Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAborigines
IN THE NEWS

Aborigines

NEWS
March 23, 2003 | Tom Cohen, Associated Press Writer
Meeka Mike reaches into a hole in the ice of Frobisher Bay and tugs on the net, pulling out a fat ring seal. Minutes later, the ribs have been cut out to be cooked for dinner, and she munches strips of raw liver. Seal hunting is part of the fabric of Inuit culture in extreme northern Canada, providing food and pelts for clothing as far back as the people known as Eskimos down south can remember.
Advertisement
WORLD
September 26, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
An Australian state has agreed to hand back a slice of desert as large as New York to Aborigines 50 years after they were driven out because the British government wanted to use it to test missiles. Western Australia state expects court approval this week on the deal to return 53,000 square miles to the 2,000-strong Martu people. "They are the traditional owners of the area and have maintained those ties since the colonization of Western Australia in 1829," deputy state premier Eric Ripper said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Clifford Possum, 70, one of the first Australian aboriginal artists to gain an international following, died June 21 in Alice Springs, Australia. The cause of death was not announced by his family. Known as Kumuntjayi Tjapaltjarri to the members of his Ammatyerre tribe, Possum adopted his nontribal name after a Lutheran missionary rescued him from starvation. With no formal education, he become proficient first at woodcarving while working on a cattle ranch for 15 years.
NEWS
May 20, 2002 | LESLEE KOMAIKO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Get your lips loose," said Andrew Werderitsch to the 13 students. "Don't worry about the spit. Get your lips as big and juicy as they can be." No, this isn't a class on advanced smooching. It's a didgeridoo workshop, the first in a planned series open to players of the Australian instrument. This one was held at the Circle, a Marina del Rey area residence that doubles as a creative space.
NEWS
March 2, 2002 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No one would ever accuse him of political correctness. In his long career as Queen Elizabeth II's consort, the duke of Edinburgh has mastered the princely gaffe with ill-considered remarks about Indians, Scots, women and deaf people, among others. The tongue that spares none struck again Friday. During a tour of Australia to mark his wife's Golden Jubilee, Prince Philip added Aborigines to his verbal hit list when he asked a tribal leader, "Do you still throw spears at each other?"
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2001 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Australian aboriginal culture takes us on an unbroken path back to prehistory, a journey that choreographer Stephen Page invokes with an exciting sense of contemporary stagecraft in "Corroboree" for his Sydney-based Bangarra Aboriginal Dance Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
Three people in a Piper Cherokee airplane that crashed Saturday into the waters just off Catalina Island survived without injuries, authorities said. At 4:48 p.m., the Sheriff Department station in Avalon received a call from the Catalina Airport reporting a plane with engine problems, Deputy Douglas Miller said. "The caller [told the airport] they were going to ditch the plane in the water," Miller said.
NEWS
June 1, 2001 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A noisy cement factory sits on the land where Tien Min-jen grew up. He can see its towering bulk from where he lives now, and in its nonstop whir he hears the rumble of injustice. For millenniums, the area has been home to Tien's ancestors, members of the aboriginal Taroko tribe on Taiwan's verdant eastern coast. They raised their crops and their children and put down roots here long before Chinese settlers first arrived 400 years ago.
NEWS
May 13, 2001 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's hard to faze an Angeleno. But if you had been cruising down Olympic Boulevard in Santa Monica on a recent Friday, passing New Roads School, you might have wondered if you had driven into "Survivor II" in the outback. There, on a round patch of grass, with Los Angeles traffic whizzing by in the background, a group of Aboriginal teens stripped off their surfer glasses and jeans, painted their bodies with stripes of blue, and danced with spears to the low, haunting sound of the didgeridoo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2001 | From Associated Press
Johnny Warangkula Tjupurrula, an influential artist whose work helped popularize aboriginal art and later sold for record prices at auction, has died. Tjupurrula died Feb. 12 in poverty in a desert camp in central Australia, the Art Gallery of New South Wales reported Thursday. He was 75. Tjupurrula was one of the most acclaimed of the Papunya Tula school of indigenous artists who pioneered the aboriginal technique of dot painting.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|