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Abdul Qadeer Khan

OPINION
January 15, 2005
Re "Just Another General," editorial, Jan. 9: It is about time that a newspaper has finally taken a stand against Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf's illegitimate regime. A man who has come to power through a military coup and then spuriously justified his presidency by rigging two elections is no friend of democracy. I find it ironic that Washington invades countries and spends billions of dollars just to "spread democracy," yet overlooks Pakistan's dictatorship. I agree 100% with your profound statement that "the best thing for Pakistan now would be for him to let the [Pakistan People's Party]
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WORLD
December 23, 2003 | Douglas Frantz, Times Staff Writer
Pakistani authorities said Monday that they were questioning Abdul Qadeer Khan, the father of Pakistan's atomic bomb, about possible links between the nuclear programs in their country and Iran. The interrogation comes after diplomats said last month that the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna was investigating information provided by Iran that linked some Pakistanis to Tehran's nuclear program.
OPINION
February 17, 2005 | Graham Allison, Graham Allison, director of the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government, is author of "Nuclear Terrorism: The Ultimate Preventable Catastrophe" (Times Books, 2004).
If North Korea has, in fact, assembled an arsenal of six or eight nuclear weapons, so what? Well, for one thing, North Korea's forced entry into the nuclear club is likely to trigger a "cascade" of nuclear proliferation -- as the U.N. High-Level Panel on Threats, Challenges and Change termed it -- in Northeast Asia. To be sure, in the weeks ahead, Japan and South Korea will publicly reaffirm their nonnuclear status, but privately, officials there are almost certainly discussing their options.
WORLD
May 24, 2004 | Josh Meyer, Times Staff Writer
As they race to dismantle a global black market in nuclear weapons components, U.S. authorities are focusing on an unusual case: an Orthodox Jew from Israel accused of trying to sell nuclear weapons parts to a business associate in Islamic Pakistan. Asher Karni, 50, currently a resident of South Africa, was arrested at Denver's international airport as he arrived with his wife and daughter for a New Year's ski vacation.
WORLD
May 26, 2005 | Douglas Frantz, Times Staff Writer
The International Atomic Energy Agency confirmed that Pakistan turned over uranium enrichment components Wednesday that could help solve one of the biggest mysteries in the inquiry on Iran's disputed nuclear program. Centrifuge components and uranium samples were flown from Pakistan to Vienna and handed over to the IAEA at its main laboratory, where they will be compared with suspicious traces of enriched uranium discovered in 2003 in Iran.
OPINION
January 9, 2005
On Sept. 11, 2001, the main protector of the Taliban -- and Al Qaeda -- outside Afghanistan was the government of next-door Pakistan. But by the next day, President Pervez Musharraf had responded to Washington's "with us or against us" ultimatum by throwing in with the United States. Sort of. Musharraf then had been running Pakistan for two years, having seized power in a coup.
OPINION
March 2, 2007
HERE WE GO AGAIN. Or do we? In 2002, the U.S. accused North Korea of having a secret program to enrich uranium for nuclear bombs. Alleging that the North had cheated on a deal agreed to eight years earlier, Washington cut off heavy fuel oil shipments. In response, Pyongyang accused the Bush administration of reneging on the deal, fired up its mothballed plutonium plant and, last fall, detonated an atomic bomb. Only now are U.S.
WORLD
February 12, 2004 | Mubashir Zaidi, Special to The Times
The government Wednesday formally accused four civilians and three retired military officers of helping pass components and plans for making nuclear weapons to Iran, Libya and North Korea. The scientists and former officers at Pakistan's main nuclear weapons lab were part of a black-market operation led by Abdul Qadeer Khan, the former head of Khan Research Laboratories, the government alleged in a written reply to a high court justice.
WORLD
April 29, 2004 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
The Security Council unanimously adopted a resolution Wednesday requiring all nations to pass laws to help prevent the spread of weapons of mass destruction to terrorist groups. President Bush called on the United Nations in September to patch the holes in international treaties that don't cover black marketeers and rogue groups dealing in parts and technology for nuclear, chemical and biological weapons.
WORLD
March 13, 2004 | Douglas Frantz, Times Staff Writer
Iran took a step Friday toward confrontation with the United Nations nuclear watchdog by abruptly postponing a crucial round of inspections aimed at determining whether Tehran is trying to build a nuclear weapon. Next week's planned visit by inspectors from the U.N.'s International Atomic Energy Agency will be delayed for more than a month at the request of Iranian officials, said a diplomat close to the Vienna-based agency.
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