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Acapulco

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2002 | JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Javier and Salvador Parra, brothers who lived and worked together, and died together in a puzzling shooting last week, were remembered Friday night at a wake. The brothers' bodies will be sent Monday to their hometown near Acapulco, Mexico. They will be buried in the municipal cemetery in Acapulco after a viewing at a local funeral home. Money to send them home came from a state program that provides victims of crime with funeral benefits. "In life, they were always together.
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NEWS
October 8, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A strong earthquake shook southern and central Mexico, causing buildings to sway and people to flee into the streets throughout Mexico City. There were no immediate indications of major damage or injuries. The U.S. Geological Survey said the quake had a magnitude of 5.5 and was centered 25 miles north of Acapulco. Mexico's National Seismological Services said the magnitude was 6.1. Mexico City, built on a former lake bed of silty soil, often feels quakes that are centered hundreds of miles
NEWS
June 27, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Armed men have kidnapped one of the leading U.S. businessmen in Acapulco, officials said. Real estate agent Ron Lavender was in a car on the resort city's waterfront when it was intercepted by two vehicles. Lavender was forced to get into one of the vehicles, City Councilwoman Gloria Maria Sierra said. Mayor Zeferino Torreblanca also confirmed Lavender's abduction. Lavender, an Iowa native, moved to Acapulco in 1954 and is one of its best-known real estate agents.
BUSINESS
November 17, 2000 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Connecticut investment firm Bruckmann, Rosser, Sherrill & Co. added another California restaurant chain to its portfolio Thursday, agreeing to buy Il Fornaio (America) Corp. for about $81.4 million. Fornaio shareholders will receive $14 a share in cash for each share they hold, Chief Financial Officer Peter Hausback. After the transaction is completed, some executives and stockholders will retain a significant stake in the company, which is to be taken private. The Corte Madera, Calif.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2000 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prandium Inc., an Irvine restaurant holding company awash in debt, said Tuesday that it is selling its flagship El Torito restaurants for $130 million to an investment group that owns the rival Acapulco restaurant chain in Long Beach. The deal marks one of several involving Orange County-based restaurant chains in recent months, including El Pollo Loco and Marie Callender Pie Shops Inc. Two other Irvine-based chains, Coco's and Carrows, have been put up for sale by Advantica Restaurant Group.
NEWS
September 27, 1999 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't so many years ago when contestants on TV game shows shrieked with delight at hearing these words: "And your first prize is an all-expenses-paid vacation for two in . . . sunny Acapulco!" The original jet-set mecca and a getaway for Hollywood stars in the 1950s and '60s, Acapulco long ago slipped from the spotlight. As dazzling younger starlets like Cancun and Los Cabos took center stage, the grand diva of Mexican beach resorts became something of a faded, overly made-up vamp.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1999 | KENNETH TURAN, Kenneth Turan is The Times' film critic
"We are like Cyrano. We know we cannot win, but we fight. We are a loser, but a faithful loser." --Daniel Toscan du Plantier, president, Unifrance Film International * It's hot here, jungle hot. The sultry air seems almost perfumed from the flourishing hibiscus and bougainvillea.
SPORTS
February 18, 1999 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Men armed with rifles kidnapped the father of Mexican soccer star Jorge Campos on Wednesday at a sports field in Acapulco named for his son. Two relatives confirmed the kidnapping on condition of anonymity, saying they feared for the life of Alvaro Campos. "There were six or eight people with their faces uncovered . . . but nobody recognized them," said one relative. "They took out their guns and took him aboard a pickup truck to an unknown place."
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