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REAL ESTATE
August 18, 1985
Construction has begun on a $1.6-million penthouse spa and members' lounge as additions to the Club Donatello, a proprietary-interest club occupying the top floors of the Pacific Plaza hotel at Post and Mason streets in San Francisco. When completed in December, the 3,600-square-foot penthouse will also contain a club lounge and conference room, a Grecian-style gymnasium with exercise equipment, private indoor and outdoor tanning facilities and a classic Roman bath of white travertine marble.
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BUSINESS
November 12, 1985 | BILL RITTER
The Executive Hotel block, built in 1963 by financier C. Arnholt Smith, reflects the aristocratic ambiance that Smith and his wife typified in their heyday. The complex was sold at auction by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. in 1977 to millionaire businessman Charles Woods, four years after Smith's financial empire collapsed amid fraud and mismanagement. Since then, the complex has been beset by a series of business controversies.
BUSINESS
January 30, 1988 | Associated Press
A document that had been sealed in court claims that misconduct by the former top officers of American Savings & Loan cost the thrift more than $400 million, according to a published report. The Monterey Herald reported in a copyrighted story Friday that it had obtained a copy of the company's proof of loss document, which was lodged under seal with Monterey County Superior Court Judge Richard Silver last year. The document was part of a lawsuit between American Savings and hotel developer A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1987 | SCOTT HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Officers of the Church of the Open Door said Friday that they have received a quirky, mysterious offer for the "Jesus Saves" building on Hope Street totaling $16 million in cash. Or is it really $23 million? Therein lies the quirk. As for mystery, the question is: Just exactly who is trying to buy the landmark church? Church of the Open Door officials--mindful of their bitter, long-running feud with flamboyant TV evangelist Gene Scott--say they are thus very skeptical of the offer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1988 | SCOTT HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
The saga of Los Angeles' "Jesus Saves" church--now featuring an ex-con deal maker as well as TV preacher Gene Scott--took another plot turn Wednesday when a city commission refused to extend a demolition moratorium on the downtown landmark. The decision was hailed by the Glendora-based Church of the Open Door, which has been repeatedly frustrated in efforts to sell its old Hope Street home to developers.
TRAVEL
February 24, 1985 | Stan Delaplane, Delaplane is a San Francisco Chronicle columnist
The Palm Bay Club, ultra exclusive, is on the north shore of Miami's Biscayne Bay. Next door is the Palm Bay Hotel and spa. It's open to the public. A poor relative of its neighbor but by no means cheap. About $90 will get you a room. For a suite, $150. The club's founder was Mrs. Cornelia V. (Connie) Dinkler. She bought the place, then a yacht club, in 1964.
TRAVEL
August 16, 1987 | FRANK RILEY, Riley is travel columnist for Los Angeles magazine and a regular contributor to this section
From Big Sur to Maui and back to Monterey--that's the travel trail of what has become the world's largest Marine Art Expo. The first annual Monterey Marine Art Expo 87, which opened here Aug. 1 and will continue through Sept. 30, has been drawing so many visitors that it may become an annual attraction like its counterpart on the island of Maui.
TRAVEL
February 2, 1986 | SHIRLEY SLATER and HARRY BASCH, Slater and Basch are Los Angeles free-lance writers.
It is a street of memories and ghosts, this place called Cannery Row--a waterfront avenue where John Steinbeck's earthy characters roamed, loved, drank and died in an era of stink, grime and wealth. --Jerry Hulse Fact and fiction blur and overlap on the tough, resilient street John Steinbeck dubbed Cannery Row. The Nobel and Pulitzer laureate called it "a poem, a stink, a grating noise, a quality of light . . .
REAL ESTATE
April 21, 1985 | DAVID M. KINCHEN, Times Staff Writer
"The first thing we do, let's kill all the lawyers." King Henry VI--Part II, Act IV, Scene 2. Michael L. Tenzer would agree with Shakespeare's often quoted--and misquoted--line and he might even go so far as to include the more radical consumer activists. Speaking last week at the 19th annual seminar of the National Assn.
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