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Aaron Spelling

ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2006 | Greg Braxton, Times Staff Writer
If it's a late summer's night nightmare, it must be Emmy time. As if cursed, the Emmys in recent years have been plagued by inconvenient truths, large and small. Last year's ceremony was held in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. In 2001, there were the Sept. 11 attacks, which resulted in two cancellations. Then there were those close encounters of the celebrity kind. John Ritter's death in 2003 cast a pall over the planned comic-hosted ceremony.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2006 | Martha Groves and Annette Haddad, Times Staff Writers
In the rarefied realm of ultra-deluxe Southern California real estate, it appears there is no such thing as requiescat in pace. Or even a decent interval, for that matter. Despite denials by those involved, speculation persists that Candy Spelling, the widow of the recently deceased TV mogul Aaron Spelling, is planning to place the family's famous 56,500-square-foot Holmby Hills mansion on the market. The price for the 45-room, six-acre property?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2006 | AL MARTINEZ
WHAT the world probably doesn't need is another story about Aaron Spelling, who gave us such discriminating television classics as "Charlie's Angels" and "The Love Boat" and who decided to die last week. I use the word advisedly because I'm sure he had something to say about when his life should end, because he was always in charge of his own destiny. And while you may not need another story about him, I have one anyhow.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2006 | Brenda Hampton, Special to The Times
TV mogul Aaron Spelling, who died Friday at age 83 because of complications stemming from a stroke, left an indelible mark on the medium. "7th Heaven" creator Brenda Hampton, who worked closely with Spelling in recent years, recalls her friendship with the show's executive producer. * The first time Aaron Spelling ever called me at home, I was grilling a steak, and as I watched from my kitchen window, it went up in flames and burned to a crisp. It was Aaron Spelling on the phone. Wow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2006 | Rene Lynch, Times Staff Writer
Actress Tori Spelling said Saturday that she was thankful she had the chance to reconcile with her father, TV mogul Aaron Spelling, before he died. Spelling, 83, died Friday at his Holmby Hills mansion of complications from a stroke he suffered earlier in the week. His shows -- "Dynasty," "Charlie's Angels," "Melrose Place" and "Beverly Hills, 90210" among them -- were often derided by critics but were wildly popular with TV watchers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2006 | Brian Lowry, Special to The Times
Aaron Spelling, whose knack for tapping into the public's taste for light entertainment made him both the most prolific and one of the wealthiest producers in television history, died Friday evening. He was 83. Spelling died at his Holmby Hills mansion of complications from a stroke he suffered Sunday, according to his publicist, Kevin Sasaki. His wife, Candy, and son, Randy, were at his bedside.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Aaron Spelling, producer of TV's "Beverly Hills, 90210" and "Charlie's Angels," suffered a stroke at his Holmby Hills estate Sunday and was being treated at home, his publicist said Wednesday. "I don't know the extent of it" said spokesman Kevin Sasaki. "But if it had been some incredible degree, he would have been taken to the hospital." Spelling, 83, was conscious and resting comfortably, Sasaki said. Spelling's wife, Candy, has been at his side.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2006 | Claire Hoffman, Times Staff Writer
TV producer Aaron Spelling can sue his former nurse for allegedly violating a confidentiality agreement, but a judge ruled Monday that he can't sue her on defamation grounds. Spelling, 83, and his wife, Candy, 60, sued the nurse, Charlene Richards, accusing her of breaking the pact in which she agreed to protect the family's privacy by not revealing details to acquaintances.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2006 | Claire Hoffman, Times Staff Writer
Television impresario Aaron Spelling won't be allowed to keep portions of his own courtroom drama out of the public view, according to a Thursday court ruling. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge William Highberger denied a request by Spelling's lawyers to seal a deposition taken in a nasty legal fight between the "Beverly Hills, 90210" producer and his former nurse, Charlene Richards. The Los Angeles Times, represented by 1st Amendment attorney Susan E.
BUSINESS
January 27, 2006 | Robert W. Welkos
A woman who worked as a home nurse to Aaron Spelling sued the Hollywood TV producer alleging sexual harassment. Charlene Richards, who worked for Spelling between Oct. 4, 2004, and April 24, 2005, said he made numerous unwanted sexual advances during her employment and engaged in other inappropriate behavior. The suit names as defendants the producer and his wife, Candy, as well as the couple's trust.
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