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Accidental Death

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2012 | By Richard Winton and Andrew Blankstein, Los Angeles Times
Two decidedly different portraits emerged Wednesday of the U.S. Open tennis umpire accused of killing her 80-year-old husband and then trying to pass it off as an accident. Prosecutors said Lois Goodman, 70, bludgeoned her husband, then callously left him to die as she went to "tennis and to get her nails done. " Deputy Dist. Atty. Sharon Ransom accused Lois Goodman of meticulously planning the killing in advance, but did not lay out any evidence to support that claim. She said the umpire used a broken coffee mug like an "improvised knife," stabbing her husband 10 times.
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NATIONAL
February 28, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
Philip Seymour Hoffman, who won the hearts of fans and fellow actors during decades of an award-winning career, accidentally died of a deadly mix of drugs, New York medical officials announced Friday. The office of New York's chief medical examiner said that Hoffman had died from "acute mixed drug intoxication" from substances including heroin, cocaine, benzodiazepines and amphetamines. His body was found Feb. 2 in his apartment in Manhattan's West Village. Police have said that Hoffman was found with a needle in his arm and at least 50 packets containing heroin in the apartment.
OPINION
January 15, 2013 | By Michael Shermer
President Obama has vowed to do everything in his power to prevent another Sandy Hook. "Because what choice do we have?" he asked. "We can't accept events like this as routine. " Unfortunately, such events are far more random than they are routine. They are what the statistician Nassim Taleb calls "Black Swan events": improbable, rare and unpredictable. We will never be able to prevent them. But that does not mean we can do nothing in response. We should start by understanding the distinction between murder and mass murder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2012 | By Kim Christensen, Los Angeles Times
Criminal proceedings against UCLA chemistry professor Patrick Harran took a bizarre turn Thursday when the defense alleged in court papers that the state's chief investigator in the accidental death of a lab worker committed murder as a teenager in 1985. The investigator, Brian Baudendistel, denied it. "It's not true," he told The Times earlier this week. "Look, it's not me. " Baudendistel, a senior special investigator for the California Division of Occupational Safety and Health, was instrumental in building the criminal case against Harran and UCLA with a 95-page report that blamed both in the death of 23-year-old Sheharbano "Sheri" Sangji.
BUSINESS
November 9, 1996 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An outbreak of E. coli illness linked to a California company's unpasteurized apple juice claimed its first fatality Friday with the death of a 15-month-old Colorado girl. Anna Gimmestad, an only child, died at Children's Hospital in Denver after a two-week battle with kidney failure, known to be a complication of an especially virulent bacterial strain known as E. coli O157:H7. The child's parents, from Greeley, Colo., said the child had consumed fruit "smoothies" made by Odwalla Inc.
NEWS
August 19, 1988 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
The California Supreme Court, refusing to extend unmarried cohabitants a right that the law grants to married couples, Thursday barred a single man from suing for the negligence-related accidental death of his live-in girlfriend. The justices, in a 6-1 decision, rejected a suit for emotional distress and loss of companionship brought by Richard C. Elden, who survived a car crash that took the life of his companion, Linda Eberling, in Pasadena in 1982.
NEWS
July 7, 1988 | GLENN F. BUNTING, Times Staff Writer
Police officials in Seattle are reviewing the 1968 death of the second wife of Melvyn R. Paisley, the former assistant Navy secretary who is a central figure in the nationwide Pentagon contract scandal. The case is being reopened by the King County Police Department after a review of coroner's records and phone calls from several witnesses who want to talk to detectives, said Maj. Terry Allman, head of criminal investigations. "The red flags just popped up," Allman said.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1994
Regarding Calendar's coverage of the top stories of 1993 (Dec. 26): Part of the problem of Beavis and Butt-head's influence on children has been overlooked: the fallacious notion of the populace (adults and children alike) that all animated films and programs are for juveniles ("The Guys Who Drove a Bigger Wedge Between the Generations," by Chris Willman). Many creations have used cartooning to create something of artistic or literary merit with adult themes: "Wait Till Your Father Gets Home," "Heavy Metal," "Fantasia," "American Pop," "The Simpsons."
OPINION
October 26, 1997 | EUGENE J. CARROLL Jr., Retired Rear Adm. Eugene J. Carroll Jr. is deputy director of the Center for Defense Information in Washington
The midair collision of two military aircraft over Edwards Air Force base on Wednesday continues a disturbing series of crashes that began in September. In just over a month, the losses total 18 lives and 10 planes. These accidents involved aircraft from three services operating different models while performing widely different missions. They occurred in locations stretching 10,000 miles from California to Africa to the Persian Gulf.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
A tragedy devastating to experience can feel generic when transferred to the screen, and that, despite everyone's best intentions and an outstanding performance by Nicole Kidman, is what happens with "Rabbit Hole. " Screenwriter David Lindsay-Abaire's play about a married couple trying to cope with the accidental death of their 4-year-old son was nominated for five Tonys and won the Pulitzer Prize in 2007, and it's likely that the intensity and intimacy of the theatrical experience was a factor in its success.
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