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Abdul Haq

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NEWS
October 28, 2001 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ambush was nearly perfect. The Taliban militiamen waited in the dark as their prey, 19 men with only four rifles among them, picked their way through a narrow canyon in the mountains of eastern Afghanistan's Logar province. Then they opened fire into the night.
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OPINION
November 4, 2001 | ROBERT KAPLAN, Robert D. Kaplan, the author of "Soldiers of God: Journeys With Islamic Warriors in Afghanistan and Pakistan," covered the Afghan-Soviet war
Abdul Haq, a leading Pushtun commander against the Soviets in Afghanistan in the 1980s, was executed last month by the Taliban. He would have figured prominently in any post-Taliban government in Kabul and was among the most interesting political-cultural figures to emerge in the greater Middle East in many years. He combined a deep religiosity with a rich tribal tradition, a startling analytical mind and an expert knowledge of the West.
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OPINION
November 4, 2001 | ROBERT KAPLAN, Robert D. Kaplan, the author of "Soldiers of God: Journeys With Islamic Warriors in Afghanistan and Pakistan," covered the Afghan-Soviet war
Abdul Haq, a leading Pushtun commander against the Soviets in Afghanistan in the 1980s, was executed last month by the Taliban. He would have figured prominently in any post-Taliban government in Kabul and was among the most interesting political-cultural figures to emerge in the greater Middle East in many years. He combined a deep religiosity with a rich tribal tradition, a startling analytical mind and an expert knowledge of the West.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2001 | KIMI YOSHINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 150 Southern California Afghans gathered in Santa Ana on Sunday to pay tribute to an assassinated leader of the rebel Northern Alliance at a religious ceremony marking the 40th day after his burial. Many who attended the service for Ahmed Shah Masoud, who was one of the leaders in the military fight against the Taliban, said it will take more than his assassination and the execution of a second hero just three days ago, to defeat them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2001 | KIMI YOSHINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 150 Southern California Afghans gathered in Santa Ana on Sunday to pay tribute to an assassinated leader of the rebel Northern Alliance at a religious ceremony marking the 40th day after his burial. Many who attended the service for Ahmed Shah Masoud, who was one of the leaders in the military fight against the Taliban, said it will take more than his assassination and the execution of a second hero just three days ago, to defeat them.
NEWS
October 27, 2001 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a soldier, Abdul Haq took risks that few others would and he came out alive each time. He understood war. It was the dirty work of peacemaking that appalled him, and it ultimately cost the war hero his life. Haq was a rare character in the cutthroat world of Afghan politics, a veteran of the moujahedeen uprising against Soviet occupation who refused to join the warlords in carving up the country after the Soviets pulled out in 1989.
NEWS
October 27, 2001 | TYLER MARSHALL and RONE TEMPEST and RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a major setback to the U.S. anti-terrorism campaign, Afghanistan's Taliban regime on Friday executed a prominent opposition military commander who had secretly entered the country on a mission to gain support for a new government. The Taliban's Bakhtar News Agency reported that Afghan war hero Abdul Haq had been arrested near his home village of Azra southeast of the capital, Kabul, on Thursday evening after being stalked for two days by Taliban militia units.
NEWS
October 1, 2001 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Abdul Haq's medals are his many battle scars, but after he helped win the war to liberate Afghanistan from Soviet occupation, he suffered his worst pain in the struggle for a lasting peace. Two years ago, when the former guerrilla fighter was trying to persuade Afghans to end their relentless civil war, a pair of masked gunmen scaled the wall of his home in this city near the Afghan border and killed his wife and 11-year-old son and their bodyguard.
WORLD
April 22, 2012 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
JACOBABAD, Pakistan — Rachna Kumari, 16, was shopping for dresses in this city's dust-choked bazaar when it happened. The man who her family says abducted her was not a street thug. He was a police officer. Nor was he a stranger. Rachna's family knew and trusted him. He guarded the Hindu temple run by her father, an important duty in a society where Hindus are often terrorized by Muslim extremists, and he had helped Rachna cram for her ninth-grade final exams. After she disappeared from the market, he did not demand a ransom.
NEWS
March 15, 1989 | From Times wire services
A bomb went off today at the British Council Library, tearing a two-foot hole in the roof. A library official linked the blast to Muslim outrage over Salman Rushdie's novel "The Satanic Verses." No one was injured. All 12 employees had left the building at the time of the explosion, which occurred shortly before 9 p.m. Abdul Haq, a library official, said the library had no warning of the attack. However, he noted that British establishments have been on alert because of threats against Rushdie.
NEWS
October 28, 2001 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ambush was nearly perfect. The Taliban militiamen waited in the dark as their prey, 19 men with only four rifles among them, picked their way through a narrow canyon in the mountains of eastern Afghanistan's Logar province. Then they opened fire into the night.
NEWS
October 27, 2001 | TYLER MARSHALL and RONE TEMPEST and RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a major setback to the U.S. anti-terrorism campaign, Afghanistan's Taliban regime on Friday executed a prominent opposition military commander who had secretly entered the country on a mission to gain support for a new government. The Taliban's Bakhtar News Agency reported that Afghan war hero Abdul Haq had been arrested near his home village of Azra southeast of the capital, Kabul, on Thursday evening after being stalked for two days by Taliban militia units.
NEWS
October 27, 2001 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a soldier, Abdul Haq took risks that few others would and he came out alive each time. He understood war. It was the dirty work of peacemaking that appalled him, and it ultimately cost the war hero his life. Haq was a rare character in the cutthroat world of Afghan politics, a veteran of the moujahedeen uprising against Soviet occupation who refused to join the warlords in carving up the country after the Soviets pulled out in 1989.
NEWS
October 1, 2001 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Abdul Haq's medals are his many battle scars, but after he helped win the war to liberate Afghanistan from Soviet occupation, he suffered his worst pain in the struggle for a lasting peace. Two years ago, when the former guerrilla fighter was trying to persuade Afghans to end their relentless civil war, a pair of masked gunmen scaled the wall of his home in this city near the Afghan border and killed his wife and 11-year-old son and their bodyguard.
NEWS
October 27, 2001
ANTHRAX Top U.S. health officials said they think there is at least one more anthrax-tainted letter yet to be discovered in Washington and that it probably caused the life-threatening illness of a State Department mail worker. MILITARY FRONT In a setback to the U.S. anti-terrorism campaign, the Taliban captured and killed Afghan war hero Abdul Haq, a prominent opposition military commander who had secretly entered the country to gain support for a new government.
WORLD
March 10, 2009 | Associated Press
Four youths were publicly whipped in the Somali capital Monday after an Islamic court found them guilty of gang rape, underscoring the government's inability to administer justice in the war-ravaged nation. Judge Abdul Haq insisted that the punishment would deter other would-be rapists, but two of the youths smiled and laughed as they were punished. The lashing was administered over the clothes of the accused and did not break their skin.
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