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Academy Of Motion Picture Arts And Sciences

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1997 | JOHN M. GONZALES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
And the Oscar goes to: Nobody. For the second year in a row, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences can thumb its nose at Christie's after the auction house failed Saturday to sell Claudette Colbert's 1934 Oscar for the film "It Happened One Night." Last year, Christie's ignored the Academy's protests and auctioned off Clark Gable's gold-plated statuette from the same film for $607,500.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1994 | TERRY PRISTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Closing the door on a controversy that erupted more than a year ago, leaders of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences have decided to continue awarding Oscars for short live-action films and short documentaries. The Academy's Board of Governors voted unanimously in favor of both categories late Tuesday night after a brief discussion.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2005 | Elaine Dutka, Times Staff Writer
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences on Wednesday settled disputes about the recipients of producer credit on two nominees for best picture, "The Aviator" and "Million Dollar Baby." The academy was spared a third deliberation because the filmmakers behind "Ray" had independently whittled the credited producers down to three -- the maximum allowed under new rules. The rules are part of an effort to limit the number of producers who come onstage to collect the top Oscar.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1998 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forget the envelope. Tell Billy Crystal he won't have to include them in his monologue. Once again, the Oscar nominations are in and along with those who made it are those who didn't. Leonardo DiCaprio may be the current heartthrob among girls around the world, but his critically acclaimed performance as a doomed lover in "Titanic" failed to receive a best actor nomination this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new exhibition of vintage photographs of silent-film great Buster Keaton offers a unique glimpse into the life and career of the screen clown who starred in and directed such groundbreaking comedies as "The General," "The Cameraman" and "Sherlock Jr." "Buster Keaton Revisited: Rare Photographs of a Comic Genius," opening Friday at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Grand Lobby Gallery in Beverly Hills, features 72 Keaton pictures, many created from original negatives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1998 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The lawyer said her comedian client's boast about crashing the Academy Awards was just a joke. But the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences was not amused. And neither was the judge. On Wednesday, in the latest skirmish between fame and freedom of speech, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Auerlio Munoz ordered comic Scott Kerman, author of a tongue-in-cheek gate crashing guide, to stay away from the Oscars this year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1989 | NINA J. EASTON, Times Staff Writer
Who would have thought that Snow White, of all people, would become the source of Oscar night's only major glitch? The Walt Disney Co. filed suit in Los Angeles federal court Thursday against the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, charging copyright infringement of its Snow White character and unfair competition.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1998 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The question was put to Curtis Hanson, director of Oscar-nominated "L.A. Confidential": Did it bother him to hear prognosticators say it's a foregone conclusion that "Titanic" will win best picture at this year's Academy Awards? "You know, it was a foregone conclusion that the ship was going to get to New York," Hanson quipped as a Beverly Hills hotel room filled with the world's entertainment press erupted in laughter. "We'll see what happens," Hanson said with a shrug.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1993 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time in its 65-year history, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences on Thursday rescinded an Oscar nomination, taking "A Place in the World" out of contention for best foreign-language film of 1992. No other film will be nominated in its place, the academy said in a Thursday announcement. Shortly after Oscar nominations were announced last week, questions were raised that the movie, submitted by Uruguay, may be more of a product of Argentina.
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