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NEWS
June 29, 1987 | Associated Press
The Reagan Administration has agreed in principle to an Egyptian request to co-produce the U.S. Army's main battle tank, the M-1, and is working out final details before informing Congress, a State Department official said today. The Egyptian defense minister, Abdel-Halim abu Ghazala, has been pushing for more than a year for permission to either build or assemble the M-1 Abrams tank, which entered U.S. service in 1980, according to State and Defense Department officials.
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NEWS
October 27, 1985 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
Warning: This story contains descriptions of events that never occurred. Event No. 1: An attempt was made recently on the life of President Hosni Mubarak in (a) Alexandria, (b) Heliopolis. Mubarak was in his car and (a) was wounded in the neck, or (b) hand, or (c) was not wounded at all; his driver was (a) shot in the neck, (b) shot in the leg, or (c) killed. Event No. 2: Defense Minister Abdel-Halim abu Ghazala, in a separate incident, was shot and (a) wounded (b) killed. Event No.
NEWS
November 26, 1985 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
Egypt said Monday that extremist Palestinians and an "Arab country known for its terrorist actions" were responsible for the hijacking of an EgyptAir jetliner. Deeply embarrassed by the bloody outcome, the government also sought to defend its decision to storm the jet on Malta, a move that resulted in heavy loss of life Sunday among the plane's passengers.
OPINION
January 27, 1985 | David Lamb, David Lamb is The Times' correspondent in Cairo.
Egypt put on an exhibition last November to show the representatives of 200 international companies the products of its newest industry. Eleven types of weapons were on display. The weapons ranged from a radar-equipped missile, the local version of the Soviet SAM-7, to the Fahd armored personnel carrier, named for the king of Saudi Arabia.
NEWS
August 3, 1986 | MICHAEL ROSS and CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writers
Vice President George Bush arrived in Egypt on Saturday to confer with President Hosni Mubarak and other officials on the stalled Middle East peace process and on Cairo's requests for more U.S. aid to help its nearly bankrupt economy meet $3.5 billion in foreign debt payments this year.
NEWS
July 31, 1993 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The conventional wisdom here is that former Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser scoured the nation for a man simple-minded enough to present no political threat, if selected vice president. He found Anwar Sadat. Sadat, it is said, surveyed the landscape and named Hosni Mubarak as his vice president. And Mubarak, who ascended to the presidency with Sadat's assassination in 1981, never named a vice president.
NEWS
December 21, 1987 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
The ink had barely dried on last month's Arab League decision to allow member states to resume diplomatic ties with Egypt when, with great public fanfare, a high-ranking Egyptian military delegation flew to Kuwait to make a point that it was hoped would not be lost on Iran. Egypt, the unwritten message said, was back in the Arab fold and ready to commit its substantial military resources to the defense of its smaller Persian Gulf allies, should the need arise.
NEWS
November 30, 1985 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
Despite a number of sobering constraints, pressure is building on the government of President Hosni Mubarak to take military action against Libya following last week's bloody hijacking of an EgyptAir jetliner to Malta, diplomatic and Egyptian analysts say. These analysts believe that it is only a question of time before Egypt takes some kind of action against Libya's leader, Col.
NEWS
July 26, 1989 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
A year-old espionage scandal involving Egypt and the United States took on a new twist Tuesday with the mother of an American doctor convicted of spying for the CIA threatening to begin an indefinite hunger strike to protest what she believes to be her son's innocence. Rose Wassef, an Egyptian-born American from Troy, Mich., said she would not break her fast until Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak agreed to see her to discuss her son's case.
OPINION
March 16, 1986 | Michael Ross, Michael Ross is The Times' correspondent in Cairo.
The world seems to be closing in on Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. Terrorism, student demonstrations and a bloody mutiny by the Central Security Forces have rocked the country in the past few months. Diplomats and Egyptians agree that Mubarak handled the mutiny uncharacteristically well but it raises serious questions about the future, particularly the regime's relationship with the army.
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