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Abdul Sattar Edhi

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NEWS
March 30, 1993 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is before dawn, and Abdul Sattar Edhi and his wife are trying to brighten the darkness of one of the world's poorest cities. Rolling off his rope cot, Edhi walks into the next room to bathe the body of a small boy, found dead in the gutter and brought here by police. Later his wife, Bilquis, appears from another room to wash and wrap an old woman's thin corpse in white shrouds and send it to a nearby mosque for funeral prayers. Soon the 61-year-old Edhi is at his cluttered desk.
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WORLD
October 4, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
He owns a single set of clothing and often sleeps in a storage room — even though millions of dollars pass through his hands annually. At 83, creature comforts don't matter much to Abdul Sattar Edhi. He is far too busy caring for the sick, feeding the hungry, burying the dead. Known to some as Pakistan's Mother Teresa, Edhi is a humanitarian light in a violent and troubled land. The vast majority here struggle daily in a moribund economy. Natural disasters are common. Poverty, political instability, corruption, and attacks by Islamic militants, criminals and political enforcers are facts of life.
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WORLD
October 4, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
He owns a single set of clothing and often sleeps in a storage room — even though millions of dollars pass through his hands annually. At 83, creature comforts don't matter much to Abdul Sattar Edhi. He is far too busy caring for the sick, feeding the hungry, burying the dead. Known to some as Pakistan's Mother Teresa, Edhi is a humanitarian light in a violent and troubled land. The vast majority here struggle daily in a moribund economy. Natural disasters are common. Poverty, political instability, corruption, and attacks by Islamic militants, criminals and political enforcers are facts of life.
NEWS
March 30, 1993 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is before dawn, and Abdul Sattar Edhi and his wife are trying to brighten the darkness of one of the world's poorest cities. Rolling off his rope cot, Edhi walks into the next room to bathe the body of a small boy, found dead in the gutter and brought here by police. Later his wife, Bilquis, appears from another room to wash and wrap an old woman's thin corpse in white shrouds and send it to a nearby mosque for funeral prayers. Soon the 61-year-old Edhi is at his cluttered desk.
NEWS
February 3, 1991 | From Associated Press
Rescuers struggled through waist-deep snow on Saturday to reach people trapped by an earthquake that killed at least 300 people and injured more than 500 others, officials said. Hundreds of people were believed trapped in remote mountain villages where straw and mud huts were flattened by the powerful 6.8 quake, which rumbled across Afghanistan and Pakistan on Friday.
WORLD
February 24, 2003 | From Times Wire Services
An Afghan government minister and three of his officials were among eight people aboard a chartered Cessna aircraft that crashed soon after taking off here early today, an official of the charter firm said. Juma Mohammad Mohammadi, the Afghan minister for petroleum and mines, was aboard the flight, along with an official of Pakistan's Foreign Ministry and Sun Chang Feng, chief executive of MCC Resource Development Co.
NEWS
October 21, 1990 | DAVID ALEXANDER, UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL
It's not a lesson anybody would want to teach a child, but for Shakir Hussein Shah making a grab for somebody's wallet--and getting caught--may have been the best move he made in his 13 years. Having no suitable facilities for the youth, the police handed Shah over to a privately run home for boys. Now he lives in a dormitory with other youngsters, attends school at the home and is being trained as an electrician.
NEWS
November 20, 1994 | GREG MYRE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When Karachi's top official gets to the office, his sleeves are rolled up, his phones are ringing furiously and dozens of men are waiting in the sweltering hall to ask urgent favors. There are no easy days for Faheem Khan as he tries to save one of the world's most troubled cities. "I'm surprised myself sometimes how the city carries on with all its problems," Khan said in an interview with the Associated Press. "We have unemployment, crime and pollution.
WORLD
October 18, 2005 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
Relief officials and local government leaders in northern Pakistan have reported dramatically higher death tolls from the devastating Oct. 8 earthquake, with estimates reaching 100,000, the army's chief spokesman said Monday. The government has decided against revising its official estimate of 38,000 killed until its relief coordinator completes a survey, but it acknowledges that the final toll is likely to be much higher, said the spokesman, Maj. Gen. Shaukat Sultan.
NEWS
December 31, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The garrulous, mustachioed man sipping tea at the breakfast buffet in the Pearl Continental Hotel is without a doubt the highest flier among the leaders of the world's major cities. Literally. After all, one reason (probably the reason) Faheem Zaman got the job was his experience piloting Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto around Pakistan in a Bell Jet Ranger helicopter. Modestly, he notes on terra firma, he was not her first choice.
NEWS
October 17, 1988 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
It was a typical Thursday night in one of the strangest, most deeply troubled cities in Asia. Half the city was under curfew, as it often is these days, yet thousands of people flooded into the sprawling, seaside amusement park called Funland for a few hours of healthy recreation. Fundamentalist Muslim women clad in black from head to foot squealed with glee as they were whipped around on a ride known as the "Red Baron."
NEWS
November 27, 1988 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
They're tearing down Rawalpindi Central Jail. Where the gallows stood for more than a century, there now is just a deep hole in the ground, a nondescript marker for the device of dictatorship that unceremoniously dispatched former Prime Minister Zulfikar Ali Bhutto just after 3 a.m. on April 4, 1979. On the site of the dank death row jailhouse that was the final home for Bhutto and hundreds of others, scavengers now hunt for bricks and scrap, and goats graze lazily in the winter sun.
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