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Accident Prevention

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1992 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite protests from skateboarders, the City Council on Monday banned the sport entirely from the city's boardwalk to avoid more collisions--and more lawsuits. "We are trying to make it possible to accommodate an impossible situation on that sidewalk," Councilwoman Ruthelyn Plummer said. "I'm sorry, but the skateboards are just one more burden on the sidewalk."
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BUSINESS
November 24, 2011 | By Rosanna Xia, Los Angeles Times
At this year's L.A. Auto Show, carmakers are highlighting safety features that focus on preventing accidents rather than merely surviving them. Warning indicators for blind spots and rearview cameras have become common, but many manufacturers are taking the technologies a step further. The additional features act on the safety warnings when a driver fails to do so, said Jeremy Anwyl, chief executive of online auto research firm Edmunds Inc. "I think they are too easy to ignore," he said of the warnings.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1990
In a bid to cut the number of near-collisions, counselors from the Federal Aviation Administration will hold a Project START (Safe Terminal Area Route Training) seminar for area pilots Aug. 2 at the Los Alamitos Armed Forces Reserve Center. Recent government reports have listed the Orange-Los Angeles counties' skies as having the worst near-collision rate in the country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2008 | Steve Hymon, Hymon is a Times staff writer.
A state authority is set to decide next week whether transportation planners have done enough to make the Expo Line safe as it passes two South Los Angeles schools. Some residents and school officials want the rail line to either be put underground or on a bridge near one or both schools. Builders of the $862-million line say that would unnecessarily drive up costs and probably delay a transit system that could open by 2010 and provide an alternative to the Westside's traffic congestion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1995 | LISA RESPERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Drowsy after a long day and a few beers, Brandon Silveria said, his eyes closed for a second or two as he drove home from a high school party. His next memory came 18 months later at a rehabilitation facility. Silveria, 24, now tours the country sharing his story with teen-agers, encouraging them to be smarter than he was 7 1/2 years ago when the combination of alcohol and fatigue caused him to lose control of his car and slam into a tree.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1998 | CHRISTINE CASTRO and DEBRA CANO and LINN GROVES
Municipal employees set a record in 1997-98 for the lowest accident rate in the city's history, officials said. During that period, for every 80,233 hours worked, only one disabling injury--an impairment requiring the loss of at least one full day of work--occurred. Fifteen years ago, the city established a safety action plan that set accident prevention as a primary goal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1986 | TOWNSEND DAVIS
The downtown car-trolley collision Wednesday that left two men injured came at a time of decreasing accidents on the line and does not point to a need for more safeguards, according to trolley officials. The accident was probably unavoidable and the operator remains in good standing with an excellent record, according to Pete Tereschuck, manager of transportation for San Diego Trolley.
SPORTS
February 11, 2001 | ED HINTON, TRIBUNE MOTOR SPORTS WRITER
About the Project This is the result of six months of research and reporting by Tribune Auto Race Writer Ed Hinton, with help from staffers at other Tribune papers, among them Darin Esper of the Los Angeles Times. It sheds new light on the decline of traditional fatalism among race drivers and the need for more research and action to prevent the violent deaths the sport has come to accept.
BUSINESS
July 9, 1993 | Michael Flagg / Times staff writer
It has been two years since the Injury and Illness Prevention Act--better known as SB 198--became law. It says that if you run a business, you must have a written plan to prevent injuries and illness in your workplace. But many small businesses haven't bothered to write up such a plan, says a dean at UC Irvine. With a $200,000 grant, Daniel Stokols at the School of Social Ecology will now study ways of coaxing those businesses to comply.
NEWS
December 5, 1991 | ROXANA KOPETMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Long Beach Police Department--where virtually every patrol car was involved in a traffic accident during the last fiscal year--is considering a driver awareness program to improve a collision record that cost the city $147,000 in damages, according to a department memo. The department, which has 101 black-and-white cruisers, reported 155 collisions--about 1 1/2 accidents per car. More than half of those could have been prevented, said the Nov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2008 | Jennifer Oldham, Times Staff Writer
As an American Airlines jet readied for takeoff on the runway at this city's airport recently, red lights embedded in the pavement at intersecting taxiways down the field blinked on, warning other aircraft to stay clear. Air traffic controllers watched from the tower as the slender silver MD-80 started rolling down the runway, gaining speed on its way to Dallas. Once it was safe, the red lights clicked off.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2007 | Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writer
The acting chief of the Federal Aviation Administration said Monday that the two north runways at LAX need to be reconfigured to lessen the chances of collisions between aircraft on the ground. "In general we're happy with the way that the south airfield is going" at Los Angeles International Airport, said Bobby Sturgell, acting FAA administrator, referring to the current reworking of the runways on the facility's south side. "We'd like to see something done on the north side. . . .
WORLD
July 21, 2007 | Reed Johnson, Times Staff Writer
For months, Brazilians have been using the phrase "air blackout" to describe the crisis in the country's aviation system that reached epic proportions this week with the worst crash in the nation's history. The use of this phrase is no accident.
NEWS
June 10, 2007 | Malcolm Ritter, Associated Press
Richard Grove, 73 years old and a robust 6 feet tall, set out with confident strides across a laboratory floor the other day. His first five steps went great. Then his left foot hit a slippery patch and skidded. His arms windmilled over his head as if he were throwing a baseball with each hand. His right foot shot forward to come even with his left. But he quickly regained his balance and kept on walking. This was no accident. Grove had just slipped for science.
NATIONAL
May 19, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Operators of underground coal mines will be required to take far stronger action to prevent explosions like the one that killed 12 men at the Sago Mine last year, under new rules issued by the federal Mine Safety and Health Administration. The rules, which take effect Tuesday, follow the agency's conclusion that lightning sparked methane gas in a sealed section of the West Virginia mine.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The government plans to issue requirements next month that new vehicles include anti-rollover technology, officials said Thursday. Nicole Nason, administrator of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, told a congressional budget panel that electronic stability control technology would be mandated on all new passenger vehicles by 2011.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1993 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly a year after Woodland Hills teen-ager Adam Bischoff drowned in the storm-swollen Los Angeles River, city and county officials on Wednesday unveiled a program for Los Angeles County schools aimed at preventing children from dying in flood-control channels.
NEWS
September 2, 1992 | YVONNE SHINHOSTER LAMB, THE WASHINGTON POST
Dana Carr Balchunas sat on the floor in a Washington row house, a stuffed suitcase within easy reach and two babies crawling nearby. Two couples and their child-care providers, seated around the family room, listened intently as she talked. When one of the infants grabbed a small toy with beads, Balchunas seized the opportunity to drive home a point. That toy, she stressed, is an accident waiting to happen.
HEALTH
December 18, 2006 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
Anti-drunk driving devices in cars may still be a decade away. But the net is expected to continue to tighten around drunk drivers, says Chris Murphy, director of the California Office of Traffic Safety. "At the state level, we are doing more than ever," he says. "We're not resting until this issue is reversed, until these numbers turn around. We are funding new and exciting programs designed to save lives."
BUSINESS
June 13, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Ten thousand fatal automobile crashes a year, or nearly one-third of such accidents in the U.S., could be prevented if more vehicles were equipped with technology that helps to keep them from rolling over, the insurance industry says in a study released today. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety said the technology, electronic stability control, reduced the risk of single-vehicle rollovers involving sport utility vehicles by 80%, and by 77% for passenger cars.
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