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NEWS
August 4, 1991
Over the past months, a troubling pattern of indifference to the interests of 9th District residents has become evident in the form of (Long Beach) Mayor (Ernie) Kell's commission nominations. Mayor Kell continues to nominate persons residing outside the 9th District to the most important city commissions that affect our community as well as the whole city. When he does make a nomination of a 9th District resident, it is often without the input of either myself or our local neighborhood associations or community leaders.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2013 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
L.A.'s 9th City Council District is among the poorest in the city, taking in a stretch of South Los Angeles where the median household income is less than $30,000 per year. Yet despite persistent economic woes, the district has become a hot spot for expensive campaign contributions in this year's election, with special interests from across the state spending big in the race to replace termed-out Councilwoman Jan Perry. Labor unions, businesses, billboard companies, healthcare interests and others have spent $900,000 on unlimited "independent expenditures" for state Sen. Curren Price (D-Los Angeles)
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NEWS
August 15, 1991
Long Beach Councilman Warren Harwood's letter to the editor (Times, Aug. 4) referred to the lack of representation and input from the 9th District, due to Mayor (Ernie) Kell's lack of nominations from said district. I am a resident of the 9th District and have been recommended by Mr. Harwood and confirmed by the City Council to many mayor's task forces and commissions over the past 10 years. It was my honor on July 30 to be confirmed by the City Council as a mayoral appointee to the Parks and Recreation Commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2013 | By David Zahniser
This post has been updated. See below for details. Los Angeles City Councilman Bernard C. Parks on Wednesday endorsed council candidate Ana Cubas in the May 21 race to represent part of South Los Angeles, calling her a “bridge builder” between the district's various racial and ethnic groups. Parks, a former police chief, described the former council aide as someone who would bring together the black, Mexican American and Salvadoran communities in neighborhoods immediately south of downtown.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1989 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, Times Staff Writer
For the first time in 26 years, some prominent members of Los Angeles' black community are calling for the city's senior minority politician to step down. Even as Gilbert Lindsay appears headed for a landslide reelection to his seventh term as councilman from downtown and South-Central Los Angeles, there is a growing wave of discontent in the district. "He has stayed too long," said Mark Ridley-Thomas, director of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.
NEWS
June 5, 1991 | LAURIE BECKLUND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tuesday was supposed to mark the first City Council election in the 9th District in 27 years without Gilbert W. Lindsay in it. But six months after Lindsay died at 90, voters in what he liked to call "the Great 9th" were still measuring Lindsay's potential successors by the long shadow cast by the 5-foot, 3-inch totem of South-Central Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1990
Regarding articles calling for Lindsay to step down due to illness and inability to represent the people of the "Great 9th District," I find it very necessary to apply this same rationale to Supervisor Kenneth Hahn, whose 2nd Supervisorial District represents 99% of South Central Los Angeles. It's now time for the people of the 9th District and the 2nd Supervisorial District to acknowledge the contributions these legends have made in the past, but to recognize their needs for future leadership in districts that are changing everyday with more sophisticated and complex problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1990
In 1963--at a time when the majority of black Americans were not allowed to vote--Gilbert W. Lindsay became the first black member of the Los Angeles City Council. His appointment represented a dramatic rise from his days of picking cotton in his native Mississippi and of scrubbing toilets in Los Angeles. The 90-year-old Lindsay died on Friday nearly four months after an incapacitating stroke left him paralyzed--and his 9th District without a voice on the council.
OPINION
June 23, 1991
I am disappointed in The Times' brief announcement regarding the swearing in of Rita Walters to represent the 9th District. The blurb that appeared (Metro Digest, June 15) did not reflect the magnitude of an event of major historical importance: the election of the first black woman to the Los Angeles City Council. The path-breaking inauguration, in my opinion, deserved, at the very least, the same type of in-depth coverage that was devoted to the losing candidate (Bob Gay). Rita Walters' election represents a great victory for women.
NEWS
February 28, 2013 | By Jon Healey
It's easy to understand why special interests are pouring dollars into the mayor's race in Los Angeles -- the mayor is the most powerful official in the second-largest city in America. What's less intuitive is why they're spending so much in the race for the City Council's 9th District, the city's poorest. According to financial disclosures compiled by the city Ethics Commission, candidates in the 9th have attracted $330,000 in independent expenditures so far -- more than any other council seat.
NEWS
February 28, 2013 | By Jon Healey
It's easy to understand why special interests are pouring dollars into the mayor's race in Los Angeles -- the mayor is the most powerful official in the second-largest city in America. What's less intuitive is why they're spending so much in the race for the City Council's 9th District, the city's poorest. According to financial disclosures compiled by the city Ethics Commission, candidates in the 9th have attracted $330,000 in independent expenditures so far -- more than any other council seat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2013 | By Seema Mehta and Kim Christensen, Los Angeles Times
Second in a series of articles focusing on key periods in the lives of the mayoral hopefuls. When Jan Perry came to Los Angeles as a college freshman to watch the Ohio State Buckeyes play in the 1974 Rose Bowl, she had no idea that a trip to a football game would change her life. "All I remember is being shocked at how warm it was when I got here and the sky was blue and that people were wearing shorts," Perry said, recalling walking down Hollywood Boulevard, visiting Olvera Street and seeing the Jackson Five in the Rose Parade.
