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Accident Prevention

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1992 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite protests from skateboarders, the City Council on Monday banned the sport entirely from the city's boardwalk to avoid more collisions--and more lawsuits. "We are trying to make it possible to accommodate an impossible situation on that sidewalk," Councilwoman Ruthelyn Plummer said. "I'm sorry, but the skateboards are just one more burden on the sidewalk."
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BUSINESS
November 24, 2011 | By Rosanna Xia, Los Angeles Times
At this year's L.A. Auto Show, carmakers are highlighting safety features that focus on preventing accidents rather than merely surviving them. Warning indicators for blind spots and rearview cameras have become common, but many manufacturers are taking the technologies a step further. The additional features act on the safety warnings when a driver fails to do so, said Jeremy Anwyl, chief executive of online auto research firm Edmunds Inc. "I think they are too easy to ignore," he said of the warnings.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1990
In a bid to cut the number of near-collisions, counselors from the Federal Aviation Administration will hold a Project START (Safe Terminal Area Route Training) seminar for area pilots Aug. 2 at the Los Alamitos Armed Forces Reserve Center. Recent government reports have listed the Orange-Los Angeles counties' skies as having the worst near-collision rate in the country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2010 | By Kate Linthicum
In a sting aimed at curbing accidents along the Blue Line, police and sheriff's deputies staked out a two-mile stretch of the line's tracks in downtown Los Angeles on Wednesday and ticketed nearly 300 jaywalkers and drivers they caught using cellphones and making illegal left turns. Transportation officials said the crackdown was the latest effort in a push to improve safety along the Blue Line, the city's oldest and most popular light rail line but also its most dangerous. Ninety-nine people have died in accidents and suicides involving the line in the nearly 20 years since the service from Los Angeles to Long Beach began.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1995 | LISA RESPERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Drowsy after a long day and a few beers, Brandon Silveria said, his eyes closed for a second or two as he drove home from a high school party. His next memory came 18 months later at a rehabilitation facility. Silveria, 24, now tours the country sharing his story with teen-agers, encouraging them to be smarter than he was 7 1/2 years ago when the combination of alcohol and fatigue caused him to lose control of his car and slam into a tree.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1998 | CHRISTINE CASTRO and DEBRA CANO and LINN GROVES
Municipal employees set a record in 1997-98 for the lowest accident rate in the city's history, officials said. During that period, for every 80,233 hours worked, only one disabling injury--an impairment requiring the loss of at least one full day of work--occurred. Fifteen years ago, the city established a safety action plan that set accident prevention as a primary goal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1986 | TOWNSEND DAVIS
The downtown car-trolley collision Wednesday that left two men injured came at a time of decreasing accidents on the line and does not point to a need for more safeguards, according to trolley officials. The accident was probably unavoidable and the operator remains in good standing with an excellent record, according to Pete Tereschuck, manager of transportation for San Diego Trolley.
SPORTS
February 11, 2001 | ED HINTON, TRIBUNE MOTOR SPORTS WRITER
About the Project This is the result of six months of research and reporting by Tribune Auto Race Writer Ed Hinton, with help from staffers at other Tribune papers, among them Darin Esper of the Los Angeles Times. It sheds new light on the decline of traditional fatalism among race drivers and the need for more research and action to prevent the violent deaths the sport has come to accept.
BUSINESS
July 9, 1993 | Michael Flagg / Times staff writer
It has been two years since the Injury and Illness Prevention Act--better known as SB 198--became law. It says that if you run a business, you must have a written plan to prevent injuries and illness in your workplace. But many small businesses haven't bothered to write up such a plan, says a dean at UC Irvine. With a $200,000 grant, Daniel Stokols at the School of Social Ecology will now study ways of coaxing those businesses to comply.
