the discovery of 5-year-old Samantha Runnion's body in a mountain area. Authorities said it had been edited to remove information about the caller. * CALLER: Oh my God, I found a dead body. Please hurry. OK? I'm in the Ortegas, OK? Ortega mountains. I'm in Riverside County, OK?
NATIONAL
July 7, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
A Florida man was charged with faking more than 1,100 calls to 911, tying up emergency service lines for two days. Michael A. Holmes, 20, placed the calls June 30 and Monday because he was bored, an Alachua County Sheriff's Office spokesman said. "We normally have 190 cell phone calls in a 24-hour period. One night, he gave us over 800," said Sgt. Keith Faulk. "If something really bad had happened, this could have kept somebody from getting help."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2002 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frustrated by the large volume of 911 calls caused by people accidentally hitting programmed buttons on their cell phones, police and emergency response authorities are seeking new ways to keep systems from becoming overloaded. Nearly two-thirds of all the 911 calls from wireless phones in California, and even higher proportions elsewhere in the country, involve people pushing emergency buttons on their cell phone keypads without knowing it, authorities say.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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