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Abdications

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WORLD
December 17, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
King Jigme Singye Wangchuck abdicated and announced that he would hand power to his Western-educated son, who is expected to usher in a parliamentary democracy for the isolated Himalayan kingdom. The king, who assumed the throne in 1972 when he was 17, said a year ago that he would abdicate in favor of 26-year-old Crown Prince Jigme Khesar Namgyel Wangchuck in 2008 as part of the Buddhist country's transformation from an absolute monarchy.
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WORLD
June 25, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
CAIRO -- The emir of Qatar handed power to his son Tuesday at a time when the country has parlayed its media empire and natural gas riches into prominent regional influence that includes arming Syrian rebels and building a grandiose Museum of Islamic Art. In a nationally televised speech, Sheik Hamad bin Khalifa al Thani tapped his fourth son, Sheik Tamim bin Hamad al Thani, 33, to succeed him. A Cabinet shuffle is expected in the transition, but...
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WORLD
October 7, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Cambodia's King Norodom Sihanouk is abdicating because of poor health and has asked the country to search for a successor, said his son Prince Norodom Ranariddh, who is also the head of the National Assembly. The king, 81, made the announcement from Beijing, where he had been receiving medical treatment. He left Cambodia last year after failing to end the feuding among political parties. Cambodia's monarch is not selected according to heredity, but the candidate must have a royal bloodline.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2013 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
Environmental groups are taking the Justice Department to court over a policy that prohibits prosecuting individuals who kill endangered wildlife unless it can be proved that they knew they were targeting a protected animal. Critics charge that the 15-year-old McKittrick policy provides a loophole that has prevented criminal prosecution of dozens of individuals who killed grizzly bears, highly endangered California condors and whooping cranes as well as 48 federally protected Mexican wolves.
WORLD
October 15, 2004 | From Associated Press
Prince Norodom Sihamoni was named Cambodia's king Thursday, succeeding his father, Norodom Sihanouk, who last week announced his abdication because of ill health. Sihamoni, a former ballet dancer and cultural ambassador who has spent much of his life abroad, was approved by a nine-member Throne Council, said a statement signed by the panel's chairman and acting head of state, Chea Sim.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1990
The resignation of drug czar William J. Bennett provides President Bush with an opportunity to direct the nation's drug policy a little more toward treatment and less toward law enforcement. Bennett, acknowledged even by his critics as a master of the bully pulpit, championed the philosophy of punishing--harsher sentences, more jails and a kick in the pants for drug abusers.
NEWS
May 26, 2002
Re "Wisdom of Officials in Newport Questioned," letters, May 19: Jeffrey C. Metzger describes himself as the "official proponent of Measure F" on the March 2000 ballot. Measure F, a covert attempt to block plans for an airport at El Toro, was labeled a masquerade by the Orange County League of Women Voters and found unconstitutional by the courts. Metzger was, nevertheless, correct when he cautioned Newport officials to be careful what they wished for on the airport planning front.
OPINION
October 14, 2009 | James D. Zirin, James D. Zirin is a New York lawyer and member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He co-hosts the cable talk show "Digital Age."
In May, President Obama completed his long-awaited "cyberspace policy review," concluding that cyberspace is a strategic asset that must be safeguarded from attack as a national security priority. He recalled how hackers had gotten into his own campaign servers, and he worried that crucial infrastructure, public and private, was vulnerable to hackers, cyber terrorists and even other governments. The president promised to appoint a permanent "cyber czar" who would coordinate the work of federal agencies charged with protecting us. But since "acting cyber-security czar" Melissa Hathaway resigned in August, the post has been unfilled.
WORLD
January 24, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Kuwait's ailing Sheik Saad al Abdullah al Sabah is expected to abdicate today, ending a weeklong succession crisis in the oil-producing state, ruling family sources said. Kuwait's powerful Prime Minister Sheik Sabah al Ahmed al Jabbar al Sabah is the likely successor. He had already been running Kuwait's day-to-day affairs for four years, since poor health sidelined both the late emir, Sheik Jabbar al Ahmed al Sabah, and Saad.
