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August 16, 1994 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In a highly unusual move, the chief judge of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court has appointed a special committee to investigate charges that Los Angeles federal Judge A. Andrew Hauk is unable to discharge his duties because of "a mental disability," according to documents obtained by The Times. Circuit Judge J. Clifford Wallace of San Diego formed the committee on July 27 in response to a March, 1993, complaint from Julian Ayrs, a Los Angeles literary agent.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2004 | Claudia Luther, Times Staff Writer
A. Andrew Hauk, a controversial federal judge who during his years of decision-making in the Central District repeatedly made comments from the bench that were widely viewed as intemperate, has died. He was 91. Hauk died Tuesday in Pasadena, according to court officials. No cause of death was given. Hauk, who was educated at Regis College in Massachusetts and studied law at Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal court jury Wednesday acquitted two Los Angeles Police Department SWAT team officers of wrongfully killing a Los Angeles man, but jurors said afterward that they believed the officers' superiors should have been held responsible and that they would have returned a verdict against them. On Friday, U.S. District Judge A. Andrew Hauk dismissed eight of the original 10 defendants from the civil suit, including the two leaders of the SWAT squad.
NEWS
August 16, 1994 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In a highly unusual move, the chief judge of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court has appointed a special committee to investigate charges that Los Angeles federal Judge A. Andrew Hauk is unable to discharge his duties because of "a mental disability," according to documents obtained by The Times. Circuit Judge J. Clifford Wallace of San Diego formed the committee on July 27 in response to a March, 1993, complaint from Julian Ayrs, a Los Angeles literary agent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1991 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court has reversed a controversial decision by a Los Angeles judge to expunge an Army reservist's criminal convictions so that he could accompany his unit to the Persian Gulf War. In a brief, unanimous decision made public Friday, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals vacated the decision of veteran U.S. District Judge A. Andrew Hauk to annul the criminal record of James Patrick Smith, 45. At the hearing on Aug. 24, over the vigorous objections of federal prosecutor Stephen A.
NEWS
May 12, 1988 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
A senior federal judge has ruled that five-year minimum sentences in drug cases are unconstitutional, comparing the congressional sentencing mandate to asking judges to "cut . . . off someone's testicles, or their female sexual organs." U.S. District Judge A. Andrew Hauk, in a ruling that the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1991 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Veteran U.S. District Judge A. Andrew Hauk today will reconsider his controversial 1989 decision to give a light sentence to a young female bank robber after declaring that women are "soft touches" for clever men, "particularly if sex is involved." Long well-known for eccentric comments from the bench, Hauk refused to follow federal sentencing guidelines for 24-year-old Dannielle T. Mast because, he said, Mast had fallen under the "Svengali" spell of her boyfriend, Lonnie Jackson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1992 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles federal judge Monday resentenced the so-called "Miss America bandit" to the same lenient term that was overturned last year, saying he still believed that the woman had robbed five South Bay banks while under "the malevolent and irresistible influence of her boyfriend." U.S. District Judge A. Andrew Hauk said it would constitute "cruel and unusual punishment" to compel Dannielle T.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1992 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court criticized controversial Los Angeles Judge A. Andrew Hauk on Thursday for making "harmful and gratuitous comments," but upheld the conviction of a heroin dealer, whom Hauk compared to former Panamanian dictator Manuel Noriega. In a 2-1 decision, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco sustained the 1990 conviction of Larry D. Milner on charges of conspiracy and possession of heroin with intent to distribute.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1991 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles federal judge said Monday he is inclined to again give a light sentence to a woman convicted of bank robbery, but before making a decision he will hold an unusual hearing to determine if she acted under the "Svengali" influence of her boyfriend. On May 9, 1989, U.S. District Judge A. Andrew Hauk sentenced Danielle T. Mast to two years in federal prison, rather than the 57 to 71 months prescribed by federal guidelines, for robbing five South Bay banks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1992 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court criticized controversial Los Angeles Judge A. Andrew Hauk on Thursday for making "harmful and gratuitous comments," but upheld the conviction of a heroin dealer, whom Hauk compared to former Panamanian dictator Manuel Noriega. In a 2-1 decision, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco sustained the 1990 conviction of Larry D. Milner on charges of conspiracy and possession of heroin with intent to distribute.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1992 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles federal judge Monday resentenced the so-called "Miss America bandit" to the same lenient term that was overturned last year, saying he still believed that the woman had robbed five South Bay banks while under "the malevolent and irresistible influence of her boyfriend." U.S. District Judge A. Andrew Hauk said it would constitute "cruel and unusual punishment" to compel Dannielle T.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1991 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles federal judge said Monday he is inclined to again give a light sentence to a woman convicted of bank robbery, but before making a decision he will hold an unusual hearing to determine if she acted under the "Svengali" influence of her boyfriend. On May 9, 1989, U.S. District Judge A. Andrew Hauk sentenced Danielle T. Mast to two years in federal prison, rather than the 57 to 71 months prescribed by federal guidelines, for robbing five South Bay banks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1991 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Veteran U.S. District Judge A. Andrew Hauk today will reconsider his controversial 1989 decision to give a light sentence to a young female bank robber after declaring that women are "soft touches" for clever men, "particularly if sex is involved." Long well-known for eccentric comments from the bench, Hauk refused to follow federal sentencing guidelines for 24-year-old Dannielle T. Mast because, he said, Mast had fallen under the "Svengali" spell of her boyfriend, Lonnie Jackson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1991 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court has reversed a controversial decision by a Los Angeles judge to expunge an Army reservist's criminal convictions so that he could accompany his unit to the Persian Gulf War. In a brief, unanimous decision made public Friday, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals vacated the decision of veteran U.S. District Judge A. Andrew Hauk to annul the criminal record of James Patrick Smith, 45. At the hearing on Aug. 24, over the vigorous objections of federal prosecutor Stephen A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1991 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. attorney's office in Los Angeles has challenged a federal judge's decision to expunge a criminal conviction of an Army reservist who said last August that he needed a clean record so he could accompany his unit to the Persian Gulf. In rendering his decision, U.S. District Judge A. Andrew Hauk also raised anew questions about his unpredictable judicial demeanor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1991 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. attorney's office in Los Angeles has challenged a federal judge's decision to expunge a criminal conviction of an Army reservist who said last August that he needed a clean record so he could accompany his unit to the Persian Gulf. In rendering his decision, U.S. District Judge A. Andrew Hauk also raised anew questions about his unpredictable judicial demeanor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2004 | Claudia Luther, Times Staff Writer
A. Andrew Hauk, a controversial federal judge who during his years of decision-making in the Central District repeatedly made comments from the bench that were widely viewed as intemperate, has died. He was 91. Hauk died Tuesday in Pasadena, according to court officials. No cause of death was given. Hauk, who was educated at Regis College in Massachusetts and studied law at Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal court jury Wednesday acquitted two Los Angeles Police Department SWAT team officers of wrongfully killing a Los Angeles man, but jurors said afterward that they believed the officers' superiors should have been held responsible and that they would have returned a verdict against them. On Friday, U.S. District Judge A. Andrew Hauk dismissed eight of the original 10 defendants from the civil suit, including the two leaders of the SWAT squad.
NEWS
May 12, 1988 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
A senior federal judge has ruled that five-year minimum sentences in drug cases are unconstitutional, comparing the congressional sentencing mandate to asking judges to "cut . . . off someone's testicles, or their female sexual organs." U.S. District Judge A. Andrew Hauk, in a ruling that the U.S.
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