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Academic Requirements

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SPORTS
December 13, 1988 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court, in a key ruling supporting the enforcement powers of the National Collegiate Athletic Assn., ruled Monday that the organization may force Nevada Las Vegas to suspend its highly successful basketball coach, Jerry Tarkanian, for recruiting violations and other irregularities. On a 5-4 vote, the high court said that the NCAA does not have to follow the same constitutional guidelines that cover government agencies in investigating violations of regulations.
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SPORTS
November 15, 2012 | Eric Sondheimer
Dominique Hatfield won't forget the moment last month that his football coach at Crenshaw High, Robert Garrett, told him a letter had just come in via school fax machine. It was a scholarship offer from the University of Utah. "It almost brought me to tears," Hatfield said. "I started jumping and hugged Coach Garrett. " He sent a text to his mother, Meka. She called 15 minutes later. "She was screaming," Hatfield said. The same joy was felt by Hatfield's teammate, Mossi Johnson, when UCLA offered him a scholarship last month.
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SPORTS
September 28, 1991 | ROBYN NORWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The UC Irvine men's basketball team has lost a potential starter with the departure of Cornelius Banks, a junior forward who failed to successfully complete academic work required for him to remain in school. "Mr. Banks is no longer a student at the University of California Irvine," Coach Rod Baker said Friday. "I'm disappointed he's not with us. We'll miss his playing ability, his basketball skills. But we still have student-athletes. You have to do both parts." Banks, who averaged 7.
HEALTH
April 18, 2011
A hard field to break into Genetic counselors say they love their work, and the field appears to be on the rise. But breaking in isn't easy. Would-be genetic counselors need to earn a master's degree from an accredited genetic counseling program — if they can get into one. There are only 30 such programs in the United States and three in Canada, and most accept just a handful of candidates per class. Most years, only about 225 people graduate from genetic counseling programs nationwide, says Karin Dent, president of the National Society of Genetic Counselors.
SPORTS
August 8, 1990 | JIM LINDGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Freshmen John McCartney, a Times' All-County defensive back from Lincoln High, and Michael Landry, a cornerback from Marrero, La., have been declared ineligible to play football at San Diego State this fall, Coach Al Luginbill said Tuesday. McCartney failed to score 700 points on the Scholastic Aptitude Test and Landry a 15 on the American College Test, the minimums required by the NCAA for freshman eligibility.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1989 | MIKE REILLEY, Times Staff Writer
Derek Brown, who set Orange County's single-season rushing record while at Servite High School, said Thursday he will attend the University of Nebraska this fall but will sit out his freshman year because he failed to meet academic standards under Proposition 48. Brown, 5-feet-11 and 180 pounds, said he didn't score the required 700 points on his Scholastic Aptitude Test. He said he didn't remember what his score was. Under National Collegiate Athletic Assn.
SPORTS
August 31, 1989 | SAM MARCHIANO, Times Staff Writer
Last football season, their names dominated the high school headlines: Curtis Conway, Russell White and Derek Brown. Each was a brilliant athlete and could stake a legitimate claim to being the best player in Southern California. Naturally, all three were offered scholarships to major colleges. Yet, none of them will be playing football this season.
SPORTS
November 15, 2012 | Eric Sondheimer
Dominique Hatfield won't forget the moment last month that his football coach at Crenshaw High, Robert Garrett, told him a letter had just come in via school fax machine. It was a scholarship offer from the University of Utah. "It almost brought me to tears," Hatfield said. "I started jumping and hugged Coach Garrett. " He sent a text to his mother, Meka. She called 15 minutes later. "She was screaming," Hatfield said. The same joy was felt by Hatfield's teammate, Mossi Johnson, when UCLA offered him a scholarship last month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1996 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kensington University has no classrooms, laboratories or dorms. Its students don't play football, join fraternities or linger dreamily on a quadrangle. In fact, the entire campus is housed in a small Glendale office building. Recruiting from across the nation, the school runs a program in which students studying entirely at home can earn anything from a bachelor's degree to a doctorate--all without ever attending a single class or even meeting their instructors face to face.
