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Abdul Qadeer Khan

OPINION
February 24, 2006 | On the Web For more letters see www.latimes.com/letters.
Re "GOP Allies Abandon Bush in Fight Over Arab Port Deal," Feb. 23 President Bush has only himself to blame for the strong reaction to the port deal. He has drummed into us a fear of everything Arab and a belief that national security is at stake in everything, so it's no wonder we are shocked and awed that his administration would approve a contract with an Arab country. BARBARA GEHRKE Sylmar Are the congressional Republicans threatening legislation to block the president from approving the sale of port operations to the United Arab Emirates the same ones who claim to have no power to stop the president from ordering illegal wiretaps?
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WORLD
January 24, 2004 | From Reuters
Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf said Friday that Pakistani scientists apparently sold nuclear secrets abroad "for personal financial gain" but that the government was unaware of the sales at the time. Pakistan says it began questioning its nuclear scientists, including the father of its atomic bomb, Abdul Qadeer Khan, after the U.N.'s International Atomic Energy Agency began investigating possible links between the Pakistani and Iranian nuclear programs.
WORLD
February 16, 2004 | From Associated Press
Drawings of a nuclear warhead that Libya surrendered as part of its decision to renounce weapons of mass destruction are of 1960s Chinese design, but probably came from Pakistan, diplomats and experts said Sunday. China is widely assumed to have been Pakistan's key supplier of much of the clandestine nuclear technology used to establish Islamabad as a nuclear power in 1998 and resold to governments through the black-market network headed by Pakistani scientist Abdul Qadeer Khan.
WORLD
November 21, 2005 | From Associated Press
Raising the stakes before a key vote by the U.N. nuclear agency, Iranian lawmakers approved a bill Sunday requiring the government to block inspections of atomic facilities if the agency refers Iran to the Security Council for possible sanctions. The bill was favored by 183 of the 197 parliament members present.
WORLD
December 25, 2003 | Mubashir Zaidi, Special to The Times
After months of wrangling, Pakistan's president, Gen. Pervez Musharraf, announced Wednesday that he would give up his general's uniform in a year in exchange for the main opposition alliance's support of his rule until 2007. In a televised address to the nation, Musharraf said he would step down as head of Pakistan's army in December 2004 as part of a deal struck with an alliance of Islamic hard-liners, the Muttahida Majlis-i-Amal.
OPINION
February 9, 2004
Pakistan's clandestine sharing of nuclear plans and technology with the likes of North Korea and Libya has been exposed, but that should not end tough questions from Washington and international weapons inspectors. Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf loaded his country's nuclear proliferation sins onto the shoulders of the nation's premier nuclear scientist, Abdul Qadeer Khan, last week and then pardoned Khan, who is revered as a national hero.
WORLD
February 8, 2008 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
Iran is testing an advanced centrifuge designed to more swiftly produce enriched uranium in defiance of Security Council resolutions ordering it to stop, diplomats confirmed Thursday. The centrifuges are still in the early testing stages, and are not being used to enrich nuclear material, said diplomats familiar with information from the International Atomic Energy Agency.
WORLD
May 29, 2004 | Douglas Frantz, Times Staff Writer
International inspectors said in a confidential report Friday that they had discovered traces of uranium suitable for nuclear weapons in Libya that were similar to contamination found last year in Iran. The International Atomic Energy Agency said in the report that small particles of weapons-grade uranium were found on components for centrifuges, which are used to enrich uranium for nuclear reactors or bombs.
OPINION
February 17, 2005 | Graham Allison, Graham Allison, director of the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government, is author of "Nuclear Terrorism: The Ultimate Preventable Catastrophe" (Times Books, 2004).
If North Korea has, in fact, assembled an arsenal of six or eight nuclear weapons, so what? Well, for one thing, North Korea's forced entry into the nuclear club is likely to trigger a "cascade" of nuclear proliferation -- as the U.N. High-Level Panel on Threats, Challenges and Change termed it -- in Northeast Asia. To be sure, in the weeks ahead, Japan and South Korea will publicly reaffirm their nonnuclear status, but privately, officials there are almost certainly discussing their options.
OPINION
January 15, 2005
Re "Just Another General," editorial, Jan. 9: It is about time that a newspaper has finally taken a stand against Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf's illegitimate regime. A man who has come to power through a military coup and then spuriously justified his presidency by rigging two elections is no friend of democracy. I find it ironic that Washington invades countries and spends billions of dollars just to "spread democracy," yet overlooks Pakistan's dictatorship. I agree 100% with your profound statement that "the best thing for Pakistan now would be for him to let the [Pakistan People's Party]
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