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Abdul Qadeer Khan

OPINION
April 4, 2004
The hostile and mendacious positions projected in Leon Hadar's April 1 commentary shocked us in the way he portrayed and questioned Pakistan President Pervez Musharraf's bona fides in his commitment to fight and oust Al Qaeda and the Taliban from Pakistan, and in his handling of Dr. Abdul Qadeer Khan's mercenary trade in nuclear technology. He failed to argue that without Musharraf's support to oust the Taliban from Kabul and Pakistan's great human and military sacrifices, the coalition's war against terror would have gone nowhere, not to mention the fact that for his support of the U.S., Musharraf came within a hair of losing his life to two assassination attempts.
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WORLD
February 24, 2004 | From Associated Press
Malaysia's opposition accused Prime Minister Abdullah Ahmad Badawi on Monday of trying to shield his son from an investigation into a company's role in making nuclear parts for Libya. The opposition demanded a full parliamentary inquiry after a police probe cleared a company controlled by Abdullah's son of knowing involvement in the nuclear trafficking network of Pakistani scientist Abdul Qadeer Khan.
OPINION
October 25, 2004
Re "Iran Moving Methodically Toward Nuclear Capability," Oct. 21: Why is this article even being printed? Are we being prepared for the next preemptive attack against Iran? None of the diplomats or officials will even put their name with the charges they're making against Iran. They already cried wolf once. If the International Atomic Energy Agency is correct in its assessment of Pakistani scientist Abdul Qadeer Khan selling nuclear components, then that's the guy we should be after.
WORLD
May 1, 2006 | From the Associated Press
A senior scientist suspected of helping sell nuclear weapons technology to Iran, Libya and North Korea has been released after two years in detention, the army said Sunday. Mohammed Farooq, who worked at Pakistan's top nuclear weapons facility, Khan Research Laboratories, was detained in December 2003 along with 10 others when it was revealed that the head of the facility, Abdul Qadeer Khan, had spread sensitive technology on the international black market.
OPINION
February 24, 2006 | On the Web For more letters see www.latimes.com/letters.
Re "GOP Allies Abandon Bush in Fight Over Arab Port Deal," Feb. 23 President Bush has only himself to blame for the strong reaction to the port deal. He has drummed into us a fear of everything Arab and a belief that national security is at stake in everything, so it's no wonder we are shocked and awed that his administration would approve a contract with an Arab country. BARBARA GEHRKE Sylmar Are the congressional Republicans threatening legislation to block the president from approving the sale of port operations to the United Arab Emirates the same ones who claim to have no power to stop the president from ordering illegal wiretaps?
WORLD
January 24, 2004 | From Reuters
Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf said Friday that Pakistani scientists apparently sold nuclear secrets abroad "for personal financial gain" but that the government was unaware of the sales at the time. Pakistan says it began questioning its nuclear scientists, including the father of its atomic bomb, Abdul Qadeer Khan, after the U.N.'s International Atomic Energy Agency began investigating possible links between the Pakistani and Iranian nuclear programs.
WORLD
February 16, 2004 | From Associated Press
Drawings of a nuclear warhead that Libya surrendered as part of its decision to renounce weapons of mass destruction are of 1960s Chinese design, but probably came from Pakistan, diplomats and experts said Sunday. China is widely assumed to have been Pakistan's key supplier of much of the clandestine nuclear technology used to establish Islamabad as a nuclear power in 1998 and resold to governments through the black-market network headed by Pakistani scientist Abdul Qadeer Khan.
WORLD
November 21, 2005 | From Associated Press
Raising the stakes before a key vote by the U.N. nuclear agency, Iranian lawmakers approved a bill Sunday requiring the government to block inspections of atomic facilities if the agency refers Iran to the Security Council for possible sanctions. The bill was favored by 183 of the 197 parliament members present.
WORLD
December 25, 2003 | Mubashir Zaidi, Special to The Times
After months of wrangling, Pakistan's president, Gen. Pervez Musharraf, announced Wednesday that he would give up his general's uniform in a year in exchange for the main opposition alliance's support of his rule until 2007. In a televised address to the nation, Musharraf said he would step down as head of Pakistan's army in December 2004 as part of a deal struck with an alliance of Islamic hard-liners, the Muttahida Majlis-i-Amal.
OPINION
February 9, 2004
Pakistan's clandestine sharing of nuclear plans and technology with the likes of North Korea and Libya has been exposed, but that should not end tough questions from Washington and international weapons inspectors. Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf loaded his country's nuclear proliferation sins onto the shoulders of the nation's premier nuclear scientist, Abdul Qadeer Khan, last week and then pardoned Khan, who is revered as a national hero.
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