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ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2004
I find it high irony that Sinclair Broadcasting deems as a "political" act the honoring of soldiers killed in Iraq, as ABC's "Nightline" planned to do Friday night by reading their names ("Soldier Tribute in Line of Fire," by Elizabeth Jensen, April 30). The only political act here is Sinclair Broadcast Group's refusal to air the show. This is yet another hypocritical and cynical attempt at censorship by a Bush campaign contributor helping Bush spin his war to the American people. Robert Nusbaum Redondo Beach Sinclair's position is one of partisan bias toward the Republicans, as they view any recognition of our losses as a statement against the war. In this day and age when too much time is devoted to celebrity and entertainment topics, we should encourage programs such as "Nightline" when they raise the quality of journalism by paying public tribute to the men and women of the armed forces.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 13, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Just one week after Orvillecopter took the Internet by storm, the APSCA has released Hovercat -- a new video that offers a less morbid take on the flying cat phenomenon. As you may recall, the Orvillecopter was a dead, stuffed cat that was turned into a remote-control helicopter by its owner -- Dutch artist Bret Jansen. The "Katkopter," as the Dutch press came to call it, debuted at an art festival in Amsterdam and created a stir around the world. For those who couldn't abide Orvillecopter (and we heard from plenty of people who could not)
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2002
You'll be able to wake up and go to sleep with Bruce Springsteen on Tuesday. He'll be performing with the E Street Band on NBC's "Today" show in the morning and then will appear on ABC's "Nightline" that night. Why? He has a new album hitting the stores.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2004
I find it high irony that Sinclair Broadcasting deems as a "political" act the honoring of soldiers killed in Iraq, as ABC's "Nightline" planned to do Friday night by reading their names ("Soldier Tribute in Line of Fire," by Elizabeth Jensen, April 30). The only political act here is Sinclair Broadcast Group's refusal to air the show. This is yet another hypocritical and cynical attempt at censorship by a Bush campaign contributor helping Bush spin his war to the American people. Robert Nusbaum Redondo Beach Sinclair's position is one of partisan bias toward the Republicans, as they view any recognition of our losses as a statement against the war. In this day and age when too much time is devoted to celebrity and entertainment topics, we should encourage programs such as "Nightline" when they raise the quality of journalism by paying public tribute to the men and women of the armed forces.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1989 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
It's adored and it's vilified. It's feared by some as a mind-altering drug or a subliminal messenger, ridiculed by others as a trivial boob tube, an idiot box, a vast, gray, barren, parched wilderness. To still others, it's a revolution, a religion, a behemoth and quite simply the most profound development of modern times. It's a diversion, a companion, a family member, a Big Brother, a Big Baby-Sitter. You watch it, it watches your kids. And this is the year that American television turns 50. Only a shrinking minority of Americans can recall when there wasn't TV, or even when it began.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1988
In response to Jeane Kirkpatrick's column "Damning Ambiguity to PLO's Declarations," Op-Ed Page, Nov. 18: Why does The Times bother to print this woman's articles on the Middle East? It is a known fact she is a blatant supporter of the Zionist cause, plus being anti-Arab as well as anti-Palestinian. Her disgraceful negative attitude on ABC's "Nightline" would make these points clearly evident to anyone. Spare us this woman's misplaced venom. JACK LAUTERBACH Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1989 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
On the screen Wednesday night was Ted Koppel in Beijing. Watching the screen Wednesday night was Steve Futterman in Los Angeles. Only recently, it had been almost the reverse: Koppel was doing ABC's "Nightline" from his usual New York base, and Futterman was grabbing occasional glimpses of America on the television set in his Beijing hotel room when he wasn't on the streets covering one of the major stories of the decade. What a difference 48 hours made. "There was a little bit of surrealism as I saw the latest footage from Tian An Men Square," said Futterman, a reporter for NBC/Mutual Radio, who had just returned from three weeks of intense China duty that included witnessing the military's bloody repression of protesting masses.
