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BUSINESS
October 6, 2011 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
Electric car pioneer Thomas Gage has resigned as chief executive of vehicle battery maker AC Propulsion Inc. Company officials described the parting as amicable. "Gage's resignation was a joint decision between Gage and the AC Propulsion board of directors. The move will allow AC Propulsion to align more closely with its investors and expanding EV component market in China," the company said. The company said Gage did not say what he plans to do next except that he would remain involved with electric vehicles and would provide more details at a later date.
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BUSINESS
October 6, 2011 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
Electric car pioneer Thomas Gage has resigned as chief executive of vehicle battery maker AC Propulsion Inc. Company officials described the parting as amicable. "Gage's resignation was a joint decision between Gage and the AC Propulsion board of directors. The move will allow AC Propulsion to align more closely with its investors and expanding EV component market in China," the company said. The company said Gage did not say what he plans to do next except that he would remain involved with electric vehicles and would provide more details at a later date.
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BUSINESS
August 30, 2009 | Ken Bensinger
The gig: He doesn't make the cars of the future; he makes the cars of the future go. As chief executive of AC Propulsion Inc., Tom Gage advances the technologies under the hoods of electric transportation. The high-tech batteries and drive systems made by the San Dimas company power a growing number of electric vehicles. Those include a test fleet of BMW's electric Minis, which are currently whooshing -- silently -- over roads in California, New York and New Jersey. From the pits to this: A self-described "car nut" since childhood, Gage moved to Georgia to work as a race mechanic after graduating from Stanford University with an engineering degree.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2010 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
Some vehicles defy easy classification. Take the plug-in electric Peraves E-Tracer, headed for California roads next year. Balanced on two wheels and operated with a throttle, it's similar to a motorcycle. But it's also fully enclosed in a Kevlar fiberglass shell. FOR THE RECORD: E-Tracer electric vehicle: An article in the Nov. 13 Business section about the Peraves E-Tracer, a plug-in electric vehicle, gave the wrong unit of measure for the power rating of its AC induction motor.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2010 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
Some vehicles defy easy classification. Take the plug-in electric Peraves E-Tracer, headed for California roads next year. Balanced on two wheels and operated with a throttle, it's similar to a motorcycle. But it's also fully enclosed in a Kevlar fiberglass shell. FOR THE RECORD: E-Tracer electric vehicle: An article in the Nov. 13 Business section about the Peraves E-Tracer, a plug-in electric vehicle, gave the wrong unit of measure for the power rating of its AC induction motor.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2010 | By Jerry Hirsch
In the e-mail era, the U.S. Postal Service seems hardly plugged in -- but at least it wants its vehicles to be. The postal service has awarded contracts to several California firms to develop a prototype postal van that would run on electricity. The contracts are part of the service's effort to determine whether it can convert some, or even all, of its 142,000 delivery vans to electricity. Such a project would be worth billions of dollars to the companies that win production contracts.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1999
"Gas-Electric Cars May Be Right Mix for U.S. Drivers" [June 26] inaccurately represents the current status of electric vehicles. Electric vehicles have made a respectable showing in the last few years. The "dismal" number of EVs sold in the last three years isn't bad at all when you consider that EVs have been available to consumers in only a couple of regional markets; that most EVs, including Toyota's RAV4 sport-utility, DaimlerChrysler's Epic minivan and Nissan's Altra station wagon are not yet available to consumers; and that GM and Honda have had lackluster marketing aimed more at corporate positioning than moving cars.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2010 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Three vehicles, powered mostly by ethanol and electricity, beat out more than 130 other entries in a $10-million contest to build the world's most fuel-efficient autos. One of the winners, a tandem two-seater that looks like a motorcycle-automobile hybrid, featured a drive train from the same San Dimas company that provided technology for the Tesla Roadster. Another, a four-seater, weighed in at less than 1,000 pounds. The third vehicle was able to accelerate to 60 miles per hour in less than 15 seconds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2000
"Little Car's Big Shadow" (editorial, March 12) misses the real significance of GM's EV1 recall. GM recalled all of the older EV1s, not with the intent to fix them, but to keep them. The second-generation EV1s with improved batteries would make good replacements, but there is already a waiting list for them. Can GM build more? Not easily; it dismantled the EV1 assembly line. GM says it wants to create and build a market for electric vehicles, but its actions speak differently. GM is not alone.
