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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2000
Re "Sometimes 'Coercion' Is a Virtue," editorial, June 30: I wish to express my deep concern about The Times' support for the proposed bill AB 1800. It is a dangerous law that would mandate forced psychiatric treatment for any California citizen, under the weakest of legal pretenses. This proposed law is an affront to the fundamental right of an individual to make his or her own choices regarding health care. If AB 1800 is passed, even petty disputes between neighbors could result in one or both of them being forcibly incarcerated for psychiatric "evaluation" and involuntary drugging.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
Hoping to build on momentum for changing the country's immigration laws, busloads of immigrants from throughout California are descending on Sacramento on Monday to push for a half dozen bills at the state level. About 500 immigrants from as far away as San Diego are expected to participate in Monday's 17 th  annual Immigrant Day, meeting with lawmakers and their staffs to advocate for priority bills, according to Reshma Shamasunder, executive director of the California Immigrant Policy Center.
OPINION
April 7, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Finally, there's legislation that proposes reasonable solutions to the tortuous procedure for firing the worst teachers in California. The teachers who routinely screen movies instead of giving instruction, who denigrate their students, ignore them, harass them or even physically abuse them - yet who can appeal the firing process for years, during which the schools still must pay their salaries. Several reform-oriented bills went overboard to fix this. Under one, teachers suspected of abusive behavior would have had no avenue to appeal their dismissal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1994
Pornographic news racks will never appear in Simi Valley again due to the signing of AB 17 by Gov. Wilson. Four years ago, I participated in an effort to stop pornographic news racks in Simi Valley, which proliferated around town like a cancer. After several hundred people went to the City Council, the city acted to get rid of these news racks. A couple of years later, summer of 1992, some news racks came back, and again we organized to get rid of them. And we did. The fight is now over.
OPINION
July 8, 2002
You are right in calling AB 2958 a shameful outrage, but you glossed over another disturbing fact ("Pull In Phone Monopoly... ," editorial, July 1). When it came time for the Assembly to vote, only one member, Rod Pacheco (R-Riverside), wondered about the validity of a bill that is backed by SBC Communications--which, we found, underreported its net income by $2 billion between 1997 and 1999 alone (that translates to $350 million due to customers under profit-sharing)--and is opposed by numerous consumer groups throughout the state.
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