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NATIONAL
October 28, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
A federal judge is expected to rule Monday on the constitutionality of a controversial Texas abortion law set to take effect Tuesday. Last week, U.S. District Judge Lee Yeakel heard three days of testimony and oral arguments in Austin about the law, which opponents sued to block after its passage this past summer . The law would limit medication-induced abortions and require doctors to have admitting privileges at hospitals to perform abortions,...
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NATIONAL
October 28, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
Some controversial new Texas abortion restrictions are unconstitutional and will not take effect as scheduled Tuesday, a federal judge ruled Monday. "Today's ruling marks an important victory for Texas women and sends a clear message to lawmakers: It is unconstitutional for politicians to pass laws that take personal, private decisions away from women and their doctors," said Cecile Richards, president of Planned Parenthood Federation of America. After Texas lawmakers approved the new restrictions last summer, Planned Parenthood and other abortion providers challenged them in court, arguing that they unfairly limited medication-induced abortions and forced doctors to have admitting privileges at hospitals near the abortion clinics where they worked, effectively closing a third of clinics statewide.
NATIONAL
October 28, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
Some controversial new Texas abortion restrictions are unconstitutional and will not take effect as scheduled on Tuesday, a federal judge ruled Monday. “Today's ruling marks an important victory for Texas women and sends a clear message to lawmakers: It is unconstitutional for politicians to pass laws that take personal, private decisions away from women and their doctors," said Cecile Richards, president of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America. After Texas lawmakers approved the new restrictions this summer , Planned Parenthood and other abortion providers challenged them in court , arguing that they unfairly limited medication-induced abortion and forced doctors to have admitting privileges at a hospital near the abortion clinic where they work, in effect closing a third of clinics statewide.
OPINION
October 12, 2013
Re "Law aims to boost access to abortions," Oct. 10 If there is such a big demand for abortions in California, then maybe training non-doctors such as nurse practitioners to perform first-trimester procedures might not be the adequate response. Perhaps instead we should be training people to show others how to use condoms and be responsible. I am a progressive who believes that abortion should be safe, rare and legal. But I utterly reject the notion that abortion should be viewed as a method of family planning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
Santa Clara University, a Catholic institution in the Silicon Valley area, is dropping coverage for elective abortions under health insurance for its faculty and staff members, officials said. The move is part of what seems to be a trend among Catholic campuses seeking to uphold their religious beliefs against abortion while employing and enrolling many non-Catholics. Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles took a similar step this week but, in a compromise, is allowing employees to buy coverage for elective abortions through an insurance plan not administered or subsidized by the school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2013 | Robin Abcarian
At a time when so many states are chipping away at reproductive rights, making it nearly impossible for women to exercise their constitutional right to terminate a pregnancy, how refreshing to see California standing up for women's rights. On Wednesday, Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill into law that gives some medical professionals who are not doctors the right to perform early abortions. The bill, introduced by Democratic Assemblywoman Toni Atkins of San Diego, followed a years-long pilot program involving more than 11,000 women who underwent first-trimester abortions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- California women will have more access to abortion after Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill Wednesday that allows nurse practitioners and other non-physicians to perform the procedure during the first trimester of pregnancy. Assemblywoman Toni Atkins (D-San Diego) introduced the measure because of concern that there are not enough physicians, especially in rural areas, to meet the needs of women who desire an abortion. “Timely access to reproductive health services is critical to women's health,” Atkins said in a statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy and Anthony York
SACRAMENTO - Giving California women more access to abortion, Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill Wednesday that allows nurse practitioners and certain other non-physicians to perform the procedure during the first trimester of pregnancy. The governor acted on 32 bills in all, approving measures that will cap drug costs for cancer patients, expand the number of people on CalFresh, the state's food stamp program, and promote breastfeeding. Assemblywoman Toni Atkins (D-San Diego) introduced the abortion measure because of concern that not enough physicians perform abortions, especially in rural areas, to meet the needs of women seeking to terminate a pregnancy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
Amid a debate about the role of Catholic colleges in a secular society, Loyola Marymount University this week decided to drop staff health insurance coverage for "elective" abortions and instead offer employees a separate, unsubsidized plan to cover those procedures. The move was seen on campus as a compromise between traditionalist alumni and faculty - who think the university should have nothing to do with abortion - and a more liberal group who contend LMU should not impose religious doctrine on the large number of non-Catholics it enrolls and employs.
NATIONAL
October 6, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court term that opens Monday gives the court's conservative bloc a clear opportunity to shift the law to the right on touchstone social issues such as abortion, contraception and religion, as well as the political controversy over campaign funding. If the justices on the right agree among themselves, they could free wealthy donors to give far more to candidates and parties and clear the way for exclusively Christian prayers at local government events. In other cases due to be heard this fall, the justices are likely to uphold state bans on college affirmative action and block most housing bias claims that allege an unfair impact on blacks and Latinos.
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