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Accidental Death

NEWS
April 16, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II / For the Booster Shots blog
Death rates from unintentional injuries of children from birth to age 19 fell by nearly 30% in the United States from 2000 through 2009, largely because of a 41% drop in deaths in car crashes, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Monday. That amounts to more than 11,000 children saved during the decade, Dr. Ileana Arias, principal deputy director of the CDC, said in a news conference. "The rate is among the worst of all high-income countries," she said, and the real shame is that most of the deaths "are predictable and preventable.
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NATIONAL
February 28, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
Philip Seymour Hoffman, who won the hearts of fans and fellow actors during decades of an award-winning career, accidentally died of a deadly mix of drugs, New York medical officials announced Friday. The office of New York's chief medical examiner said that Hoffman had died from "acute mixed drug intoxication" from substances including heroin, cocaine, benzodiazepines and amphetamines. His body was found Feb. 2 in his apartment in Manhattan's West Village. Police have said that Hoffman was found with a needle in his arm and at least 50 packets containing heroin in the apartment.
BUSINESS
November 9, 1996 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An outbreak of E. coli illness linked to a California company's unpasteurized apple juice claimed its first fatality Friday with the death of a 15-month-old Colorado girl. Anna Gimmestad, an only child, died at Children's Hospital in Denver after a two-week battle with kidney failure, known to be a complication of an especially virulent bacterial strain known as E. coli O157:H7. The child's parents, from Greeley, Colo., said the child had consumed fruit "smoothies" made by Odwalla Inc.
NEWS
August 19, 1988 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
The California Supreme Court, refusing to extend unmarried cohabitants a right that the law grants to married couples, Thursday barred a single man from suing for the negligence-related accidental death of his live-in girlfriend. The justices, in a 6-1 decision, rejected a suit for emotional distress and loss of companionship brought by Richard C. Elden, who survived a car crash that took the life of his companion, Linda Eberling, in Pasadena in 1982.
NEWS
July 7, 1988 | GLENN F. BUNTING, Times Staff Writer
Police officials in Seattle are reviewing the 1968 death of the second wife of Melvyn R. Paisley, the former assistant Navy secretary who is a central figure in the nationwide Pentagon contract scandal. The case is being reopened by the King County Police Department after a review of coroner's records and phone calls from several witnesses who want to talk to detectives, said Maj. Terry Allman, head of criminal investigations. "The red flags just popped up," Allman said.
OPINION
October 26, 1997 | EUGENE J. CARROLL Jr., Retired Rear Adm. Eugene J. Carroll Jr. is deputy director of the Center for Defense Information in Washington
The midair collision of two military aircraft over Edwards Air Force base on Wednesday continues a disturbing series of crashes that began in September. In just over a month, the losses total 18 lives and 10 planes. These accidents involved aircraft from three services operating different models while performing widely different missions. They occurred in locations stretching 10,000 miles from California to Africa to the Persian Gulf.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1994
Regarding Calendar's coverage of the top stories of 1993 (Dec. 26): Part of the problem of Beavis and Butt-head's influence on children has been overlooked: the fallacious notion of the populace (adults and children alike) that all animated films and programs are for juveniles ("The Guys Who Drove a Bigger Wedge Between the Generations," by Chris Willman). Many creations have used cartooning to create something of artistic or literary merit with adult themes: "Wait Till Your Father Gets Home," "Heavy Metal," "Fantasia," "American Pop," "The Simpsons."
NATIONAL
October 31, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
A federal prosecutor in Georgia has opened a formal review into what local officials ruled was the accidental death of a teenager, found dead and wrapped in a wrestling mat in his high school gymnasium. The latest step in the case of Kendrick Johnson was announced Thursday by Michael Moore, the U.S. attorney for the Middle District of Georgia at a news conference in his office in Macon. Johnson's parents and lawyers have questioned the official ruling that the high school student died in an accident and had a private autopsy done that supported the possibility of foul play.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2012 | By Richard Winton and Harriet Ryan, Los Angeles Times
Summoned to a couple's Woodland Hills condominium last spring, police officers heard a sad but familiar tale. The wife, an active 70-year-old, said she had come home from a tennis match to find her husband of five decades dead in his bed. He was 80, diabetic and suffered from high blood pressure, she told them. Officers consoled the woman and arranged for the body to be sent to a funeral home. But three days later, on the eve of his cremation, a perfunctory check at the mortuary triggered a series of stunning revelations: The man had been beaten to death, the murder weapon was a coffee cup from the kitchen, and the prime suspect was his widow.
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