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NEWS
October 21, 1993 | From a Times Staff Writer
In what could be another sign of trouble for President Clinton's plan to include abortion coverage in his health care package, the House on Wednesday defeated the District of Columbia appropriations bill--primarily because the version hammered out by House and Senate negotiators would have allowed federal funds to be used to provide abortions. The 224-206 vote on the conference committee bill indicated that a majority of House members remain opposed to the idea of federally financed abortions.
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NEWS
October 21, 1993 | From a Times Staff Writer
In what could be another sign of trouble for President Clinton's plan to include abortion coverage in his health care package, the House on Wednesday defeated the District of Columbia appropriations bill--primarily because the version hammered out by House and Senate negotiators would have allowed federal funds to be used to provide abortions. The 224-206 vote on the conference committee bill indicated that a majority of House members remain opposed to the idea of federally financed abortions.
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NEWS
August 3, 1991 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Senate bid Friday to lift a Pentagon ban on abortions at U.S military hospitals overseas failed narrowly as the chamber passed a $291-billion defense authorization bill. The failure occurred on a 58-40 vote that would have ended a filibuster and enabled the Senate to vote on a proposal to allow foreign-based military women and dependents to undergo the procedure at their own expense. Proponents fell two short of the 60 votes needed to end the filibuster. The proposal was offered by Sen.
NEWS
July 1, 1993 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first clear test of congressional sentiment on abortion since the election of a President who favors abortion rights, the House voted Wednesday to continue the 17-year-old ban on federal funding for poor women's abortions. While the fate of the ban also depends on action in the Senate, the margin of the House vote, 255 to 178, is an indication that some form of the ban is likely to remain in place.
NEWS
September 11, 1992 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A White House policy that bars family planning clinics from discussing abortion with patients will be tested by 220 clinics in California whose administrators have devised a plan to technically comply while thwarting the intent of the so-called gag rules. The rules, first imposed by the Reagan Administration and continued by President Bush, have survived four years of court challenges, congressional assaults and presidential tinkering.
NEWS
September 13, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Senate approved legislation Thursday revoking a ban on abortion counseling by federally financed clinics and allowing taxpayer-paid abortions for women who are victims of rape or incest. The measure, adopted 78 to 22, faces a veto threat from President Bush over both provisions. With the President promising to reject the bill, abortion foes did little to prevent passage of the legislation.
NEWS
September 11, 1992 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A White House policy that bars family planning clinics from discussing abortion with patients will be tested by 220 clinics in California whose administrators have devised a plan to technically comply with while thwarting the intent of the so-called gag rules. The rules, first imposed by the Reagan Administration and continued by President Bush, have survived four years of court challenges, congressional assaults and presidential tinkering.
NEWS
March 31, 1993 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton will propose ending the 16-year-old ban on federal funding for abortions, the White House announced Tuesday, but a key abortion rights backer in Congress warned that the effort could fail on Capitol Hill. White House spokesman George Stephanopoulos said that Clinton's budget documents, which will be submitted to Congress next month, will not contain the so-called Hyde Amendment, which has prohibited the use of federal funds for abortion since 1977.
NEWS
March 20, 1992 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ten months after the Supreme Court upheld federal regulations forbidding doctors and nurses in U.S.-funded clinics to advise pregnant patients about abortion, the Bush Administration is finally poised to put the controversial rules into effect. Officials of the Department of Health and Human Services in charge of implementing the rules said only that they will be put into effect soon. A White House official said the move could come as early as today.
NEWS
July 1, 1993 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first clear test of congressional sentiment on abortion since the election of a President who favors abortion rights, the House voted Wednesday to continue the 17-year-old ban on federal funding for poor women's abortions. While the fate of the ban also depends on action in the Senate, the margin of the House vote, 255 to 178, is an indication that some form of the ban is likely to remain in place.
NEWS
March 31, 1993 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton will propose ending the 16-year-old ban on federal funding for abortions, the White House announced Tuesday, but a key abortion rights backer in Congress warned that the effort could fail on Capitol Hill. White House spokesman George Stephanopoulos said that Clinton's budget documents, which will be submitted to Congress next month, will not contain the so-called Hyde Amendment, which has prohibited the use of federal funds for abortion since 1977.
NEWS
September 11, 1992 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A White House policy that bars family planning clinics from discussing abortion with patients will be tested by 220 clinics in California whose administrators have devised a plan to technically comply while thwarting the intent of the so-called gag rules. The rules, first imposed by the Reagan Administration and continued by President Bush, have survived four years of court challenges, congressional assaults and presidential tinkering.
NEWS
September 11, 1992 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A White House policy that bars family planning clinics from discussing abortion with patients will be tested by 220 clinics in California whose administrators have devised a plan to technically comply with while thwarting the intent of the so-called gag rules. The rules, first imposed by the Reagan Administration and continued by President Bush, have survived four years of court challenges, congressional assaults and presidential tinkering.
NEWS
May 1, 1992 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House voted Thursday to overturn the so-called "gag rule" that forbids counselors in federally subsidized family planning clinics from referring pregnant patients to abortion doctors. But the vote margin, 268 to 150, was well short of the two-thirds majority needed to overcome an expected veto by President Bush. The long, emotional debate Thursday marked the third time in a year that House members have tangled over the abortion counseling issue. Each time, the result has been about the same.
NEWS
March 20, 1992 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ten months after the Supreme Court upheld federal regulations forbidding doctors and nurses in U.S.-funded clinics to advise pregnant patients about abortion, the Bush Administration is finally poised to put the controversial rules into effect. Officials of the Department of Health and Human Services in charge of implementing the rules said only that they will be put into effect soon. A White House official said the move could come as early as today.
NEWS
September 13, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Senate approved legislation Thursday revoking a ban on abortion counseling by federally financed clinics and allowing taxpayer-paid abortions for women who are victims of rape or incest. The measure, adopted 78 to 22, faces a veto threat from President Bush over both provisions. With the President promising to reject the bill, abortion foes did little to prevent passage of the legislation.
NEWS
June 9, 1991 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the two weeks since the U.S. Supreme Court upheld regulations barring abortion counseling in federally funded family planning clinics, health officials in California have been exhaustively exploring how they might survive the ruling, which they say could cut off family planning services for a quarter of the state's women who need them.
NEWS
August 3, 1991 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Senate bid Friday to lift a Pentagon ban on abortions at U.S military hospitals overseas failed narrowly as the chamber passed a $291-billion defense authorization bill. The failure occurred on a 58-40 vote that would have ended a filibuster and enabled the Senate to vote on a proposal to allow foreign-based military women and dependents to undergo the procedure at their own expense. Proponents fell two short of the 60 votes needed to end the filibuster. The proposal was offered by Sen.
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