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Abstract Art

ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1993 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
It's a rare thing in the Southland to see a survey of native abstract art that is as hip, scholarly, comprehensive and concise as the one just opened at the Newport Harbor Art Museum. Rather stuffily titled "American Abstraction From the Addison Gallery of American Art," it still manages to function as a brilliantly clear short lecture on the essence of the form delivered by the world's best teachers, the works themselves.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1986 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
"Abstract art remains misunderstood by the majority of the viewing public. Most people, in fact, consider it meaningless," Maurice Tuchman writes in the exhibition catalogue of "The Spiritual in Art: Abstract Painting, 1890-1985." If the show that Tuchman has organized to inaugurate the County Museum of Art's Robert O. Anderson Building has its desired effect, abstract art will gain a more discerning audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1995 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jim Isermann's quietly dazzling weavings at Richard Telles Fine Art rank among the best works this multitalented artist has made over his impressively diverse career. Beautifully crafted and intelligently conceived, these handmade works are as humble as dishrags, yet they do the job of the most high-minded abstract art. Isermann's approximately four-foot-square plaids, stripes and zig-zags hang casually against the wall, like relaxed, off-duty paintings.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1998 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ed Mieczkowski, 68, is part of the second generation of American abstract artists--the ones whose paths were smoothed by decades-earlier battles against the ignorance and scorn of a public firmly wedded to representational art. Yet the compact, genial man from Cleveland who was strolling through the Laguna Art Museum in a playfully hand-painted hat the other day began reminiscing about his own struggles while ostensibly discussing an exhibition of 60 works by artists active in the '30s and '40s.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2012 | By David Ng
Frank Gehry was in his hometown of Toronto on Monday to reveal his conceptual designs for a multiyear transformation of the city's downtown arts and entertainment district. The architect is teaming with Canadian theater producer David Mirvish, whose sizable art collection will receive a new home as part of the massive endeavor. The mixed-used project will include three high-rise residential towers soaring from 80 to 85 stories and a new facility for the Ontario College of Art & Design University.
NEWS
July 4, 1991 | ZAN THOMPSON
Maybe if I enrolled in one of the fourth- or fifth-grade classes in the Desert Sands Unified School District, I would be able to enjoy abstract art and give up one of my red-barn-in-the-rain pictures. As a principal in the school in the Palm Springs district said to Betty Rinnig, "I've learned more about abstract art in 15 minutes than I have in 45 years." Betty Rinnig is a docent in the Palm Springs Desert Museum's art appreciation course called "Making Friends With Art."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1988 | WILLIAM WILSON, Times Art Critic
Radical Russian art suppressed in the Stalinist era and kept hidden from the Soviet public for more than half a century will once again be shown to the Russian people. This fall the State Russian Museum at Leningrad will unveil an encyclopedic exhibition of some 500 works of avant-garde art of the '20s and '30s made by nearly 160 artists including such legendary figures as Wassily Kandinsky, Kasimir Malevich, Aleksandr Rodchenko, Vladimir Tatlin and El Lissitzky.
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