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May 12, 1989 | JENIFER WARREN, Times Staff Writer
A brain-dead teen-ager sustained by life-support systems since March because of a thorny legal dispute over the fetus she was carrying delivered the baby by Cesarean section Thursday. Tanya Marie Rivera, 15, and her daughter were in very critical condition after the procedure, officials at San Bernardino County Medical Center said. Meanwhile, Tanya's parents, George and Alice Rivera of San Bernardino, were wrestling late Thursday with whether to remove their daughter from the machines that have kept her alive since she was shot in the head and declared brain dead nearly two months ago. "They've been here all night," said nursing supervisor Joy Flint.
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OPINION
April 22, 2014
Re "The Hoag Hospital compact," Editorial, April 18 There are moments when even nonprofit hospitals break the moral compact they have with the people they serve. Such a moment is playing out for Hoag Hospital as it discontinues legal elective abortion services to seal its partnership with the Roman Catholic St. Joseph Health System. Even state Atty. Gen. Kamala Harris' deal to ensure that Hoag refers women to elective abortion providers doesn't make Hoag's actions smell a whole lot sweeter.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2008 | Patrick McGreevy, Times Staff Writer
Backers of a ballot measure that would require parents to be notified before an abortion is performed on a minor acknowledged Friday that the 15-year-old on which "Sarah's Law" is based had a child and was in a common-law marriage before she died of complications from an abortion in 1994.
NATIONAL
April 18, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Two Texas doctors who had been performing abortions for more than three decades lost their legal ability to do so at the end of March when their new hospital revoked their privileges. This week, a judge temporarily reinstated their positions. But the doctors face an April 30 court hearing to see if that temporary order will remain in place. The abortion case, like many others in Texas at the moment, was sparked by legislation passed last year that placed significant limits on who can perform abortions and where.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1998 | PETER M. WARREN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Ensuring that abortion will again be a major issue in the 46th Congressional District race, two leading GOP opponents of Rep. Loretta Sanchez (D-Garden Grove) are already attacking her for opposing a ban on the controversial partial-birth abortion procedure. Rather than defend her vote against the ban, Sanchez said she will try to steer the debate back to a general discussion of abortion and "the right to choose" by saying she, too, opposes late-term abortions, with certain exceptions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1999
Re "Some in GOP Suggest Softer Stand on Abortion--for Sake of Victory," March 27: What a joyous occasion it would be to read a headline that stated: "Democrats Soften Their Position on 'Abortion on Demand.' " NICHOLAS YANUZZI Thousand Oaks
OPINION
April 22, 2014
Re "The Hoag Hospital compact," Editorial, April 18 There are moments when even nonprofit hospitals break the moral compact they have with the people they serve. Such a moment is playing out for Hoag Hospital as it discontinues legal elective abortion services to seal its partnership with the Roman Catholic St. Joseph Health System. Even state Atty. Gen. Kamala Harris' deal to ensure that Hoag refers women to elective abortion providers doesn't make Hoag's actions smell a whole lot sweeter.
NEWS
November 13, 2013 | By Carla Hall
Who has had an abortion? In an intriguing cover story, New York Magazine decided to answer that question with the names, faces and accounts of 26 women from varied backgrounds who have had the procedure. As New York Magazine points out, about 1.2 million unplanned pregnancies are ended by abortion each year. According to the Guttmacher Institute - a research institute that supports reproductive rights - 3 in 10 American women will have abortions by the time they are 45. Abortion is legal and pervasive and, still, many women are reluctant to talk about their own personal experiences.
OPINION
October 30, 2012
Re "Patt Morrison Asks: Douglas Kmiec, keeping the faith," Opinion, Oct. 24 How is it possible for a Roman Catholic in good conscience, such as Douglas Kmiec says he is, to justify voting for someone who supports abortion rights and embryonic stem-cell research and now wants Catholic institutions to cover contraception at no extra charge as part of their employee healthcare plans? Without the right to life, you have no other rights. The Catholic bishops are right to say that we need to give the highest priority to protecting the unborn and to supporting those candidates who will back such protection.
OPINION
March 23, 2013
Re "N. Dakota's dubious honor," Editorial, March 19 As an obstetrician and gynecologist, I strongly urge North Dakota Gov. Jack Dalrymple to put women and families first and veto the bill banning abortions after a fetus' heartbeat can be detected. I have cared for pregnant women with complex medical conditions. For some of these women, pregnancy termination is the only way to protect their health or save their lives. Roe vs. Wade made it possible to ensure that more women were able to access safe, legal and necessary abortions.