NEWS
October 29, 1998 | JOHN O'DELL
Alan Cocconi likes speed too. He just doesn't think it has to come at the expense of all the dinosaurs who worked so hard to give the world crude oil. He builds a high-performance electric sports car, the tZero, that is rated at 220 horsepower with a 0-to-60 acceleration of 4.9 seconds. An electronics engineer from Caltech, Cocconi, 40, cut his teeth working as a consultant for GM on what became the EV1 electric car now leased through Saturn dealers.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2010 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Three vehicles, powered mostly by ethanol and electricity, beat out more than 130 other entries in a $10-million contest to build the world's most fuel-efficient autos. One of the winners, a tandem two-seater that looks like a motorcycle-automobile hybrid, featured a drive train from the same San Dimas company that provided technology for the Tesla Roadster. Another, a four-seater, weighed in at less than 1,000 pounds. The third vehicle was able to accelerate to 60 miles per hour in less than 15 seconds.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2010 | By Jerry Hirsch
In the e-mail era, the U.S. Postal Service seems hardly plugged in -- but at least it wants its vehicles to be. The postal service has awarded contracts to several California firms to develop a prototype postal van that would run on electricity. The contracts are part of the service's effort to determine whether it can convert some, or even all, of its 142,000 delivery vans to electricity. Such a project would be worth billions of dollars to the companies that win production contracts.
BUSINESS
August 30, 2009 | Ken Bensinger
The gig: He doesn't make the cars of the future; he makes the cars of the future go. As chief executive of AC Propulsion Inc., Tom Gage advances the technologies under the hoods of electric transportation. The high-tech batteries and drive systems made by the San Dimas company power a growing number of electric vehicles. Those include a test fleet of BMW's electric Minis, which are currently whooshing -- silently -- over roads in California, New York and New Jersey. From the pits to this: A self-described "car nut" since childhood, Gage moved to Georgia to work as a race mechanic after graduating from Stanford University with an engineering degree.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1999
"Gas-Electric Cars May Be Right Mix for U.S. Drivers" [June 26] inaccurately represents the current status of electric vehicles. Electric vehicles have made a respectable showing in the last few years. The "dismal" number of EVs sold in the last three years isn't bad at all when you consider that EVs have been available to consumers in only a couple of regional markets; that most EVs, including Toyota's RAV4 sport-utility, DaimlerChrysler's Epic minivan and Nissan's Altra station wagon are not yet available to consumers; and that GM and Honda have had lackluster marketing aimed more at corporate positioning than moving cars.
NEWS
August 2, 2000 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The lime-green VW Bug squatted in the middle of the electric-vehicle parking area, as conspicuously out of place as a fat cockroach in the center of a snow-white linen tablecloth. Obviously a joker pulling a fast one on the parking police at the crowded MainPlace/Santa Ana mall by sticking the electric charger plug under the 2000 New Beetle's gasoline filler cover. But no. A closer inspection revealed that it was, indeed, an electric Beetle.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2006 | John O'Dell, Times Staff Writer
The battery-powered electric car isn't dead yet. Mitsubishi Motors Corp. said in Tokyo today that it would introduce the third generation of its battery-powered electric car Oct. 23. The research vehicle will be tested by two Japanese power companies beginning in January. The car is based on Mitsubishi's popular four-seat mini-car, the i. Mitsubishi says the electric car has a top speed of 80 mph and can travel 80 to 100 miles on a single charge.
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