OPINION
June 12, 2012
Four years ago, the Supreme Court did its duty as a guardian of the Constitution by ruling that Congress couldn't prevent inmates at Guantanamo Bay from filing petitions for habeas corpus, a venerable feature of Anglo-American law that allows prisoners to challenge their confinement in court. This week, the justices walked away from that responsibility by refusing to review lower court rulings that have narrowed the protections of its 2008 decision to the vanishing point. In granting inmates a right to habeas in Boumediene vs. Bush, the court sternly corrected an overreaching executive and a compliant Congress.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2011 | By Irene Lacher, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Gillian Anderson returns to American television Sunday night as Wallis Simpson in the "Masterpiece Classic" miniseries "Any Human Heart," based on William Boyd's sweeping novel of one man's life spanning the 20th century. The PBS series, also starring Matthew Macfadyen, Jim Broadbent, Hayley Atwell and Kim Cattrall, runs through Feb. 27. Wallis Simpson seems to be everywhere these days. She's also a character in "The King's Speech," although your portrayal of her in "Any Human Heart" was very different.
OPINION
July 26, 2010
Democrats and Republicans validly debate the size and reach of government. But certain services have always been considered fundamental. During California's pioneer days, rudimentary municipal services sprang up when communities of settlers agreed to chip in to provide common law enforcement, fire protection and, usually, basic public education. In the latest efforts to close the gaps in public budgets, though, an increasing number of California cities are ripping holes in the fabric of local government.
OPINION
June 21, 2010
The Supreme Court has in some cases been willing to temper the excesses of the war on terror, most notably in ruling that inmates at Guantanamo have the right to challenge their confinement in U.S. courts. But last week, it fell down on the job when it refused to consider the case of Maher Arar, the victim of an egregious and shocking violation of rights by the U.S. government In September 2002, Arar, a dual Canadian Syrian citizen, was detained while changing planes at New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport, based on inaccurate Canadian intelligence linking him to terrorists.
SPORTS
December 15, 2009 | T.J. Simers
I was scheduled to be off Monday, eating breakfast at the Mini Gourmet in Yorba Linda, relaxed and reading the paper before spitting out my pancakes. Why am I reading about a 16-year-old girl about to sail around the world all by herself when I should be reading about her parents being hauled off to counseling or jail? Did you see the story in Monday's sports section? It was outrageous. Ridiculous. Incomprehensible insanity. And Plaschke didn't write it. We've got four pictures and this huge ode to Abby Sunderland , the child's preparations to put her life on the line, and so now we celebrate child abuse in the paper?
OPINION
October 14, 2009 | James D. Zirin, James D. Zirin is a New York lawyer and member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He co-hosts the cable talk show "Digital Age."
In May, President Obama completed his long-awaited "cyberspace policy review," concluding that cyberspace is a strategic asset that must be safeguarded from attack as a national security priority. He recalled how hackers had gotten into his own campaign servers, and he worried that crucial infrastructure, public and private, was vulnerable to hackers, cyber terrorists and even other governments. The president promised to appoint a permanent "cyber czar" who would coordinate the work of federal agencies charged with protecting us. But since "acting cyber-security czar" Melissa Hathaway resigned in August, the post has been unfilled.
WORLD
April 23, 2009 | Paul Richter and Mubashir Zaidi
Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton warned in unusually bleak terms Wednesday that Pakistan's fragile government is facing an "existential threat" from Islamic militants who are now operating within a few hours of the capital. Clinton told a House committee that the government in Islamabad is ceding territory and "basically abdicating to the Taliban and the extremists" in signing a deal that limits the government's involvement in the war-torn Swat Valley.
OPINION
October 12, 2007
Re "The price of secrecy," editorial, Oct. 11 It is incredible that a citizen of Germany says he was kidnapped by U.S. government agents, abused and transported to Afghanistan for torture in a secret prison, then dumped on an Albanian hillside five months later when the agents realized he was not the right person. This sounds more like the behavior of Nazi Germany or Augusto Pinochet's Chile.
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