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Abu Ghraib Prison

WORLD
August 28, 2005 | From Associated Press
The U.S. military announced Saturday that it had released nearly 1,000 prisoners from Abu Ghraib prison over the last few days in response to a request by Iraqi authorities. The move, the largest prisoner release to date, followed appeals by Sunni Arabs to start freeing thousands of prisoners who had been in the jail for months without being charged.
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WORLD
August 30, 2004 | From Associated Press
U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Ivan "Chip" Frederick II, who agreed last week to plead guilty to some charges in the Abu Ghraib prison abuse scandal, said in an interview published Sunday that American "secret services" in the jail outside Baghdad had encouraged the humiliation of detainees. But Frederick said he was taking responsibility for what he had done and urged other defendants to do the same. "I will answer for my acts in court, but I hope that others will take my example....
WORLD
June 26, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The Army replaced Maj. Gen. George Fay with a more senior general, Lt. Gen. Anthony R. Jones, as chief investigator into the role of military intelligence in the abuse at Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq. At issue was the need to interview Lt. Gen. Ricardo Sanchez, who has been the top U.S. commander in Iraq. The Army wanted a lead investigator of rank at least equal to Sanchez, who wears three stars. As a major general, Fay wears two.
WORLD
October 23, 2004 | From Times Wire Services
A military judge ordered two U.S. Army reservists to stand trial in Baghdad early next year on charges of abusing Iraqi inmates at Abu Ghraib prison. Spc. Charles A. Graner Jr., 36, of Uniontown, Pa., will face a court-martial Jan. 7, and Sgt. Javal Davis, 26, of Maryland, is tentatively set to be tried Feb. 1. Graner has been charged with conspiracy to maltreat detainees, dereliction of duty, maltreatment of prisoners, assault, committing indecent acts, obstruction of justice and adultery.
NATIONAL
May 24, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The abuse and sexual humiliation that occurred at Iraq's Abu Ghraib prison in 2003 and 2004 was the work of "corrupt cops" who acted for their own enjoyment and without the sanction of their commanders, according to the military's opening statement in the court-martial at Ft. Meade of a U.S. Army dog handler. Military prosecutor Maj. Matthew Miller said Sgt. Santos A.
NATIONAL
September 24, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A psychologist testified that Pvt. Lynndie England suffered from depression and that her mental condition, coupled with an overly compliant personality, made her a heedless participant in the abuse of inmates at Abu Ghraib prison. Xavier Amador, a clinical psychologist from New York, said England's soldier boyfriend, Charles Graner, was her "social accomplice" whom she relied upon without reservation to guide her behavior.
WORLD
August 26, 2004 | From Associated Press
Military prosecutors on Wednesday dismissed three charges against a suspect in the abuse of prisoners at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq, significantly reducing the amount of jail time she could face if convicted. Two counts of cruelty and maltreatment and one of conspiracy had been added after the investigation of Spc. Megan Ambuhl was completed, a step that her lawyers argued was improper and could add three years of prison time. The prosecutor, Capt.
NATIONAL
September 28, 2004 | From Associated Press
Pfc. Lynndie R. England, the soldier seen in some of the most notorious photos with naked Iraqi prisoners at Abu Ghraib prison, will face a court-martial in January on charges of abusing detainees, the Army said Monday. The 21-year-old reservist will be tried on 13 counts of abuse and six counts of indecent acts, said Lt. Gen. John R. Vines, commander of the 18th Airborne Corps at Ft. Bragg, where the trial is scheduled for Jan. 17-28. England did not enter a plea when she was arraigned Friday.
NATIONAL
May 23, 2006 | From the Associated Press
A jury was chosen Monday in the court-martial of a military dog-handler charged with abusing detainees at Iraq's Abu Ghraib prison. Sgt. Santos A. Cardona, 32, is accused of allowing his Belgian shepherd to bite a detainee on the leg badly enough to require stitches and of harassing and threatening another detainee in violation of military code. Defense attorney Harvey J. Volzer contends the aggressive use of dogs was sanctioned high up the chain of command.
WORLD
June 23, 2004 | From Associated Press
A U.S. military court judge Tuesday rejected a motion that sought a new Article 32 investigation into allegations that Staff Sgt. Ivan L. "Chip" Frederick II abused inmates at the Abu Ghraib prison. Ordering a new Article 32 investigation, the military equivalent of a grand jury inquiry, would have been tantamount to dropping the charges against Frederick, one of seven soldiers accused in the scandal. The judge, Col. James Pohl, rejected the motion during a pretrial hearing Tuesday.
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