Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAbstract Expressionism
IN THE NEWS

Abstract Expressionism

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1996 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Like most people, I've long regarded the Abstract Expressionist painting done in San Francisco in the decade after World War II to have been a quick, sometimes deft response to extraordinary artistic developments principally being generated in New York.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Probably the most significant Sam Francis painting in an American collection is "Basel Mural I," which hangs in Pasadena's Norton Simon Museum. Part of an epic 1956 commission from a Swiss museum director, the canvas assembles patchy clouds of veiled, liquid color - watery blue, bright yellow and deep orange - that seem to grow and multiply like organic cells within a luminous white field. When it was finally installed two years later in the grand stairwell of the Basel Kunsthalle with its pair of companion paintings, the trio cemented Francis' reputation as a major artist.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 20, 1997 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Willem de Kooning, the Abstract Expressionist considered by many the world's greatest living artist, died Wednesday at 92. He died in his studio on New York's Long Island, where he had continued to paint until recent years despite having Alzheimer's disease. Although De Kooning suffered, his painting remarkably did not. He seldom recognized old friends, but many critics and connoisseurs of art believed he did some of the best work of his long life as his memory and mind apparently were failing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2012 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Viredo Espinosa, a member of a revolutionary group of artists in 1950s Cuba whose Abstract Expressionism expanded the scope of the country's modern art, died Sunday in Costa Mesa. He was 83. Espinosa, who fled Cuba in 1969 and eventually settled in Southern California, died of natural causes at a nursing facility, said his friend Mariano Sanchez. The Cuban artists were called the Group of the Eleven and introduced non-figurative, abstract works into modern art in their home country, said Raul Fernandez, who is chairman of UC Irvine's department of Chicano Latino Studies and curated a traveling Smithsonian exhibition on Latin jazz art that featured several Espinosa works.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1985 | United Press International
Lundy Siegriest, the son of a famed painter who grew up to be a noted modern artist, has died of cancer at age 60. A memorial gathering will be held in Oakland on Monday. Siegriest, who died Wednesday, was the son of Louis Siegriest, who survives him at 86 and was one of the Oakland-based "Society of Six" post-Impressionists who pioneered modern art in Northern California in the 1920s. Until 1968, the younger Siegriest painted in the style of what one critic called "bold abstract Expressionism."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1985 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
Just when we thought it was safe to close the volume on Abstract Expressionism for awhile, here comes a major exhibition of late '40s and '50s sculpture to announce that the facts are not all in yet. The show is "The Third Dimension: Sculpture of the New York School," at the Whitney Museum of American Art through March 3, and it delivers revelations of a glaring kind.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1985 | From the Associated Press
Artist Robert Motherwell was given an honorary degree by Brown University recently to mark his 40-year career as a painter and his part in founding the art style known as Abstract Expressionism.
NEWS
April 28, 1990
Raymond Parker, 67, an abstract painter whose works were known for their understated sensuality. Critics placed him in a generation of artists who reacted against Abstract Expressionism. He strove for abstractions that were ambitious yet relaxed. His art was exhibited at the Guggenheim Museum in 1961, at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art in 1967 and at the Phillips Collection in Washington in 1979.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2011 | By Suzanne Muchnic, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Lee Krasner A Biography Gail Levin William Morrow: 532 pp., $30 "I happen to be Mrs. Jackson Pollock, and that's a mouthful. The only thing I haven't had against me was being black. I was a woman, Jewish, a widow, a damn good painter, thank you, and a little too independent. " That's Lee Krasner in 1973, talking to Newsday journalist Amei Wallach about a landmark event in her career. At 65, Krasner was having her first solo exhibition at a New York museum, a show of 18 large abstract paintings at the Whitney Museum of American Art. Prickly and proud, Krasner was perpetually in the shadow of her husband, a leading Abstract Expressionist painter and self-destructive alcoholic who left her a widow at 47. Thanks in large part to female advocates, she finally gained recognition as a Modernist master who came of age in Abstract Expressionism's formative stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1985 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
A show of John Franklin Koenig's collages and paintings introduces an artist who has moved to Seattle after a lengthy stint in Europe. He's a deft designer who keeps us briefly entertained with a changing repertoire of materials, textures and other surface effects but fails to enlist prolonged interest. Koenig has been influenced by Oriental art and Abstract Expressionism and his current artwork perpetuates those interests.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2011 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
The Getty Foundation announced three years ago that its research project to archive material related to Los Angeles art made between the end of World War II and 1980, before it was lost to indifference or time's vagaries, would be expanded to support a series of exhibitions. It seemed a worthy goal. The story of L.A. art's meteoric rise and temporary stumble, before it helped lead the global art explosion of the 1980s, had only been sketchily told. Grants totaling $2.8 million would be made to 15 Southern California institutions to help underwrite shows, targeted to open in 2011.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2011 | By Suzanne Muchnic, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Lee Krasner A Biography Gail Levin William Morrow: 532 pp., $30 "I happen to be Mrs. Jackson Pollock, and that's a mouthful. The only thing I haven't had against me was being black. I was a woman, Jewish, a widow, a damn good painter, thank you, and a little too independent. " That's Lee Krasner in 1973, talking to Newsday journalist Amei Wallach about a landmark event in her career. At 65, Krasner was having her first solo exhibition at a New York museum, a show of 18 large abstract paintings at the Whitney Museum of American Art. Prickly and proud, Krasner was perpetually in the shadow of her husband, a leading Abstract Expressionist painter and self-destructive alcoholic who left her a widow at 47. Thanks in large part to female advocates, she finally gained recognition as a Modernist master who came of age in Abstract Expressionism's formative stage.