NEWS
February 25, 2013
Hello. I'm Times Political Writer Seema Mehta and here's your L.A. City Election update. The nation's eyes were fixed this weekend on the Oscar race unfolding in Hollywood. But with just days to go before the citywide March 5 election, local political contests were getting just as hot and heavy. The Times took a wide-angle look at the challenges facing the city as voters pick a successor to termed-out Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa. City leaders have already cut hundreds of millions of dollars out of everyday services and ongoing maintenance to stay afloat, but the next chief executive will have to make hard decisions , especially in light of costly, ill-timed spending commitments made at City Hall and a failure to adjust to the region's weakening economic foundation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2013 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles reached a benchmark half a century ago when the City Council's first African American was appointed to represent the area then known as South Central. Gilbert Lindsay, a former cotton field worker and city janitor, was chosen in 1963 to fill a vacant seat in the 9th Council District, which covered part of South Los Angeles. The appointment helped make "The Great 9th," as Lindsay took to calling it, a hub of black political clout. Two generations later, with the seat open and the March 5 election approaching, the area that gave birth to historic South Central Avenue and the city's black middle-class culture has a far different political landscape.
NEWS
February 18, 2013 | By Robert Greene
This post has been corrected, as indicated below. If you're a candidate for Los Angeles City Council and you walk into a roomful of prospective constituents, you'd better be prepared with an answer to this question: How long have you lived here? That was the first question put to candidates for the 9th District at a forum Saturday at Dr. Maya Angelou Community High School in South Los Angeles. And most candidates were in fact prepared: They had already addressed the issue in their opening statements.
NEWS
January 22, 2013 | By Robert Greene
That's about 40 down and about 37 to go. Candidates , that is -- candidates for city, school board and community college offices in the March 3 Los Angeles election. The Los Angeles Times editorial board this week hit about the halfway mark in interviewing candidates who are seeking its endorsement. Time is tight. With the November election right behind us, we began interviewing candidates in December , gave ourselves a three-day break after New Year's Day, and then picked up the pace.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1990
It's painful to watch a once-vigorous person become debilitated. Some had that feeling recently while watching the videotaped Iran-Contra trial testimony of former President Ronald Reagan. Anyone who saw that video of Reagan testifying about all he couldn't remember had to be relieved he was no longer the Chief Executive. Many Angelenos have that same uneasy feeling now in watching 89-year-old City Councilman Gilbert Lindsay, increasingly weak and befuddled as the result of a 1988 stroke.
NEWS
June 5, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
NEW YORK -- Former President Bill Clinton was a consummate team player Monday, crediting President Obama for making the tough calls in a turbulent political climate and calling the prospect of a Mitt Romney presidency "calamitous. " President Obama was equally kind to his predecessor, praising his "inexhaustible energy and knowledge," and his legacy of leading Democrats"out of the wilderness" with a "thoughtful, common-sense, progressive agenda. " But days earlier, just across the Hudson River, was a fresh reminder of the political rivalry that once captivated the party -- with the two men appearing on opposite sides in one of the nation's most contentious congressional primary battles in the newly-redrawn 9th congressional district in New Jersey.
NEWS
June 5, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
NEW YORK -- Former President Bill Clinton was a consummate team player Monday, crediting President Obama for making the tough calls in a turbulent political climate and calling the prospect of a Mitt Romney presidency "calamitous. " President Obama was equally kind to his predecessor, praising his "inexhaustible energy and knowledge," and his legacy of leading Democrats"out of the wilderness" with a "thoughtful, common-sense, progressive agenda. " But days earlier, just across the Hudson River, was a fresh reminder of the political rivalry that once captivated the party -- with the two men appearing on opposite sides in one of the nation's most contentious congressional primary battles in the newly-redrawn 9th congressional district in New Jersey.
NATIONAL
September 14, 2011 | By Tina Susman and Geraldine Baum, Los Angeles Times
Democrat David Weprin's biggest foe in the special election for New York's 9th Congressional District may not have been the ultimate victor, Republican Bob Turner. Instead, it appears Weprin was done in by a whiny-voiced octogenarian ex-mayor, who took what might have been another Democratic rout in the overwhelmingly Democratic district and helped turn it into a referendum on President Obama's Middle East policy. Weprin had other things working against him going into Tuesday's vote: his endorsement of same-sex marriage, which enraged many of the Orthodox Jewish voters; his membership in a political party blamed by many for the country's economic mess; his perceived lack of familiarity with the district; even his mustache.
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