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WORLD
April 10, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Algeria's president, an ally in the U.S. campaign against terrorism, overwhelmingly won reelection in a vote that his rival said was a sham. President Abdelaziz Bouteflika was elected to a second term with 83% of Thursday's vote, the Interior Ministry said. Former Prime Minister Ali Benflis was a distant second with 8%. He alleged irregularities "in thousands of polling stations" and vowed to appeal to the panel that validates results.
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WORLD
April 18, 2014 | By Sherif Tarek
Algeria's ailing President Abdelaziz Bouteflika secured a fourth five-year tenure Friday after amassing nearly 82% of votes, according to initial results announced by Interior Minister Tayeb Belaiz. The landslide victory in Thursday's election was widely foreseen, despite opposition from Islamists and leftist groups, and his poor health. Bouteflika, 77, is recovering from a stroke and made few public appearances. Ali Benflis, considered the strongest among five challengers to Bouteflika, came in second, with 12% of the vote, Belaiz said.
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NEWS
April 28, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Abdelaziz Bouteflika was sworn in as Algeria's new president, despite the protests of six rival candidates who withdrew from the election because of alleged voting fraud. Bouteflika, 63, promised to focus on ending Algeria's 7-year-old Islamic insurgency, which has left 75,000 people dead and led to international isolation. In a ceremony at the seaside Palais des Nations west of the capital, Algiers, Bouteflika also promised to fight corruption and work to develop the economy.
WORLD
February 22, 2014 | By Amro Hassan
CAIRO -- Algeria's ailing President Abdelaziz Bouteflika ended months of speculation about his political future by announcing Saturday that he would run for a fourth term in office, Algeria's state news agency, APS , reported. The relatively weak Algerian opposition has often said that the 76-year-old, who suffered a stroke last year, lacks the physical abilities to prolong his 15-year rule of country. However, Prime Minister Abdelmalek Sellal denied that Bouteflika 's health is an issue when he confirmed the president's candidacy in the election scheduled for April 17. "President Bouteflika is healthy and he has the required intellectual capacities and vision to fulfill his duties," Sellal said Saturday at a news conference at the African Conference on Green Economy in the western Algerian city of Oran.
WORLD
April 9, 2004 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
The president who led this blood-soaked nation through the waning years of an Islamist uprising appeared poised to win a second term Thursday in an election that was seen as a test of Algeria's democratic leanings. In a land where elections are often tangled with the threat of violence, the voting went off without widespread rioting, bombing or battles.
WORLD
April 18, 2014 | By Sherif Tarek
Algeria's ailing President Abdelaziz Bouteflika secured a fourth five-year tenure Friday after amassing nearly 82% of votes, according to initial results announced by Interior Minister Tayeb Belaiz. The landslide victory in Thursday's election was widely foreseen, despite opposition from Islamists and leftist groups, and his poor health. Bouteflika, 77, is recovering from a stroke and made few public appearances. Ali Benflis, considered the strongest among five challengers to Bouteflika, came in second, with 12% of the vote, Belaiz said.
WORLD
February 22, 2014 | By Amro Hassan
CAIRO -- Algeria's ailing President Abdelaziz Bouteflika ended months of speculation about his political future by announcing Saturday that he would run for a fourth term in office, Algeria's state news agency, APS , reported. The relatively weak Algerian opposition has often said that the 76-year-old, who suffered a stroke last year, lacks the physical abilities to prolong his 15-year rule of country. However, Prime Minister Abdelmalek Sellal denied that Bouteflika 's health is an issue when he confirmed the president's candidacy in the election scheduled for April 17. "President Bouteflika is healthy and he has the required intellectual capacities and vision to fulfill his duties," Sellal said Saturday at a news conference at the African Conference on Green Economy in the western Algerian city of Oran.
WORLD
September 7, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A suicide bomber killed 15 people in the Algerian town of Batna, shortly before a scheduled visit by President Abdelaziz Bouteflika, state television reported. Bouteflika, who later visited some of the 74 wounded in a hospital, blamed Islamist rebels. Residents said that the bomb was detonated among a crowd waiting to see the president arrive. "Terrorist acts have absolutely nothing in common with the noble values of Islam," Bouteflika was quoted as saying.
WORLD
April 1, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Algerian security force members were responsible for the abduction and disappearances of 6,146 civilians during a decade-long struggle with Islamic rebels, a government-appointed commission concluded. The civilians are presumed killed. Farouk Ksentini, appointed by President Abdelaziz Bouteflika to conduct the investigation, said the forces had acted on their own, not on orders of the state.
NEWS
November 23, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A prominent leader of Algeria's outlawed Islamic Salvation Front who opposed the government but had spoken out for peace and reconciliation was slain as he was leaving a dental clinic in Algiers. Abdelkader Hachani, 43, was shot twice in the head and once in the chest by an unknown assailant, according to news service reports and a statement on state-run radio.
WORLD
April 10, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Algeria's president, an ally in the U.S. campaign against terrorism, overwhelmingly won reelection in a vote that his rival said was a sham. President Abdelaziz Bouteflika was elected to a second term with 83% of Thursday's vote, the Interior Ministry said. Former Prime Minister Ali Benflis was a distant second with 8%. He alleged irregularities "in thousands of polling stations" and vowed to appeal to the panel that validates results.
WORLD
April 9, 2004 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
The president who led this blood-soaked nation through the waning years of an Islamist uprising appeared poised to win a second term Thursday in an election that was seen as a test of Algeria's democratic leanings. In a land where elections are often tangled with the threat of violence, the voting went off without widespread rioting, bombing or battles.
NEWS
April 28, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Abdelaziz Bouteflika was sworn in as Algeria's new president, despite the protests of six rival candidates who withdrew from the election because of alleged voting fraud. Bouteflika, 63, promised to focus on ending Algeria's 7-year-old Islamic insurgency, which has left 75,000 people dead and led to international isolation. In a ceremony at the seaside Palais des Nations west of the capital, Algiers, Bouteflika also promised to fight corruption and work to develop the economy.
WORLD
December 9, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Leaders from more than 50 Muslim countries promised to fight extremist ideology, saying they would reform textbooks, restrict religious edicts and crack down on terrorism financing. Kings, heads of states and ministers closed a two-day summit in Islam's holiest city, Mecca. The Organization of the Islamic Conference nations also said that fatwas must only be issued by "those who are authorized," an effort to curb edicts by clerics who denounce other Muslims and allow their killing.
NEWS
July 6, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Prisons began releasing thousands of Muslim militants under a mass Algerian Independence Day pardon issued by President Abdelaziz Bouteflika in his drive to end seven years of bloodshed. Appealing on television for support, Bouteflika told Algerians: "It is time for the people to intervene directly, to impose the solution they long for. I need popular support to sustain my efforts to resolve the crisis."
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