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Aaron Mcgruder

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2014 | by Greg Braxton
Aaron McGruder, the creator of "The Boondocks" comic strip and animated series, has finally weighed in on his exit from the show, saying an emotional goodbye to his edgy characters just a few weeks before the April 21 launch of the fourth and final season of the series on Adult Swim. His comments come a week after Sony Pictures Television, which produces the animated series about 10-year-old black militant Huey Freeman and his gangsta-wanna-be younger brother Riley living in the suburbs with their grandfather, said in a press release that the upcoming season "was produced without the involvement of Aaron McGruder, when a mutually agreeable production schedule could not be determined.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2014 | by Greg Braxton
Aaron McGruder, the creator of "The Boondocks" comic strip and animated series, has finally weighed in on his exit from the show, saying an emotional goodbye to his edgy characters just a few weeks before the April 21 launch of the fourth and final season of the series on Adult Swim. His comments come a week after Sony Pictures Television, which produces the animated series about 10-year-old black militant Huey Freeman and his gangsta-wanna-be younger brother Riley living in the suburbs with their grandfather, said in a press release that the upcoming season "was produced without the involvement of Aaron McGruder, when a mutually agreeable production schedule could not be determined.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2014 | by Greg Braxton
"The Boondocks," the edgy animated series based on Aaron McGruder's comic strip about 10-year-old black militant Huey Freeman and his gangsta-wanna-be younger brother Riley living in the suburbs with their grandfather, is returning April 21 for a fourth and final season on Adult Swim. However, there's a catch. McGruder, who created the series and was its key creative force, is not along for the ride. A press release from Sony Pictures Television, which produces the series, noted that the new season "was produced without the involvement of Aaron McGruder, when a mutually agreeable production schedule could not be determined.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2014 | by Greg Braxton
"The Boondocks," the edgy animated series based on Aaron McGruder's comic strip about 10-year-old black militant Huey Freeman and his gangsta-wanna-be younger brother Riley living in the suburbs with their grandfather, is returning April 21 for a fourth and final season on Adult Swim. However, there's a catch. McGruder, who created the series and was its key creative force, is not along for the ride. A press release from Sony Pictures Television, which produces the series, noted that the new season "was produced without the involvement of Aaron McGruder, when a mutually agreeable production schedule could not be determined.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2010 | By Jon Caramanica, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Like libertarians, Chicago Cubs loyalists and believers in the impending 2012 apocalypse, fans of "The Boondocks" are masochists. Self-righteous ones at that. It's not sufficient to enjoy the show on its own creative merits. Rather, it must be subscribed to with a fervor. Long gaps between seasons are to be tolerated with a smile. The show, they'll tell you, is one of the most reliable critiques of contemporary culture and politics on television. And yet, it is not. Or at least, not as much as it should or could be. Now in its third season, "The Boondocks" (Adult Swim at 11:30 p.m. Sundays)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2007 | Greg Braxton, Times Staff Writer
Aaron McGruder, the Artist Formerly Known as the Angriest Black Man in America, can't stop smiling. In fact, he's busting up, bobbing and weaving as he reacts to the animation unfolding on his living room wall big screen.
MAGAZINE
April 25, 2004 | Greg Braxton, Greg Braxton is a Times staff writer.
"Aaron McGruder graduated from the University of Maryland with a degree in Afro-American studies. Or was it African-American studies? I don't know--it was some ol' Black stuff, that much is definite. He has been a syndicated cartoonist since 1999, when 'The Boondocks' first launched in newspapers around the country. He has since moved to Los Angeles, put a couple books out, been on TV a bunch of times--you know the usual. 'He's controversial.' 'He got an Image Award.' Blah, blah, blah.
NEWS
April 16, 1999
"The nation's first hip-hop comic strip" joins Section Gee! on Monday. Written by 24-year-old Aaron McGruder, "The Boondocks" focuses on a group of transplanted city kids adjusting to life in the 'burbs and is said to "break barriers that others have danced around."
