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Abdullah Abdullah

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WORLD
October 21, 2009 | Paul Richter and Laura King
Bowing to intense international pressure, Afghan President Hamid Karzai agreed today to a runoff next month with his main challenger in August's disputed presidential election. "This is for the good of our country," the Afghan leader, looking pale but composed, told a packed news conference at his presidential palace. The announcement of a Nov. 7 runoff contest came 24 hours after a U.N.-backed panel investigating charges of fraud in the August balloting invalidated nearly a million votes cast for Karzai, stripping him what his camp had declared was a solid first-round victory.
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WORLD
April 26, 2014 | By Hashmat Baktash and Shashank Bengali
KABUL, Afghanistan -- The Afghan presidential race is set for a June runoff between former foreign minister Abdullah Abdullah and former World Bank economist Ashraf Ghani, according to official results released Saturday. The preliminary tally showed Abdullah winning nearly 45% of the 6.9 million votes cast, and Ghani 31.5%. Election officials will examine hundreds of reports of voting irregularities before issuing final results on May 14, but the allegations didn't appear widespread enough to change the results substantially -- or to give Abdullah the absolute majority needed to avoid a runoff.
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WORLD
October 25, 2009 | Laura King
Afghanistan's runoff presidential campaign formally opened today with an ominous repeat from the first round: Taliban threats to disrupt the vote. "If anyone finds themselves injured taking part in this dirty process, they have only themselves to blame," the insurgent movement said in a statement posted on its Pashtu-language website. It also denounced the election two weeks from now as a foreign-orchestrated sham. The original Aug. 20 balloting, Afghanistan's second-ever direct presidential election, was marked by violence, mainly scattered on voting day itself but preceded by several weeks of concerted attacks, including major bombings in the capital, Kabul.
WORLD
April 13, 2014 | By Hashmat Baktash and Shashank Bengali
KABUL, Afghanistan -- Afghanistan on Sunday released the first preliminary results in its presidential election, which showed a close race between former foreign minister Abdullah Abdullah and former World Bank economist Ashraf Ghani, with neither man close to an outright majority. Abdullah had 41.9% of the vote, Ghani had 37.6% and Zalmai Rassoul, a longtime advisor to outgoing President Hamid Karzai, was a distant third with 9.8%. The tally, based on 507,000 votes out of an estimated 7 million cast, matched preelection polls that suggested Abdullah and Ghani were the front-runners in the field of eight candidates.
WORLD
September 17, 2009 | Mark Magnier
Abdullah Abdullah is waiting. As is much of Afghanistan. With the nation approaching the one-month mark since its Aug. 20 presidential election there are growing concerns at home and abroad that the delay in results and allegations of fraud could increase political instability. But the former foreign minister, who earned the second-largest number of votes, hasn't been sitting on his hands. These days, he spends much of his time trying to focus attention on the perceived irregularities and slamming the record of his political rival, incumbent President Hamid Karzai.
WORLD
September 25, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
An election official warned that Afghanistan had a two-week window in October to hold any presidential runoff before winter snows arrived -- a somber reminder of how minor delays could leave a power vacuum well into next year. Preliminary results from Afghanistan's Aug. 20 vote show President Hamid Karzai winning outright with 54.6%. But if enough votes are found to be fraudulent from an election mired in allegations of ballot stuffing and voter coercion, Karzai could dip below the 50% threshold needed to avoid a runoff with challenger Abdullah Abdullah.
OPINION
October 10, 2009
Re "Afghans say U.S. is off track," Oct. 1 Excellent article. As an old anthropology/linguistics undergrad back in the late '50s, I agree with the Afghans' opinions. I sure hope President Obama has smart enough advisors to realize all of the complexities; we should talk with Afghans and the Taliban -- unlike Bush's team. Lance Fogan Valencia :: Mark Magnier's article got it right. In order to be successful, the allied effort in Afghanistan must rely on input from the knowledge, wants and needs of the average people.
WORLD
April 13, 2014 | By Hashmat Baktash and Shashank Bengali
KABUL, Afghanistan -- Afghanistan on Sunday released the first preliminary results in its presidential election, which showed a close race between former foreign minister Abdullah Abdullah and former World Bank economist Ashraf Ghani, with neither man close to an outright majority. Abdullah had 41.9% of the vote, Ghani had 37.6% and Zalmai Rassoul, a longtime advisor to outgoing President Hamid Karzai, was a distant third with 9.8%. The tally, based on 507,000 votes out of an estimated 7 million cast, matched preelection polls that suggested Abdullah and Ghani were the front-runners in the field of eight candidates.
WORLD
August 27, 2009 | Associated Press
President Hamid Karzai extended his lead over his top challenger in Afghanistan's presidential election, new vote results showed Wednesday, but remains short of the 50% threshold that would allow him to avoid a two-man runoff. Afghan election officials are slowly releasing results from last week's presidential election, and final certified results will not be ready until at least mid-September, after dozens of serious complaints of fraud have been investigated. Low turnout and the fraud allegations have cast a pall over the vote, seen as crucial to efforts to stabilize the country, which is racked by Taliban insurgents and doubts over its fragile democracy.
WORLD
April 26, 2014 | By Hashmat Baktash and Shashank Bengali
KABUL, Afghanistan -- The Afghan presidential race is set for a June runoff between former foreign minister Abdullah Abdullah and former World Bank economist Ashraf Ghani, according to official results released Saturday. The preliminary tally showed Abdullah winning nearly 45% of the 6.9 million votes cast, and Ghani 31.5%. Election officials will examine hundreds of reports of voting irregularities before issuing final results on May 14, but the allegations didn't appear widespread enough to change the results substantially -- or to give Abdullah the absolute majority needed to avoid a runoff.
