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Abstract Art

ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2007 | Randy Lewis
THE artistry of '60s rock icons Jimi Hendrix and Janis Joplin wasn't limited to their Rock and Roll Hall of Fame music. As it happens, both were deeply interested in visual art before their music careers took off, and several of their drawings and paintings will be on display in Hollywood in conjunction with this year's Mods & Rockers Film Festival put on by American Cinematheque.
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BUSINESS
October 19, 1992 | ANNE MICHAUD
Artist Nancy Bowen's courses are designed to help participants tap into the problem-solving part of themselves. Most people have, on occasion, had a flash of insight that solved a problem, whether personal or in business. But most can't say what caused the insight, and they certainly wouldn't know how to repeat it. Nancy Bowen, an artist and teacher, believes that she has found a way to help people tap into that problem-solving part of themselves.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1986 | JOSINE IANCO-STARRELS
"Eight Million Stories in the Naked City," an exhibition of narrative works, christens the new year at Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions, Jan. 9 to Feb. 8. The exhibition focuses on photography by Lisa Bloomfield, Douglas Huebler and Barbara Kruger, drawings by Anetta Kapon and an installation by Linda Nishio. Curator Elaine Wintman selected the artists. Meanwhile, LACE's show of experimental video works, titled "Video and Language: Video as Language," continues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2008 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
William Brice, an artist best known for grand-scale abstract paintings that suggest fragments of ancient classical ruins, has died. He was 86. Brice, who also was an influential art teacher at UCLA for decades, died Monday at UCLA Medical Center, according to Kimberly Davis, director of L.A. Louver Gallery, which represents him. Davis said the exact cause of death was not known but that Brice had recently taken a fall, hit his head and never regained...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1993 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
It's a rare thing in the Southland to see a survey of native abstract art that is as hip, scholarly, comprehensive and concise as the one just opened at the Newport Harbor Art Museum. Rather stuffily titled "American Abstraction From the Addison Gallery of American Art," it still manages to function as a brilliantly clear short lecture on the essence of the form delivered by the world's best teachers, the works themselves.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1986 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
"Abstract art remains misunderstood by the majority of the viewing public. Most people, in fact, consider it meaningless," Maurice Tuchman writes in the exhibition catalogue of "The Spiritual in Art: Abstract Painting, 1890-1985." If the show that Tuchman has organized to inaugurate the County Museum of Art's Robert O. Anderson Building has its desired effect, abstract art will gain a more discerning audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1995 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jim Isermann's quietly dazzling weavings at Richard Telles Fine Art rank among the best works this multitalented artist has made over his impressively diverse career. Beautifully crafted and intelligently conceived, these handmade works are as humble as dishrags, yet they do the job of the most high-minded abstract art. Isermann's approximately four-foot-square plaids, stripes and zig-zags hang casually against the wall, like relaxed, off-duty paintings.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1998 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ed Mieczkowski, 68, is part of the second generation of American abstract artists--the ones whose paths were smoothed by decades-earlier battles against the ignorance and scorn of a public firmly wedded to representational art. Yet the compact, genial man from Cleveland who was strolling through the Laguna Art Museum in a playfully hand-painted hat the other day began reminiscing about his own struggles while ostensibly discussing an exhibition of 60 works by artists active in the '30s and '40s.
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