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Academic Performance Index

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 2000
What Is the API? California's new Academic Performance Index is the cornerstone of Gov. Gray Davis' push to hold schools accountable for student performance. The API includes both a numerical score for each school and rankings of 1 to 10 to show how the school compares with other schools statewide and with schools that are similar.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2013
Across California, 27 schools this year lost their rating on the Academic Performance Index — the key indicator by which schools in the state are judged. The list below has links to the report on each affected school, listed by school district. Beryessa Union Blue Oak Flat-Groveland Unified Burbank Unified Claremont Unified Clear View Elementary Compton Unified Delano Joint Unified Fontana Unified Jurupa Unified Lancaster Morongo Unified New Haven Unified Ontario-Montclair Orange Unified Parlier Unified Pasadena Unified Placerville Unified San Diego Unified Santa Cruz Schools Sweetwater Union Torrance Unified Twin Rivers Unified Vallejo City Unified Wheatland Union
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2001
What Is the API? California's Academic Performance Index is the cornerstone of Gov. Gray Davis' push to hold schools accountable for student performance. This release is the second to indicate whether schools are meeting improvement targets for the Stanford 9 set by the state. Schools must meet those targets--for the school overall and for sizable subgroups within each school--to qualify for cash awards that the state has set aside to encourage academic improvement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2013 | By Howard Blume
Campuses in five Los Angeles County school systems were stripped of their scores on the state's Academic Performance Index over claims of  cheating, other misconduct or mistakes that affected the handling of standardized tests. In all, 27 California schools this year lost their academic rating, an increase from 23 last year. Losing ratings is damaging because a school needs them to meet performance targets. Schools that fail to achieve those targets over several years are exposed to sanctions such as the loss of some funding or even the wholesale removal of administrators and faculty.
NEWS
January 27, 2000
One feature of the state's new Academic Performance Index is causing some double-takes: the comparisons of similar schools. The API, which ranks the state's 6,700 schools based on results from the standardized Stanford 9 exams, includes a numerical score for each school and a ranking of 1 to 10 to show how the school compares statewide and with other campuses that have similar student demographics. That second number, the similar schools rank, is intended as an equalizing factor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2001 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite rising standardized-test scores across Orange County, the county's overall ranking in the state slipped from sixth to seventh, according to new data released Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2003 | Duke Helfand and Cara Mia DiMassa, Times Staff Writers
California high schools, which had been the weak link in efforts to raise achievement levels, showed significant signs of improvement this year on state tests, according to results released Friday. More than two-thirds of high school campuses met test score goals set by the state, twice as many schools as last year, the new statistics showed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2013 | By Howard Blume
Campuses in five Los Angeles County school systems were stripped of their scores on the state's Academic Performance Index over claims of  cheating, other misconduct or mistakes that affected the handling of standardized tests. In all, 27 California schools this year lost their academic rating, an increase from 23 last year. Losing ratings is damaging because a school needs them to meet performance targets. Schools that fail to achieve those targets over several years are exposed to sanctions such as the loss of some funding or even the wholesale removal of administrators and faculty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2012 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
California's key measure of public school quality will be redefined to lessen the impact of standardized test scores under a bill signed into law Wednesday by Gov. Jerry Brown. The law, by Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento), will broaden how the Academic Performance Index is calculated by limiting test scores to 60% for high schools and including graduation rates and other factors. The 1,000-point index, which is currently based entirely on student test scores, has been criticized as an inaccurate gauge of campus quality even as it is widely used by parents to choose schools and real estate agents to sell homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2011 | By Jason Song, Los Angeles Times
More campuses in the Los Angeles school system are reaching state academic goals, but the district is still failing to meet important federal targets, according to data released Wednesday by the state Department of Education. The district scored a 728 last year on the Academic Performance Index, which measures improvement on a 1,000-point scale based on factors such as standardized tests. That represents a 19-point jump for the nation's second-largest district over the previous year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe, This post has been corrected. See below for details.
California public schools lost ground this year in overall academic performance for the first time in a decade, but more than half met state goals for achievement on reading and math standardized tests, according to data released Thursday.   Los Angeles Unified bucked the statewide decline, recording the second highest gain in academic performance among the state's 10 largest school districts. Among them, Los Angeles, San Diego Unified and San Bernardino City improved over last year but the other seven slipped, reflecting a dip that officials have attributed to severe budget cuts and new national learning standards being phased in. L.A. Unified Supt.
OPINION
August 11, 2013
Re "State sees a surprise drop in test scores," Aug. 9 John Rogers, a professor in UCLA's Graduate School of Education & Information Studies, is right: There shouldn't be too much concern about tiny changes in standardized test scores. If we are interested in real gains, let's attack the real problem: poverty. Nearly one-quarter of children in the U.S. live in poverty, which means inadequate diet, lack of healthcare and little or no access to books. The best teaching in the world is of little help when students are hungry, ill and have nothing to read.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2013 | By Stephen Ceasar
California education officials have identified 242 schools statewide where students posted standardized-test-related images on social-networking sites - 16 of which included exam questions or answers that could be deemed cheating violations. Hundreds of photos turned up online this year during the administration of the Standardized Testing and Reporting exams, which make up most of the school's state rating on the Academic Performance Index. Test scores were released Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2013 | By Stephen Ceasar
California education officials have identified 242 schools statewide where students posted standardized test-related images on social-networking sites  - 16 of which included exam questions or answers that could be deemed as cheating violations. Hundreds of photos turned up online this year during the administration of the Standardized Testing and Reporting exams, which make up most of the school's state rating on the Academic Performance Index. Test scores were released Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2013 | By Dalina Castellanos, Los Angeles Times
More than half of the teachers and staff at Crenshaw High School, including two teachers union representatives, are being displaced by a campus reorganization process ordered by L.A. Unified Supt. John Deasy. The school board in January endorsed Deasy's plan to remake the traditional high school into three magnets and require teachers to reapply for their jobs. The move came after years of high dropout rates and low student test scores at the school. Student action clubs disseminated a survey on campus after the board's vote and presented its results at a meeting this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2013 | By Kelly Corrigan
A McKinley Elementary teacher has been placed on administrative leave after a third-grade student reported that the teacher helped a class answer questions on state standardized tests this week. Burbank Unified Supt. Jan Britz, who made the announcement during Thursday's school board meeting, added that state officials are investigating the case. Still uncertain of the alleged infraction's full consequences, Britz said state officials could mark the test scores as invalid and potentially strip McKinley of its Academic Performance Index, or API, score, later this year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2012 | Sandy Banks
I was prepared for the dog-and-pony show - the choreographed "reveal" of a school makeover that's been in the works for years. I didn't expect much beyond a grown-up version of show-and-tell. But I came anyway because I have a soft spot for Jordan High in Watts. I've spent a decade tracking the school's efforts to improve; watched reformers arrive with big plans and leave with broken dreams. The school's problems, they'd say, are too deep and expensive to fix; too intertwined with a neighborhood that will always be warped by dysfunction and poverty.
OPINION
November 9, 2012
While the Obama administration is putting increased emphasis on standardized tests to measure teachers and schools, California is moving in the other direction. A new law will limit how heavily the annual standards exams can count toward a school's score on the state's Academic Performance Index. We think California has the better approach. Though the tests, which measure whether students are at grade level in various academic subjects, have value as an objective measurement of student progress, they were never intended to become the sole criterion by which good education is measured, and they shouldn't be. In too many classrooms, the result has been a creativity-stifling tendency to drill students for the multiple-choice tests.
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