Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAbortion Laws
IN THE NEWS

Abortion Laws

NATIONAL
October 28, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
A federal judge is expected to rule Monday on the constitutionality of a controversial Texas abortion law set to take effect Tuesday. Last week, U.S. District Judge Lee Yeakel heard three days of testimony and oral arguments in Austin about the law, which opponents sued to block after its passage this past summer . The law would limit medication-induced abortions and require doctors to have admitting privileges at hospitals to perform abortions,...
Advertisement
NATIONAL
October 28, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
Some controversial new Texas abortion restrictions are unconstitutional and will not take effect as scheduled on Tuesday, a federal judge ruled Monday. “Today's ruling marks an important victory for Texas women and sends a clear message to lawmakers: It is unconstitutional for politicians to pass laws that take personal, private decisions away from women and their doctors," said Cecile Richards, president of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America. After Texas lawmakers approved the new restrictions this summer , Planned Parenthood and other abortion providers challenged them in court , arguing that they unfairly limited medication-induced abortion and forced doctors to have admitting privileges at a hospital near the abortion clinic where they work, in effect closing a third of clinics statewide.
NATIONAL
October 28, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
Some controversial new Texas abortion restrictions are unconstitutional and will not take effect as scheduled Tuesday, a federal judge ruled Monday. "Today's ruling marks an important victory for Texas women and sends a clear message to lawmakers: It is unconstitutional for politicians to pass laws that take personal, private decisions away from women and their doctors," said Cecile Richards, president of Planned Parenthood Federation of America. After Texas lawmakers approved the new restrictions last summer, Planned Parenthood and other abortion providers challenged them in court, arguing that they unfairly limited medication-induced abortions and forced doctors to have admitting privileges at hospitals near the abortion clinics where they worked, effectively closing a third of clinics statewide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2013 | Robin Abcarian
At a time when so many states are chipping away at reproductive rights, making it nearly impossible for women to exercise their constitutional right to terminate a pregnancy, how refreshing to see California standing up for women's rights. On Wednesday, Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill into law that gives some medical professionals who are not doctors the right to perform early abortions. The bill, introduced by Democratic Assemblywoman Toni Atkins of San Diego, followed a years-long pilot program involving more than 11,000 women who underwent first-trimester abortions.
NATIONAL
August 3, 2013 | By Benjamin Mueller
A federal judge has extended a preliminary injunction blocking part of a new Wisconsin law that requires abortion providers to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals. The order, issued Friday by U.S. District Judge William Conley, stems from a lawsuit that Planned Parenthood and Affiliated Medical Services filed last month. The groups claim the law would shut two of the state's four abortion clinics because providers at those facilities, in Appleton and Milwaukee, lack admitting privileges.
NATIONAL
July 22, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
A federal judge has temporarily blocked the North Dakota law that bans abortions when a fetal heartbeat is detected, the nation's most stringent limit on a women's ability to terminate her pregnancy. Under the law, which had been scheduled to go into effect Aug. 1, a woman could be prevented from seeking an abortion as early as six weeks into her pregnancy if a fetal heartbeat is detected. North Dakota passed the law at the end of March, part of a package of curbs in four laws that passed the Republican-controlled Legislature and were signed by GOP Gov. Jack Dalrymple.
NEWS
July 19, 2013 | By Robert Greene
How many laws has California passed, how many verdicts have its juries reached, how many social movements has it launched that other people in other states consider unjust or vile and would like to punish with a boycott? That's one of the questions members of The Times' editorial board asked one another in May 2010 when we were considering whether to weigh in for or against a boycott of Arizona to send a message of protest against SB 1070, our neighboring state's strict anti-illegal immigration law. And it's a question that comes up again now, shortly before the Legislature is to take up Assemblyman Chris Holden's proposed joint resolution calling for a boycott of Florida over the acquittal of George Zimmerman and -- or -- that state's “stand your ground” law. Boycotts are a tricky business.
NATIONAL
July 8, 2013 | By Mark Z. Barabak
Texas Gov. Rick Perry announced Monday he would not seek reelection in 2014, a move that will end his reign as the longest-serving chief executive in state history and one of the most powerful. He did not rule out another run for president. Speaking to a hand-picked audience of supporters in San Antonio and quoting from the book of Ecclesiastes, Perry said there was a time for everything and, for him, "The time has come to pass on the mantle of leadership. " In a voice that sometimes quavered with emotion as he recounted his decade-plus in office, Perry said he would "work and pray" to determine his path forward.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
Abortion rights supporters may as well put away those champagne glasses. Jubilation probably came a bit prematurely for those celebrating the demise of the Texas measure that would turn back the clock on reproductive rights. While many thought that Texas state Sen. Wendy Davis' bold filibuster killed the bill outlawing abortions after 20 weeks' gestation, it merely served to postpone what many think is inevitable: the passage of yet another state measure restricting abortion and creating an insurmountable regulatory obstacle for all but five of the state's 42 abortion clinics, by requiring them to offer the same level of care as ambulatory surgery centers.
NEWS
June 27, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court told the high court of Oklahoma on Thursday to clarify a new state law restricting the use of the RU-486 abortion pill, setting the stage for a possible future ruling on how far states can go in regulating the practice of abortion. Legislators in several states, including Oklahoma, have passed laws to strictly regulate the practice of abortion. Among them are measures that require all women seeking abortions to undergo an ultrasound test. Oklahoma also adopted a law restricting the use of RU-486.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|