NEWS
June 13, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Just one week after Orvillecopter took the Internet by storm, the APSCA has released Hovercat -- a new video that offers a less morbid take on the flying cat phenomenon. As you may recall, the Orvillecopter was a dead, stuffed cat that was turned into a remote-control helicopter by its owner -- Dutch artist Bret Jansen. The "Katkopter," as the Dutch press came to call it, debuted at an art festival in Amsterdam and created a stir around the world. For those who couldn't abide Orvillecopter (and we heard from plenty of people who could not)
BUSINESS
February 10, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
David Choe, the graffiti artist who made headlines for having an estimated $200 million in Facebook stock, spent the last week in New York, granting interviews to a lucky few media outlets. He snubbed the New York Times and Wall Street Journal but did agree to speak with Howard Stern, Barbara Walters for ABC's "Nightline," and the Taiwanese animated news service Next Media Animation. Interesting choices. Howard Stern offered to adopt Choe, after double checking that the artist still had the Facebook shares.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
Oh my God! Parents, quick, lock up your black sons! There's a roving gang of Hasidim in Brooklyn randomly beating up blacks ! It's happened at least once, and it could definitely happen again. And it seemed like it might have been a game, or part of a possible trend. Or … whatever. It's proof for sure of white hatred and resentment against black people. I could go on here, but you get my overheated point. The “knockout game,” a faux trend promulgated by media outlets who have deliberately or unthinkingly bought into racial stereotypes about black teenagers has kind of jumped the shark.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2002
You'll be able to wake up and go to sleep with Bruce Springsteen on Tuesday. He'll be performing with the E Street Band on NBC's "Today" show in the morning and then will appear on ABC's "Nightline" that night. Why? He has a new album hitting the stores.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1989 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
On the screen Wednesday night was Ted Koppel in Beijing. Watching the screen Wednesday night was Steve Futterman in Los Angeles. Only recently, it had been almost the reverse: Koppel was doing ABC's "Nightline" from his usual New York base, and Futterman was grabbing occasional glimpses of America on the television set in his Beijing hotel room when he wasn't on the streets covering one of the major stories of the decade. What a difference 48 hours made. "There was a little bit of surrealism as I saw the latest footage from Tian An Men Square," said Futterman, a reporter for NBC/Mutual Radio, who had just returned from three weeks of intense China duty that included witnessing the military's bloody repression of protesting masses.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1989 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
It's adored and it's vilified. It's feared by some as a mind-altering drug or a subliminal messenger, ridiculed by others as a trivial boob tube, an idiot box, a vast, gray, barren, parched wilderness. To still others, it's a revolution, a religion, a behemoth and quite simply the most profound development of modern times. It's a diversion, a companion, a family member, a Big Brother, a Big Baby-Sitter. You watch it, it watches your kids. And this is the year that American television turns 50. Only a shrinking minority of Americans can recall when there wasn't TV, or even when it began.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1988
In response to Jeane Kirkpatrick's column "Damning Ambiguity to PLO's Declarations," Op-Ed Page, Nov. 18: Why does The Times bother to print this woman's articles on the Middle East? It is a known fact she is a blatant supporter of the Zionist cause, plus being anti-Arab as well as anti-Palestinian. Her disgraceful negative attitude on ABC's "Nightline" would make these points clearly evident to anyone. Spare us this woman's misplaced venom. JACK LAUTERBACH Los Angeles
NEWS
February 19, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
A young man mouths off from the back of an SUV in a Florida convenience store parking lot - and Michael Dunn, sitting in the next vehicle, pulls a gun out of his glove compartment and opens fire , later claiming he felt threatened by a shotgun that he, and only he, saw. A group of teens pulls a prank by dumping eggs, mayonnaise and leaves on a parked car - and Willie Noble, whose car it was, allegedly storms out of his house and opens fire,...
NEWS
January 20, 2012 | By James Oliphant
In the increasingly volatile race for the Republican presidential nomination, at least one analyst suggests that Newt Gingrich's ex-wife's claims about his infidelity will help power him to a win in the South Carolina primary. Why? Because Gingrich was served “a fastball down the middle” on the matter at Thursday night's debate and “just knocked it out of the park.” So says Matthew Dowd, the GOP strategist who was on ABC's “Good Morning America” on Friday. “This moment was a gift for Newt Gingrich,” Dowd said.
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