NATIONAL
April 16, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
North Dakota's law banning abortions after 6 weeks of pregnancy is unconstitutional, a federal judge ruled Wednesday, striking down what critics had called the nation's most extreme limit on the procedure. The law, which was approved last year but never took effect, made it a crime for a woman to abort a fetus with a detectable heartbeat. Offending doctors faced up to five years in prison. An exception was allowed for medical emergencies. U.S. District Judge Daniel Hovland said the law was “in direct contradiction” of the Supreme Court's 40-year-old decision in Roe vs. Wade, which established “viability” as the critical point at which states could begin restricting abortions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2014 | By Jill Cowan
The state attorney general's office has found that Newport Beach's Hoag Hospital can continue to refuse to provide elective abortions as long as the hospital helps women access those services elsewhere, according to an agreement announced Friday. The agreement, approved by the state and Hoag last month, closes an investigation sparked by allegations that the hospital had misrepresented the effects of its partnership with a Catholic healthcare provider and was limiting women's access to a full array of reproductive health services.
NATIONAL
April 1, 2014 | By Michael Muskal, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
Restrictions on some types of abortions in Arizona went into effect Tuesday morning after a federal judge upheld state changes limiting a woman's access to an abortion-inducing drug.  U.S. District Judge David Bury issued an order Monday afternoon rejecting a bid to block the new abortion restrictions while the state's 2012 law is litigated. The law allowed the state to issue new rules banning the use of the most common abortion - inducing drug, RU-486, after the seventh week of pregnancy, compared with the current restriction of nine weeks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | Robin Abcarian
You want a recipe for confrontation? Take a bunch of graphic photos of aborted fetuses onto a University of California campus -- or maybe any college campus -- and watch the fireworks. Emotions can run high when liberal college students debate the morality of abortion with religious evangelical opponents. Especially when the parties are standing next to grotesque, bloody photographs of human remains. Bringing those posters onto college campuses is a deliberate act of provocation on the part of youthful anti-abortion ministries such as Survivors of the Abortion Holocaust.
NEWS
March 28, 2014 | By Carla Hall
It wasn't a surprise, but it's still a disappointment that the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals, which sits in New Orleans, upheld the onerous new Texas abortion law and overruled the smart opinion of U.S. District Judge Lee Yeakel, who had seen fit to overturn aspects of it. The law requires doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges at a hospital within 30 miles of where they work. But some doctors who don't have privileges would have to go through a lengthy process to get them, and don't need them to perform abortions.
NATIONAL
March 27, 2014 | By Paresh Dave, This post has been updated. See note below for details.
A new Texas law that's been cited in the closures of more than a dozen abortion clinics in the state does not violate the U.S. Constitution, a federal appeals court ruled Thursday. The U.S. 5th  Circuit Court of Appeals' decision overturns the ruling of U.S. District Judge Lee Yeakel, who last October held the abortion law unconstitutional because it made it too difficult for women to access abortion providers and served no medical purpose. House Bill 2, passed by the GOP-controlled Texas Legislature last year, limits when, how and from whom women can obtain abortions.
NEWS
March 25, 2014 | By Patt Morrison
In the 1960s and '70s, as Americans argued over legalizing abortion, supporters of abortion rights sometimes held coat hangers aloft as an eloquent, grisly reminder that desperate women used them - and other methods --  for horrific, sometimes fatal self-induced illegal abortions. In an April 1969 demonstration by more than 300,000 protesters in Washington, marchers wore coat hangers around their necks and held signs reading, “Never again.” Maybe that symbol has faded from memory after 40 years of legal abortion, but not everyone's forgotten.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2014 | By Robert J. Lopez and Ben Welsh
John Mireles spent six years preparing to become a firefighter. The Signal Hill resident took fire science classes and worked nights on an ambulance crew, in addition to his full-time day job. He said he passed the Los Angeles Fire Department written exam, made it through an interview and background check and reached the final stages of the hiring process. But last week he was among hundreds of candidates who received a terse, two-sentence email from city personnel officials: They would no longer be hiring from a pool of applicants who had advanced through a yearlong screening process.
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