NEWS
March 9, 2011 | By Susan James, Special to The Times
The Tate Modern Art Museum in London, which opened in 2000 in a onetime power station, will open a major exhibition of the work of Spanish artist Joan MirÃ?³, called the father of Abstract Expressionism, on April 14. The show, featuring more than 150 works, is one of the most extensive shows ever dedicated to this  20th century artist and the first in London in half a century. The exhibition, "The Ladder of Escape,"  features rarely seen pieces that signpost the stages of MirÃ?
MAGAZINE
March 7, 2004 | Susan Heeger
The last place you'd expect to find two creative souls such as Erik and Irina Gronborg is in a tract house near San Diego. But tucked between homes with rose beds and buzzed lawns, their house stands out from the crowd. Giant agaves and echiums have replaced the grass, and bougainvillea climbs the walls amid carved gates. Nearby, exotic potted greens swing from the eaves. "We love the tropics, the look of a small, simple building dwarfed by plants, half-buried in the jungle," Irina says.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2001 | BLAKE GOPNIK, WASHINGTON POST
Abstract art is like Tabasco sauce. This is not just a metaphor; it is a close analogy. Hot peppers, I am told, provide a sensory experience that changes the sense organ that perceives it. Eat them right from childhood, and they provide a different taste experience to you than to someone who's new to them. It's not, I gather, simply that you've become more used to how they burn your tongue and so take pleasure in the sensation.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2001 | VIVIAN LETRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the beginning, every career move Tom Field made seemed right. The young painter, born and raised in Fort Wayne, Ind., mingled with some of the world's premiere 20th century artists, including Robert Rauschenberg, Willem de Kooning, Josef Albers, Franz Kline and Joseph Fiore--all of whom he knew in the 1950s at Black Mountain College in North Carolina. At 26, he emerged in a vibrant San Francisco art scene as a noteworthy Abstract Expressionist. Then the worst thing happened: nothing.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1986 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Art Writer
"The Interpretive Link: Abstract Surrealism Into Abstract Expressionism," opening today at the Newport Harbor Art Museum, aims to explode the Big Bang theory of American art's rise to glory. The exhibition of 137 works on paper (from 1938 to 1948) insists that Abstract Expressionism did not burst out of New York studios like a grubby orphan possessed with genius.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2012 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Viredo Espinosa, a member of a revolutionary group of artists in 1950s Cuba whose Abstract Expressionism expanded the scope of the country's modern art, died Sunday in Costa Mesa. He was 83. Espinosa, who fled Cuba in 1969 and eventually settled in Southern California, died of natural causes at a nursing facility, said his friend Mariano Sanchez. The Cuban artists were called the Group of the Eleven and introduced non-figurative, abstract works into modern art in their home country, said Raul Fernandez, who is chairman of UC Irvine's department of Chicano Latino Studies and curated a traveling Smithsonian exhibition on Latin jazz art that featured several Espinosa works.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1997 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Los Angeles artist Helena Jin Ah Min is seen in an unpretentious exhibition of 16 small, untitled abstract paintings at Pasadena's Pacific Asia Museum. Titled "Tangible Space," it continues a now long-established fusion of traditional Asian art and Western Abstract Expressionism. This is decidedly not art out to surf the trends. Most of the compositions are achieved through painting collaged scraps of fabric or paper.
NEWS
September 30, 1997 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Roy Lichtenstein, the artist whose classic paintings of comic strips were a defining factor in the Pop Art movement that exploded in the 1960s, died Monday at New York University Medical Center, where he had been hospitalized for several weeks. He was 73. The cause of death was pneumonia, according to Aryn Lieberman, spokeswoman for Leo Castelli Gallery, which has represented Lichtenstein since 1962.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|