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Acapulco

NEWS
May 1, 1985 | United Press International
A smoking engine forced the pilot of an Acapulco-bound American Airlines Boeing 727 to abort takeoff as the plane sped down the runway at O'Hare Airport, officials said today. Turbine blades from the smoking engine were hurled across the runway, forcing evacuation of the 48 passengers and a crew of seven aboard Flight 169 on Tuesday, the Federal Aviation Administration said. There were no injuries.
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WORLD
October 21, 2013 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY -- A hurricane with sustained winds of up to 120 mph was spinning off of Mexico's Pacific coast on Monday, threatening to bring more suffering to a country still recovering from dozens of deaths and massive destruction caused by a combined hurricane and tropical storm last month. Hurricane Raymond, classified as a Category 3 storm, was about 125 miles south-southwest of the resort city of Zihuatanejo early Monday morning, its eye approximately 12 miles wide, according to Conagua, Mexico's national water commission.
MAGAZINE
January 4, 1987
I just returned from four days in Baja California and was delighted--and maybe dismayed about the publicity--to see "The Baja Boom" (by Alan Weisman, Nov. 30). I am an ardent admirer of all of Baja and plan on retiring there. The only problem, as I see it, is that in the not-too-distant future, the whole world will discover Baja and turn it into another Palm Springs, Rosarito Beach or Acapulco, and it will lose all its charm. Steve Barstow Glendale
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1990
In the years that I have had the distinct pleasure of seeing my work being performed in Los Angeles, I have always had the greatest respect for Sylvie Drake's perceptive and, in my case, supportive reviews. So it was the more surprising to suffer the indignity of my play, "Acapulco," casually dismissed as sex, sex, sex, when it is about anything but sex. It is a comedy about human behavior, as witness the audience who, on the night Drake was in, laughed from beginning to end, although this was omitted from the review.
TRAVEL
January 22, 2006
I'M sure I won't be the only one to write about your suggestion to "take the risk of getting traveler's diarrhea" in your story on college students' travel tips ["Fear Not Frog Leg Soup, and Other Tips," Travel Insider, Jan. 8]. Perhaps I was thinking that when I ate seafood at a quaint little eatery on the waterfront of Puerto Montt, Chile. I contracted hepatitis A. I also ate oysters on the beach in Acapulco, Mexico, to my strong regret. My wife contracted E. coli from a meal at a nice restaurant in Lyon and spent five days in hospitals in France.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1985 | LAURA CASTANEDA, Associated Press
Tom Flores has suffered from emphysema for most of his 70 years, but over the past 10 it has been so hard to breathe that he did not dare stray far from home during vacations. Then, last year, a medically supervised cruise sponsored by John Muir Hospital in Walnut Creek gave Flores the chance to see the world, worry-free.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1987 | JACK JONES, Times Staff Writer
Three San Pedro residents whose yacht had capsized and sank in a storm were landed safely on the southern coast of Mexico Tuesday by the fishing vessel that rescued them after they had drifted for eight days in a life raft. "It was a terrible experience," recalled retired free-lance photographer Fred Poore, 56, Tuesday night after he and his wife, Patsy, and their friend, Ernest Carson, 47, reached the small port of Salina Cruz, more than 300 miles below Acapulco.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1987 | DAVID FREED, Times Staff Writer
Ten people in the Los Angeles area have begun receiving preventive treatment for rabies after being exposed to an infected stray cat that was found in Acapulco by an unsuspecting North Hollywood woman and brought to the United States two weeks ago. County health authorities said Monday it is the first recorded instance in 12 years in Los Angeles County of anyone being exposed to the deadly disease.
MAGAZINE
June 3, 1990 | Amy Wallace, Amy Wallace is a reporter for the San Diego edition of The Times.
EVERYBODY IN LA JOLLA knew the Brodericks. Daniel T. Broderick III and his wife, Betty, seemed to have a classic society-page marriage. Dan was a celebrity in local legal circles. Armed with degrees from both Harvard Law School and Cornell School of Medicine, the prominent malpractice attorney was aggressive, persuasive and cunning--a $1-million-a-year lawyer at the top of his game.
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