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NEWS
January 24, 1995 | SUSAN DRUMMET
In every abortion, of course, there is a baby that, for whatever reason, will go unborn. The word (from the Latin aboriri : to miscarry) covers both the furtive operation carried out in a dirty cellar in the heart of teeming Cairo and what a poor, illiterate Latin American peasant woman pathetically prays will happen when she quaffs a dose of herbal tea. Here are Times reports from several nations: Mexico In predominantly Roman Catholic Mexico, abortion is against the law.
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WORLD
May 29, 2007 | Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writer
About 700 women have requested abortions at public hospitals here in the month since legislators legalized abortion in this capital city, and hundreds more have received abortions at private clinics, according to government officials and abortion rights groups. Women's groups have praised city officials for moving quickly to put the law into effect after its April 24 approval by the Mexico City legislature. Abortion remains illegal in the rest of Mexico.
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NEWS
March 28, 1989 | From Associated Press
An estimated 700,000 clandestine abortions are performed every year, and complications arising from them are the fifth cause of death among women in Mexico, a study by the government Social Security Medical Institute said Monday.
WORLD
April 25, 2007 | Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writer
City lawmakers voted Tuesday to legalize abortion in this capital during the first 12 weeks of pregnancy, an action supporters say will serve as a landmark for women's rights in Latin America. The legislation could result in thousands of Mexican women traveling to the capital for legal abortions. Roman Catholic activists and the leaders of the conservative National Action Party, or PAN, have promised to challenge the law in court.
WORLD
April 25, 2007 | Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writer
City lawmakers voted Tuesday to legalize abortion in this capital during the first 12 weeks of pregnancy, an action supporters say will serve as a landmark for women's rights in Latin America. The legislation could result in thousands of Mexican women traveling to the capital for legal abortions. Roman Catholic activists and the leaders of the conservative National Action Party, or PAN, have promised to challenge the law in court.
WORLD
May 29, 2007 | Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writer
About 700 women have requested abortions at public hospitals here in the month since legislators legalized abortion in this capital city, and hundreds more have received abortions at private clinics, according to government officials and abortion rights groups. Women's groups have praised city officials for moving quickly to put the law into effect after its April 24 approval by the Mexico City legislature. Abortion remains illegal in the rest of Mexico.
WORLD
June 14, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The leftist party that has legalized gay unions and abortion in Mexico City said it wants to make prostitution legal in the capital. Mexico City legislator Juan Bustos of the Democratic Revolution Party, or PRD, who submitted the bill, said the move is necessary to protect prostitutes from abuse and regulate the sex industry. He expects opposition.
WORLD
May 11, 2007 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
The pope, it turns out, has an editor. Fallout from comments Benedict XVI made Wednesday about abortion and excommunication has been so intense that the Vatican has simply changed the record. It all began when the pope, in a news conference aboard his flight to Brazil, appeared to endorse the excommunication of Roman Catholic politicians who vote to legalize abortion.
OPINION
April 26, 2007
LAST YEAR, Human Rights Watch documented the case of a 16-year-old girl from the Mexican state of Guanajuato who was repeatedly raped by her father over the course of a year. She became pregnant and begged authorities to allow her to get an abortion; even Mexico's deeply restrictive reproductive laws allow abortions in cases of rape.
WORLD
June 11, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- She rose to the podium and cast her eyes skyward. The mayor of Monterrey then entrusted her Mexican city to God and Jesus Christ as the crowd around her cheered. “I open the doors of this city to God as the maximum authority,” Mayor Margarita Arellanes said. “I recognize that without his presence and his help, we cannot have real success.” Whether a sign of desperation for how dire things are in northern Mexico, which is plagued by drug violence, or simply a profession of faith, Arellanes' weekend speech has rankled many in this country where the separation of church and state is a founding principle -- one that helped spark a violent uprising a century ago. One columnist called her the new Mexican Sarah Palin -- alluding, he explained, to a relatively inexperienced politician who isn't shy about wearing her religion on her sleeve, like the former U.S. vice presidential candidate.
NEWS
January 24, 1995 | SUSAN DRUMMET
In every abortion, of course, there is a baby that, for whatever reason, will go unborn. The word (from the Latin aboriri : to miscarry) covers both the furtive operation carried out in a dirty cellar in the heart of teeming Cairo and what a poor, illiterate Latin American peasant woman pathetically prays will happen when she quaffs a dose of herbal tea. Here are Times reports from several nations: Mexico In predominantly Roman Catholic Mexico, abortion is against the law.
NEWS
March 28, 1989 | From Associated Press
An estimated 700,000 clandestine abortions are performed every year, and complications arising from them are the fifth cause of death among women in Mexico, a study by the government Social Security Medical Institute said Monday.
NEWS
April 9, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Weak from anesthesia, Teresa Juarez left the clandestine abortion clinic two hours after she had arrived. The fear that possessed her going into the illegal operation gave way to relief afterward. "We couldn't afford another child, and I wasn't going to bring my baby into the world to suffer," recalled Juarez, 27. "I was done with the problem." In fact, her problems were just beginning. On the way back to Mexico City from an industrial suburb, an unmarked car intercepted the white van carrying Juarez and four other women who had just undergone abortions.
NEWS
February 28, 1986 | MARYLOUISE OATES, Times Staff Writer
This book is not, repeat not , the story of Ronald and Nancy Reagan and their daughter, Patti Davis. Readers of "Home Front" this spring might spend days figuring out where fiction ends and fact begins, but this tale of a rebellious daughter of a politician and his traditional wife, the author insists, is merely a novel.
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