WORLD
April 3, 2014 | By Shashank Bengali
KABUL, Afghanistan - The last time Abdullah Abdullah ran for president of Afghanistan the election devolved into a bloody farce. Votes cast in some areas in 2009 exceeded the number of voters. One in 5 ballots nationwide was tossed out because of fraud. Thirty-one people died in insurgent attacks. Days before a runoff against President Hamid Karzai, Abdullah withdrew from the race, fearing more fraud in the incumbent's favor. Five years later, the Karzai era is ending, as is the dominant role of the United States in Afghan life.
WORLD
November 24, 2010 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Afghanistan's main electoral body on Wednesday released what were billed as the final results of September's trouble-plagued parliamentary election. But as with so many things here, final doesn't mean over with. Results for one of the country's 34 provinces -- Ghazni, south of the capital, Kabul -- were withheld because violence, intimidation and fraud were considered so rampant that election officials decided a fair tally was impossible. Even as the Independent Election Commission was announcing the rest of the results, supporters of some candidates who had been disqualified days earlier by a watchdog body staged angry street demonstrations in Kabul and elsewhere.
WORLD
November 2, 2009 | Alexandra Zavis
President Hamid Karzai's only challenger today pulled out of next week's election runoff, saying the incumbent had turned down his demand for changes to prevent the rampant fraud that marred the first round of voting in August. The withdrawal of former Foreign Minister Abdullah Abdullah threw into disarray a vote that U.S. officials and their allies had hoped would produce a credible partner in the fight against Taliban and Al Qaeda insurgents. Azizullah Lodin, head of the government-appointed Independent Election Commission, said the panel would have to consult lawyers before deciding whether to proceed with Saturday's vote with just one candidate.
WORLD
October 28, 2009 | Alexandra Zavis and Julian E. Barnes
Eight U.S. troops were killed today in multiple bombings in southern Afghanistan, the military said, making October the deadliest month for Americans of the eight-year war. The latest deaths bring the number of U.S. service members killed during the month to at least 53, according to the independent website icasualties.org. Today's deaths occurred in "multiple, complex" bombings in the south, the military said in a news release. No further details were provided. An Afghan civilian working with the International Security Assistance Force, or ISAF, in Afghanistan was also killed, and several service members were injured in the incidents, the military said.
OPINION
October 28, 2009
Re "Push for troops on a deadly day," Oct. 27, and "Nobody wins in the Afghan runoff election," Opinion, Oct. 21, and "The Afghan trap," Opinion, Oct. 20 Sending more troops to Afghanistan will increase the killing, not only of our own troops but of the Afghan people as well, simply because we are still there. After bombing and killing arguably tens of thousands of Iraqi civilians and still counting, when are we going to realize that we cause more deaths by occupying these countries than by minding our own business?
WORLD
October 25, 2009 | Laura King
Afghanistan's runoff presidential campaign formally opened today with an ominous repeat from the first round: Taliban threats to disrupt the vote. "If anyone finds themselves injured taking part in this dirty process, they have only themselves to blame," the insurgent movement said in a statement posted on its Pashtu-language website. It also denounced the election two weeks from now as a foreign-orchestrated sham. The original Aug. 20 balloting, Afghanistan's second-ever direct presidential election, was marked by violence, mainly scattered on voting day itself but preceded by several weeks of concerted attacks, including major bombings in the capital, Kabul.
OPINION
October 28, 2009
Re "Push for troops on a deadly day," Oct. 27, and "Nobody wins in the Afghan runoff election," Opinion, Oct. 21, and "The Afghan trap," Opinion, Oct. 20 Sending more troops to Afghanistan will increase the killing, not only of our own troops but of the Afghan people as well, simply because we are still there. After bombing and killing arguably tens of thousands of Iraqi civilians and still counting, when are we going to realize that we cause more deaths by occupying these countries than by minding our own business?
WORLD
November 24, 2010 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Afghanistan's main electoral body on Wednesday released what were billed as the final results of September's trouble-plagued parliamentary election. But as with so many things here, final doesn't mean over with. Results for one of the country's 34 provinces -- Ghazni, south of the capital, Kabul -- were withheld because violence, intimidation and fraud were considered so rampant that election officials decided a fair tally was impossible. Even as the Independent Election Commission was announcing the rest of the results, supporters of some candidates who had been disqualified days earlier by a watchdog body staged angry street demonstrations in Kabul and elsewhere.
WORLD
October 21, 2009 | Paul Richter and Laura King
Bowing to intense international pressure, Afghan President Hamid Karzai agreed today to a runoff next month with his main challenger in August's disputed presidential election. "This is for the good of our country," the Afghan leader, looking pale but composed, told a packed news conference at his presidential palace. The announcement of a Nov. 7 runoff contest came 24 hours after a U.N.-backed panel investigating charges of fraud in the August balloting invalidated nearly a million votes cast for Karzai, stripping him what his camp had declared was a solid first-round victory.
OPINION
October 10, 2009
Re "Afghans say U.S. is off track," Oct. 1 Excellent article. As an old anthropology/linguistics undergrad back in the late '50s, I agree with the Afghans' opinions. I sure hope President Obama has smart enough advisors to realize all of the complexities; we should talk with Afghans and the Taliban -- unlike Bush's team. Lance Fogan Valencia :: Mark Magnier's article got it right. In order to be successful, the allied effort in Afghanistan must rely on input from the knowledge, wants and needs of the average people.
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