NEWS
December 5, 1991 | ROXANA KOPETMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Long Beach Police Department--where virtually every patrol car was involved in a traffic accident during the last fiscal year--is considering a driver awareness program to improve a collision record that cost the city $147,000 in damages, according to a department memo. The department, which has 101 black-and-white cruisers, reported 155 collisions--about 1 1/2 accidents per car. More than half of those could have been prevented, said the Nov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2010 | By Robert J. Lopez and Dan Weikel and Rich Connell
Federal safety officials called for railroads to install cameras and voice recorders in every locomotive cab in the nation as they publicly warned Thursday that cellphone texting by engineers and conductors was a growing and lethal danger. The call came as members of the National Transportation Safety Board publicly concluded their investigation into the deadly collision of a commuter train and a freight train in Chatsworth in 2008 -- a crash they blamed on a Metrolink engineer who passed a stop signal as he sent a message from his phone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2010 | By Dan Weikel
Federal railroad officials Tuesday unveiled regulations for equipping the nation's freight and passenger trains with automated braking systems required by Congress after the deadly 2008 Metrolink crash in Chatsworth. "We believe this final rule, as mandated by Congress, is a giant step toward ensuring the safety and reliability of our freight, commuter and intercity passenger rail routes," said Joseph Szabo, administrator of the Federal Railroad Administration. The rules will regulate the design and installation of positive train control technology that must be implemented on all freight and passenger railroads by December 2015.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2009 | By Rich Connell
Nearly five years after a deadly Metrolink train wreck in Glendale intensified debate about passenger car design, Southern California's commuter rail service will soon take delivery of new high-tech, crash-resistant cars, officials announced Thursday. Two of the new-generation cars, the first of their kind in the nation, are to be unloaded from a ship in the Port of Long Beach in mid-January and will be put into service as early as next summer, agency officials said in a news conference at a Metrolink maintenance yard northeast of downtown Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2009 | By Rich Connell
More than a decade ago, Metrolink and other commuter rail services throughout California sought and received permission to bypass a federal requirement to install simple safety signs intended to help avoid accidents like last year's Chatsworth disaster. The action was disclosed this week in a technical and financial analysis of high-tech train collision avoidance systems prepared by the staff of the state Public Utilities Commission, which shares some oversight responsibilities for commuter rail systems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2009 | Rich Connell
As the anniversary of the Sept. 12 Chatsworth train disaster approaches, officials with Southern California's sprawling commuter rail service are facing a vexing array of technical, financial and potential legal challenges as they struggle to deliver on pledges of trailblazing safety reforms. A burst of energy to remake the region's Metrolink train operation was unleashed by the deadliest rail collision in modern California history, a watershed event that killed 25, injured 130 and prompted landmark federal mandates to modernize the nation's rail safety systems.
NATIONAL
July 1, 2009 | Richard Simon
Stephen Owings, whose 22-year-old son died when his car was rear-ended, is fighting to have the federal government require the use of speed-limiting devices on all big rigs, saying: "We're not against truckers; we're pro-highway safety." Most often, citizen-crusaders find themselves in lonely, unequal struggles against industry groups and lobbyists. But this time, David and Goliath seem to be on the same side. Owings has drawn support from the American Trucking Assns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2010 | By Robert J. Lopez and Dan Weikel and Rich Connell
Federal safety officials called for railroads to install cameras and voice recorders in every locomotive cab in the nation as they publicly warned Thursday that cellphone texting by engineers and conductors was a growing and lethal danger. The call came as members of the National Transportation Safety Board publicly concluded their investigation into the deadly collision of a commuter train and a freight train in Chatsworth in 2008 -- a crash they blamed on a Metrolink engineer who passed a stop signal as he sent a message from his phone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1993 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly a year after Woodland Hills teen-ager Adam Bischoff drowned in the storm-swollen Los Angeles River, city and county officials on Wednesday unveiled a program for Los Angeles County schools aimed at preventing children from dying in flood-control channels.
NATIONAL
May 15, 2009 | Rebecca Cole
An alarm that would warn pilots earlier of dangerously slow aircraft speed could have helped prevent a plane crash that killed 50 people in February, safety officials told an investigative panel Thursday. National Transportation Safety Board member Debbie Hersman raised the idea on the third and final day of a hearing into the crash of Continental Connection Flight 3407, which went down near Buffalo, N.Y., killing all 49 people aboard and one person on the ground.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2009 | Steve Hymon
While traffic officials applaud a new law that makes it illegal for drivers to read, write or send text messages, they admit there is little evidence that last year's ban against talking on a hand-held cellphone has actually prevented accidents. Since holding a phone to your ear was made a traffic violation last July, the California Highway Patrol has written about 48,000 tickets, fining drivers from $20 to $50.
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