OPINION
October 17, 2002
On Sunday, "The Boondocks" comic strip compared President Bush unfavorably with Adolf Hitler. The artist, Aaron McGruder, is very talented, and I would give my life for his and my right to freedom of speech. Hitler, however, was a man who killed 6 million of my ancestors, and to compare him to Bush isn't funny or true. McGruder should be ashamed. Greg Steinberg Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2006 | Greg Braxton
Aaron McGruder, creator of "The Boondocks" newspaper strip, will take a six-month sabbatical from the politically charged cartoon beginning March 27. No official reason for the break was given by Universal Press Syndicate, which distributes the strip to 300 newspapers, including the Los Angeles Times. McGruder could not be reached for comment. McGruder for more than a year has been juggling the strip and the animated series it spawned on the Cartoon Network.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2010 | By Greg Braxton, Los Angeles Times
Aaron McGruder of "The Boondocks" and Tyler Perry of "Meet the Browns" and TBS' "House of Payne" are unlikely allies, but they have a common link. Both are the key creative forces behind some of Turner Broadcasting's popular hits. Still, executives for the broadcaster, which owns both TBS and the Cartoon Network (home to "Boondocks"), might be wise not to sit the two men together at the same table during the next company picnic. The latest episode of "The Boondocks," the satirical animated TV series that airs on the Cartoon Network's Adult Swim slate, takes brutal aim at Perry and his brand, which blends melodrama, raucous comedy and religious themes.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2010 | By Jon Caramanica, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Like libertarians, Chicago Cubs loyalists and believers in the impending 2012 apocalypse, fans of "The Boondocks" are masochists. Self-righteous ones at that. It's not sufficient to enjoy the show on its own creative merits. Rather, it must be subscribed to with a fervor. Long gaps between seasons are to be tolerated with a smile. The show, they'll tell you, is one of the most reliable critiques of contemporary culture and politics on television. And yet, it is not. Or at least, not as much as it should or could be. Now in its third season, "The Boondocks" (Adult Swim at 11:30 p.m. Sundays)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2007 | Greg Braxton, Times Staff Writer
Aaron McGruder, the Artist Formerly Known as the Angriest Black Man in America, can't stop smiling. In fact, he's busting up, bobbing and weaving as he reacts to the animation unfolding on his living room wall big screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2006 | Greg Braxton
Aaron McGruder, creator of "The Boondocks" newspaper strip, will take a six-month sabbatical from the politically charged cartoon beginning March 27. No official reason for the break was given by Universal Press Syndicate, which distributes the strip to 300 newspapers, including the Los Angeles Times. McGruder could not be reached for comment. McGruder for more than a year has been juggling the strip and the animated series it spawned on the Cartoon Network.
MAGAZINE
May 23, 2004
I have just returned from Uzbekistan, having served a deployment as flight surgeon with the 746th Expeditionary Air Squadron, and flying combat and combat support missions in Afghanistan. I read the article on Aaron McGruder last night ("He's Gotta Fight the Powers That Be," by Greg Braxton, April 25). Like his protagonist, the humorless, hostile, arrogant Huey, McGruder is angry, but not as a result of actual experience. Huey's pronouncements, like McGruder's, are rooted in the vicarious worlds of media and entertainment.
MAGAZINE
May 16, 2004
I just finished reading the article about cartoonist Aaron McGruder ("He's Gotta Fight the Powers That Be," by Greg Braxton, April 25). I'm an older white guy, and I like his strip and admire his guts--as well as many of his stances regarding the current Bush administration. However, I'm sorry that his concern for the failure of systems designed to protect this country does not extend to the many out-of-work American animators who would have loved working on his upcoming animated TV series.
NEWS
July 11, 1999
I was very concerned to read in the July 4 Sunday comics that "The Boondocks" will be replaced by a strip from the "Star Wars: Episode I" movie. First, I like "The Boondocks." As a white person, I think I need to be challenged and have my consciousness raised. Besides, the cartoons are funny. Second, the Jar Jar Binks character from "Star Wars" is offensive. He's a sort of Stepin Fetchit character with racist undertones. Replacing "The Boondocks" with this "Star Wars" strip is amazingly insensitive.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2003 | Greg Braxton
Tom Papa Comic The comedian soon will be treading the treacherous path many others have traveled: trying to translate success on the club circuit to a sitcom triumph. For every Ray Romano, though, there are many more who find their comic sensibilities altered or watered down. Papa is taking a hands-on approach to his series, "Come to Papa," one of NBC's midseason prospects that will hit prime time within the next few months.
MAGAZINE
May 9, 2004
Thank you for putting Aaron McGruder on the cover of your magazine ("He's Gotta Fight the Powers That Be," by Greg Braxton, April 25). It's about time someone gave him recognition. On C-SPAN I happened to see McGruder giving a speech to a university. For the first time I heard someone publicly voice real concerns about the Bush administration--clearly, intelligently and even humorously. Hearing McGruder gave me renewed faith in the idea of freedom of speech and the possibility of meaningful dissent with a sitting administration.
MAGAZINE
April 25, 2004 | Greg Braxton, Greg Braxton is a Times staff writer.
"Aaron McGruder graduated from the University of Maryland with a degree in Afro-American studies. Or was it African-American studies? I don't know--it was some ol' Black stuff, that much is definite. He has been a syndicated cartoonist since 1999, when 'The Boondocks' first launched in newspapers around the country. He has since moved to Los Angeles, put a couple books out, been on TV a bunch of times--you know the usual. 'He's controversial.' 'He got an Image Award.' Blah, blah, blah.
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