SPORTS
April 29, 1990 | STEVE ELLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deborah Lopez, mother of one of Southern California's best grade-school basketball players, was more than a little occupied with her 23-month-old twin sons. They squirmed and tugged as she walked into the gym at Campbell Hall School in North Hollywood two months ago. But the twins were not the only ones competing for her attention. Lopez was being followed by a man she had just met. He wore a blue jacket embossed with the logo of a high school all-star game. He was carrying a notebook and pen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2008 | Jason Song
The state Board of Education unanimously approved a plan Thursday to help 97 school districts meet federal academic standards. The action, submitted by California Supt. of Public Instruction Jack O'Connell and endorsed by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, mandates different levels of assistance to the districts, ranging from analysis by state intervention teams to districts revising their education plans. All of the districts have failed to meet No Child Left Behind Act guidelines. About a dozen local districts, including the Los Angeles Unified School District, are part of the group targeted by the state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2007 | Adrian G. Uribarri, Times Staff Writer
On Saturdays, Chris Lopez makes about $100 selling tickets at a Glendale nightclub. It's good money for a 17-year-old, but after he graduates from Lincoln High School, Lopez wants to go to college and study law or criminal justice. There's one problem, though: He won't have time to finish the classes he needs to apply. Months before graduation, Lopez learned that he hasn't taken enough of the academic classes necessary to be admitted to a four-year state university.
WORLD
October 17, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A Chinese university aiming to produce "socially elite" graduates plans to make golf compulsory for students, state media reported. Students majoring in management, law, economics and software engineering at Xiamen University in Fujian province would be required to take golf "to achieve their elite ambitions," the China Daily newspaper said. "Golf ... will teach students communication skills and benefit their future careers," the paper quoted university President Zhu Chongshi as saying.
NATIONAL
March 24, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The state House passed a bill that would require high school students to declare a major, just as college students do. The Republican-sponsored bill, backed by Gov. Jeb Bush, passed 85 to 35 on a straight party-line vote. It faces an uncertain future in the Senate. Bush and others say that requiring high school students to declare a major and concentrate on a particular field could prepare them better for college.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2006 | Hemmy So, Times Staff Writer
Two schools in Los Angeles County are among the first to undergo state sanctions for insufficient academic improvement over the last three years under a new voluntary program for troubled campuses, education officials said Tuesday. Antelope Valley High School and Wilsona Elementary School, both in Lancaster, are among six campuses facing the new measures in the state's Immediate Intervention/Underperforming Schools Program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2006 | Duke Helfand, Times Staff Writer
This year's high school seniors with disabilities would be spared from California's new high school exit exam under a legislative agreement announced Thursday. A deal negotiated by state officials would excuse seniors from that obligation if they have physical, learning or emotional disabilities that may have contributed to past failures on the test. Existing rules would have required all students in the class of 2006 to pass the test of English and math to earn diplomas.
SPORTS
August 22, 1987
Michael Harden, who signed with Temple out of Baton Rouge, La., failed to meet the National Collegiate Athletic Assn.'s academic requirements and will not be eligible to play this season.
SPORTS
December 24, 1990
Six-foot-7 forward Troy McKoy will not be eligible to play for No. 16 South Carolina this season because he did not meet academic requirements, school officials said.
SPORTS
August 26, 2005 | Gary Klein, Times Staff Writer
Matt Leinart could tango with teammates at the Rose Bowl if USC wins a third consecutive national title. The Heisman Trophy winner might perform the Nightclub Two-Step in New York if he wins another. This much is certain: As the Trojans' senior quarterback pursues those milestones on the field this season, he will waltz through the fall semester in the classroom.
NATIONAL
June 10, 2005 | From Associated Press
High school students here must take a course in African and African American history as a requirement for graduation starting with the next freshman class, officials said Thursday. Leaders of the school district, where two-thirds of students are black, hope the course will not only keep those students interested in their academic work but give others a more accurate view of history. "We have the opportunity ...
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