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Abu Ghraib Prison

NATIONAL
February 5, 2005 | From Associated Press
Sgt. Javal S. Davis, who admitted abusing detainees at Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq in late 2003, was sentenced Friday to six months in a military prison and given a bad-conduct discharge from the Army. A nine-man military jury deliberated for about 5 1/2 hours to determine the punishment for Davis, a former Abu Ghraib guard who confessed this week to stepping on the hands and feet of a group of handcuffed detainees and falling with his full weight on top of them.
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OPINION
May 17, 2004
One would hope that the civilized world would be far removed from the Wild West. The recent pictures taken at the Abu Ghraib prison tell a different story -- a godless and disheartening tale. The entrusted leaders of our nation have once more failed in their pursuit of "democracy," a term often used but hardly practiced. Violence begets violence, and we are paying the price. Should we wait any longer in Iraq for welcoming roses? Zorik Mooradian Glendale Several U.S. officials are urging the Bush administration to dismantle the Abu Ghraib prison west of Baghdad.
NATIONAL
May 4, 2005 | From Associated Press
Defense lawyers sought leniency for Pfc. Lynndie R. England at a hearing Tuesday to determine her punishment in the Abu Ghraib prison abuse scandal, with a psychologist testifying that the reservist was oxygen-deprived at birth, speech-impaired and had trouble learning to read. West Virginia school psychologist Thomas Denne -- the first defense witness -- said England's learning disabilities were identified when she was in kindergarten.
WORLD
May 22, 2004 | From Times Wire Services
The U.S. military on Friday released 454 Iraqis from the Abu Ghraib prison, the center of a scandal involving American mistreatment of detainees. A convoy of at least six buses, accompanied by U.S. troops in armored vehicles and jeeps, took the prisoners from the facility on Baghdad's western outskirts to Tikrit and Baqubah, north of the capital. Some also were returned to Ramadi and Baghdad. Early today, the military announced that a roadside bomb had killed one U.S.
OPINION
May 8, 2004
Re "Contractors Fall Through Legal Cracks," May 4: So, the Pentagon is supposedly searching for a means to prosecute civilians in the abuse of Iraqis? Hogwash! The Pentagon has the authority and the means -- just not the integrity and moral courage to prosecute them. If Pentagon officials have the authority to arrest Iraqi civilians for alleged crimes (and the Abu Ghraib prison is full of such Iraqis), then they have the authority to arrest any civilian in Iraq who commits a crime. Seems to me that what the Pentagon is really searching for is a means to prosecute its civilian contractors without revealing its own direct complicity in the crimes.
NATIONAL
May 18, 2005 | From Associated Press
An Army reservist who appeared in several of the most infamous abuse photos taken by guards at Abu Ghraib prison was sentenced Tuesday to six months in prison for her role in the scandal that stained the U.S. military's image at home and abroad. The sentence for Spc. Sabrina Harman came a day after she was convicted on six of the seven counts she faced for mistreating detainees at the lockup near Baghdad in late 2003.
WORLD
September 25, 2009 | Ned Parker and Saif Hameed
In a daring escape, 16 prisoners, five of them awaiting execution, apparently crawled through a window of an Iraqi jail before fanning out in different directions, police and local officials said Thursday. The escape in the northern town of Tikrit, which raised concerns about corruption within security forces, resulted in a curfew in the birthplace of the late dictator Saddam Hussein, as authorities hunted for the men. At least two of the fugitives were later captured, one at a checkpoint in Tikrit and another elsewhere in Salahuddin province, outside Samarra, the provincial capital, police said.
NATIONAL
May 25, 2005 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Testifying behind a curtain to protect his identity, a CIA operative told a court-martial Tuesday that he saw a Navy SEAL "pummeling" a defenseless prisoner in Iraq. The operative said he saw the SEAL on the back of a prisoner, hitting him. He reported the October 2003 incident to the CIA's senior officer on the scene, who warned a Navy commander that such conduct was unacceptable, the operative said. Tuesday was the second day of the trial of Lt. Andrew K.
NATIONAL
February 3, 2005 | From Associated Press
Conditions at the Abu Ghraib prison were so deplorable that rats and wild dogs were a common sight and edible food and water were scarce, a witness testified Wednesday in the penalty phase for a soldier who has pleaded guilty to abusing detainees. Army Maj. David Dinenna Sr., a leader of Sgt. Javal S. Davis' military police battalion, testified that Abu Ghraib was a bleak and volatile place for the thousands of detainees and their vastly outnumbered guards.
NATIONAL
June 2, 2006 | From the Associated Press
A military jury convicted an Army dog handler Thursday of using his animal to torment a prisoner at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq. Sgt. Santos A. Cardona is the 11th soldier convicted of crimes stemming from the abuse of inmates at the prison in late 2003 and early 2004. Cardona, 32, of Fullerton was convicted of dereliction of duty and aggravated assault for allowing his dog to bark within inches of a prisoner's face.
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