Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAbdurrahman Wahid
IN THE NEWS

Abdurrahman Wahid

NEWS
June 30, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This country's honeymoon with its president has faded fast as Indonesians confront a sobering reality: Abdurrahman Wahid cannot make the sun rise in the West. Numbed by renewed student protests, sectarian bloodshed and economic woes, many of the same people who cheered the October election of the populist Muslim cleric now are calling for his impeachment. They point to his unpredictability, his Lone Ranger style of decision-making, his inattention to detail.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 9, 2000 |
Reformist President Abdurrahman Wahid has revoked two laws that for decades gave Indonesia's military sweeping powers to carry out checks of senior politicians and bureaucrats. The intelligence body within the military and a law that gave it power to investigate the backgrounds of all members of parliament and senior government officials were no longer needed, a Cabinet spokesman said.
NEWS
February 14, 2000 | From Associated Press
In a surprise reversal, President Abdurrahman Wahid on Sunday suspended his powerful security minister, Gen. Wiranto, from the Cabinet over his alleged role in last year's bloodshed in East Timor. Upon his return home after a 16-day foreign tour, Wahid met with Wiranto and said the minister would remain in the government while the attorney general's office conducts an inquiry into the violence that followed East Timor's vote for independence Aug. 30.
NEWS
February 10, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He travels with a Sony Walkman, indulging in his passion for music, particularly Beethoven's Ninth Symphony and Janis Joplin's "Me and Bobby McGee." For a trip to Europe, he took along a CD by Jim Reeves. "He's really gotten into country," says an aide. He attended the top Islamic universities in Iraq and Egypt and managed to flunk out of both. He had to repeat two years of high school because he seldom showed up for class, preferring to spend his time in movie theaters and libraries.
NEWS
October 30, 1999 | By SLOBODAN LEKIC, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Indonesia's new president inaugurated his Cabinet on Friday with a firm warning that the corruption that has infested the country for decades will no longer be tolerated. President Abdurrahman Wahid took office last week, raising hopes that he can continue Indonesia's transition to democracy after more than 30 years of autocratic rule capped by two years of political instability, economic crisis and civil unrest.
NEWS
October 25, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This nation's new president outlined policies Sunday designed to move the world's fourth most populous country more into the Asian mainstream and to establish a formal relationship with Israel. Abdurrahman Wahid, in his first major address since national legislators elected him Wednesday, told businesspeople and diplomats on the resort island of Bali that he will soon visit China and Japan and that economically battered Indonesia cannot survive without outside help.
OPINION
October 24, 1999 | Andrew MacIntyre, Andrew MacIntyre is associate professor at the Graduate School of International Relations and Pacific Studies at UC San Diego
Last week's surprise election of Muslim cleric Abdurrahman Wahid as president of Indonesia marks the beginning of a dramatic new chapter in that country's development. Inside and outside Indonesia, questions are swirling: How did this largely overlooked figure make it to the top? What does it mean that the expected winner, Megawati Sukarnoputri, will wind up as his deputy? Will Indonesia now be able to find stability and return to economic prosperity?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1999 | PETER DALE SCOTT, Peter Dale Scott, a former Canadian diplomat, is an author and retired UC Berkeley professor
Six months ago, observers feared that Indonesia's transition from military dictatorship to electoral democracy might cause the country to break apart. Today, with the election of moderates as president and vice president, the nation has taken a step toward a stable, constitutional future. Abdurrahman Wahid, the new president, is perhaps the nation's most respected leader.
NEWS
October 22, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Abdurrahman Wahid, Indonesia's unlikely new president, is one of the nation's most respected intellects, a man who loves soccer and Mozart, has a quick sense of humor and often finds himself at odds with the establishment. Born to one of Indonesia's most influential Muslim families, the 59-year-old cleric has long championed human rights, democracy, the separation of church--or mosque--and state, and a tolerant Islam that reaches out to non-Muslims in this diverse society.
NEWS
October 21, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Abdurrahman Wahid, a partly blind and frail Muslim cleric who previously had never run for political office, was elected Indonesia's president Wednesday in a stunning upset that steers the world's fourth most populous nation into uncharted waters. The powerful military immediately said it will support Wahid, who won this nation's first free presidential election in 44 years and was quickly sworn in. Wahid's defeated rival, Megawati Sukarnoputri, called on her supporters to respect the result.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|