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Aaron Feuerstein

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1995
Good health and a long life to Aaron Feuerstein, owner of the recently fire-gutted Malden Mills of Methuen, Mass., for his broad social and economic vision (Dec. 19)! Here is an entrepreneur who is apparently motivated in his actions by something more than the proverbial "bottom line." What a rarity is this "boss" in a business world dominated by mean-spirited runaways ever ready to relocatem upholstery factory of 70 workers for a family business founded by my grandfather here in Los Angeles in 1912.
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BUSINESS
August 26, 2003 | From Reuters
The chief executive of Malden Mills Industries Inc., maker of Polartec fleece, suffered a setback in his attempt to regain control of the company when the U.S. Export-Import Bank declined part of his request for a $35-million loan guarantee. The bank, a lender of last resort, approved a preliminary loan guarantee of only $20 million for Malden Mills, which is working to emerge from bankruptcy protection.
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NEWS
December 19, 1996 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Malden Mills burned to the ground just before Christmas last year, taking with it 1,400 jobs and seemingly the soul of this city, Aaron Feuerstein proved himself a man out of step with corporate America. First, he gave every worker a $275 Christmas bonus. ("Do not despair," his holiday note said. "God bless every one of you.") Then he announced that all employees would receive full pay and benefits for at least 90 days.
BUSINESS
August 4, 2003 | Justin Pope, Associated Press
With their backs to the wall, few chief executives get much sympathy these days. Aaron Feuerstein gets checks in the mail from strangers. The unsolicited contributions started eight years ago, after the CEO became a hero for refusing to lay off workers after a fire devastated his Malden Mills Industries Inc. textile plant. Now, Feuerstein is fighting to keep control of his company, and the pace of the donations has quickened. "The checks come in every single day," the 77-year-old said.
BUSINESS
August 26, 2003 | From Reuters
The chief executive of Malden Mills Industries Inc., maker of Polartec fleece, suffered a setback in his attempt to regain control of the company when the U.S. Export-Import Bank declined part of his request for a $35-million loan guarantee. The bank, a lender of last resort, approved a preliminary loan guarantee of only $20 million for Malden Mills, which is working to emerge from bankruptcy protection.
BUSINESS
August 4, 2003 | Justin Pope, Associated Press
With their backs to the wall, few chief executives get much sympathy these days. Aaron Feuerstein gets checks in the mail from strangers. The unsolicited contributions started eight years ago, after the CEO became a hero for refusing to lay off workers after a fire devastated his Malden Mills Industries Inc. textile plant. Now, Feuerstein is fighting to keep control of his company, and the pace of the donations has quickened. "The checks come in every single day," the 77-year-old said.
NEWS
February 6, 1996 | From Associated Press
Arctic cold spread misery in the South on Monday, shattering low-temperature records that had stood for more than a century, imperiling Florida oranges, bursting pipes in New Orleans and freezing fishing boats to their moorings in North Carolina. Temperatures dropped into the single digits as far south as Huntsville, Ala., at 4 degrees; Chattanooga, Tenn., at 2; and Meridian, Miss., at 8. Thousands of people still had no electricity after weekend ice storms snapped power lines.
NEWS
December 23, 1995 | Associated Press
Malden Mills resumed partial production Friday, less than two weeks after an explosion and fire leveled much of the textile factory. About 300 of the company's 2,500 employees went back to work finishing and dyeing the fleecy Polartec fabric used in clothing sold by retailers such as L.L. Bean, Patagonia and Eddie Bauer. They worked in a building that was almost untouched by the Dec. 11 fire. The fire injured 33 people and destroyed three of the complex's nine buildings.
BUSINESS
February 7, 1996 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Labor Secretary Robert Reich proposed Tuesday that companies be rewarded with lower taxes or no tax bill at all in return for sharing more of their profits with workers, providing good health and pension benefits and helping retrain those who get laid off. In a speech at the George Washington University Business School, Reich called for a "new era of corporate citizenship," with companies focusing less single-mindedly on profits and more on the general welfare of their workers and communities.
NEWS
December 19, 1995 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two weeks before Christmas, on an Arctic night fierce with howling winds, Methuen watched its economic lifeline--Malden Mills, one of the last great textile mills in New England--burn to the ground.
NEWS
December 19, 1996 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Malden Mills burned to the ground just before Christmas last year, taking with it 1,400 jobs and seemingly the soul of this city, Aaron Feuerstein proved himself a man out of step with corporate America. First, he gave every worker a $275 Christmas bonus. ("Do not despair," his holiday note said. "God bless every one of you.") Then he announced that all employees would receive full pay and benefits for at least 90 days.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1995
Good health and a long life to Aaron Feuerstein, owner of the recently fire-gutted Malden Mills of Methuen, Mass., for his broad social and economic vision (Dec. 19)! Here is an entrepreneur who is apparently motivated in his actions by something more than the proverbial "bottom line." What a rarity is this "boss" in a business world dominated by mean-spirited runaways ever ready to relocatem upholstery factory of 70 workers for a family business founded by my grandfather here in Los Angeles in 1912.
BUSINESS
February 15, 1998 | MARTHA GROVES
The audaciously titled First International Symposium on Spirituality and Business will be held next month in Boston, with the aim of attracting the emerging community "engaged in transforming commerce and the global economy and creating a lively and vibrant workplace that uplifts the human spirit." It is hardly the first conference on the subject, although it is the first to be sponsored by a theological school (Andover Newton).
NEWS
May 17, 1996 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Thursday jawboned 100 business leaders on the responsibilities of corporations to their employees--and on the ways government can nudge them in the direction it wants without spending money. Clinton took the White House pulpit and gently bullied businesses to voluntarily provide worker benefits that he has been unable to persuade Congress to mandate--health coverage, workplace child care, job retraining, generous pensions and labor-management teamwork.
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