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Aborigines

ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1992 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Guillermo Gomez-Pena stroked his mustache, pulled on a cigarette and offered an assessment of the work. "This kind of art is not uplifting," he said, waving his hand in a dismissive motion. "It's propaganda. It's incriminating." The work in question was his own, but the opinion was not.
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NEWS
September 20, 1987 | ROBERT WOODWARD, Reuters
A High Court judge wept as he listened to harrowing accounts of racism against Aborigines in Australia's outback towns. "I have been to Soweto in South Africa, to German concentration camps, but this is my own country," he exclaimed after trudging through ankle-deep mud to inspect 40 hovels, home to 500 Aborigines in the Toomelah settlement in New South Wales.
SPORTS
August 5, 1997 | MIKE PENNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Instead of a test pattern on their television screens at 4 a.m., Australians trained their bleary eyes Monday on the red, black and yellow geometric designs of the aboriginal flag, as seen live from Greece in mid-victory celebration. Australians were up and tuned in before dawn because halfway around the globe, Cathy Freeman was bidding to become the women's world champion runner at 400 meters.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1991 | SUSAN REITER, Susan Reiter is a free-lance writer based in New York.
"For me, the work is almost like an emotional diary," reflects Nina Wiener as she discusses how she approaches making dances. "I finish a piece, look at it and say, 'That's interesting; I hadn't realized I felt that way.' " The tall, lean choreographer, who exudes casual glamour, is sipping tea in her Tribeca loft while the season's first snowfall blunts the city's harsher edges. But her mind is on a very different terrain--that of Australia, which inspired her latest dance.
NEWS
September 25, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Cathy Freeman took to the track early this morning to run the 400-meter finals at Olympic Stadium, she was wearing the prescribed Australian team uniform, green and gold. But her shoes--those were yellow, red and black. Yellow for the sun. Red for the land, the red center of this vast island continent. And black for Australia's indigenous people, the Aborigines.
WORLD
February 17, 2004 | From Associated Press
Rioters in an Aboriginal neighborhood of Sydney set fire to a train station and pelted police with gasoline bombs and bricks, injuring 40 officers in a nine-hour street battle sparked by allegations that police chased a teenager to his death. Hundreds of police doused the rioters using hoses during the fighting, which stretched into Monday morning. The hospitalized officers mostly suffered broken bones, and one was knocked unconscious by a flying brick.
WORLD
March 25, 2004 | Richard C. Paddock, Times Staff Writer
Nearly every weekday, rocks sent from around the world arrive here at the headquarters of the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park. Some are the size of gravel. One weighed in at 75 pounds. But they all have one thing in common: They were taken from a sacred mountain by travelers later weighed down by remorse. Most of these stones are pieces of Uluru, the huge red formation in the middle of the Australian Outback that is widely known as Ayers Rock.
TRAVEL
January 4, 2004 | Fergus Blakiston, Special to The Times
Barramundi Moon, Australia I thought I might die in Dampier Land. It wasn't just the saltwater crocodiles lurking in the mangrove creeks. It wasn't the black tip sharks patrolling the waters of King Sound. I could keep a wary eye on the 30-foot tides, which raced in twice each day, swallowing the rocky beaches along the coastline in minutes. The ferocious mosquitoes, the ants and sand flies were mere annoyances.
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