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Academy Award Nominations

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 2011 | By Adam Tschorn, Los Angeles Times
Hollywood costume designer Theadora Van Runkle, whose influence spanned four decades and a range of movie genres including period pieces like "Bonnie and Clyde" — which earned her the first of three Academy Award nominations — and over-the-top comedies like 1989's "Troop Beverly Hills," has died. She was 83. Van Runkle died Friday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles of lung cancer, the Costume Designers Guild announced. Born March 27, 1928, in Pittsburgh, Van Runkle made connections in the entertainment industry not long after that.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2011 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
In an effort to rein in what many in Hollywood felt was excessive Oscar campaigning last winter, the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences on Wednesday issued new rules governing how studios and filmmakers can tout their movies to voters this season. The guidelines seek to curtail some of the lavish parties thrown by studios and encourage the actual viewing of films in theaters. The changes could give a boost to smaller outfits that don't have as much money to spend on campaigns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2011 | Dennis McLellan
Sidney Lumet, the prolific four-time Oscar-nominated director known for guiding strong performances in classic films such as "12 Angry Men," "Dog Day Afternoon and "Network," died Saturday. He was 86. Lumet, whose film career spanned more than 50 years, died of lymphoma at his home in New York, his family said. Once described in Variety as "the quintessential New York filmmaker," Lumet shot a large number of his films in his hometown, including "The Pawnbroker," "Serpico" and many others.
NEWS
February 10, 2011 | By Glenn Whipp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Jeff Bridges had to sort through what he calls an "interesting batch of emotions" when the Coen brothers approached him with the idea of playing Rooster Cogburn in "True Grit. " "I said, 'Why do you want to remake that,' you know?" Bridges recalls. "But they were thinking about the book and not the movie, which was a relief for me. I didn't want to be emulating John Wayne. Who would?" He pauses, shakes his head and lets out a laugh. "Who could?" Bridges made the whiskey-soaked marshal enough of his own man to win an Oscar nomination, making Cogburn the 16th film character to earn more than one actor love from academy voters.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Ethel Waters The famed blues, jazz and gospel vocalist (1896-1977) made her movie debut in the 1929 musical "On With the Show!" She became the second African American to earn an Oscar nomination, for her supporting role in the 1949 drama "Pinky. " Hattie McDaniel The first African American (1895-1952) to win an Academy Award, for her supporting role as Mammy in 1939's "Gone with the Wind. " When the NAACP complained in the 1940s about her playing servant roles, she said, "I'd rather play a maid and make $700 a week then be one for $7. " Dorothy Dandridge The beautiful singer and actress (1922-65)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2011 | By Rebecca Keegan and Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
There are many roads to Oscar. But perhaps the surest ones lead through the offices of two moviemakers responsible for 31 of this year's Academy Award nominations, including those of the two best picture front-runners, "The King's Speech" and "The Social Network. " With brash personalities and refined tastes in film, producer Scott Rudin and studio head Harvey Weinstein represent an endangered species in an increasingly buttoned-up, corporate Hollywood. In a cinematic era in which studio films are driven by superheroes and sequels, they champion ostensibly uncommercial movies ?
NEWS
January 25, 2011 | By Susan King and Rene Lynch, Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
"The King's Speech" dominated the Oscar nominations on Tuesday morning, earning 12 nods including best picture and best lead actor for Colin Firth as King George VI, who battles to eradicate his stammer before he unexpectedly takes the throne. Joel and Ethan Coen's spirited remake of the western "True Grit" followed with 10 nominations for the 83rd annual Academy Awards, including best picture. "The Social Network" and "Inception" scored eight apiece. Those four films are in the running for best picture with six other movies: "Black Swan," "The Fighter," "The Kids Are All Right," "127 Hours," "Toy Story 3" and "Winter's Bone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2011 | From a Los Angeles Times staff writer
Actress Susannah York, who was nominated for an Academy Award for her role in the 1969 film "They Shoot Horses, Don't They?", has died. She was 72. York died of cancer, according to several British media reports on Saturday. No other details were given. Known for her beauty and versatility, she became a star in the 1960s after roles in such films as "Tom Jones" in 1963 and "A Man for All Seasons" in 1966. "They Shoot Horses, Don't They?" was the story of marathon dance contestants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Gloria Stuart, a 1930s Hollywood leading lady who earned an Academy Award nomination for her first significant role in nearly 60 years — as Old Rose, the centenarian survivor of the Titanic in James Cameron's 1997 Oscar-winning film — has died. She was 100. Stuart, a founding member of the Screen Actors Guild who later became an accomplished painter and fine printer, died Sunday night at her West Los Angeles home, said her daughter, writer Sylvia Thompson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2010 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Robert B. Radnitz, an English teacher turned movie producer who made some of Hollywood's more distinguished family fare, including "Sounder" and "Island of the Blue Dolphins," has died. He was 85. Radnitz died Sunday at his Malibu home from complications of a stroke he had years ago, said his wife, Pearl. With the release of his first film in 1959 – the boy-and-his-dog tale "A Dog of Flanders" – Radnitz started to develop a reputation as a maker of high-quality movies for children and their parents.
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