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Accreditation

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 2012 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
A national accrediting agency has approved UC Riverside's long-embattled plan to open a full medical school and to start enrolling future doctors next summer, officials announced Tuesday. It would be the sixth medical school in the University of California system and the first to open since the late 1960s. Last year, the same panel rejected the proposal because it looked too risky after the state refused to fund the school. But UC Riverside officials have since secured enough other public and private financing for a program that they say will help ease a doctor shortage in the Inland Empire and improve public healthcare there.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2012 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - Officials at City College of San Francisco will unveil a tough blueprint for survival Thursday that will include an increased focus on moving students through the two-year school, a more centralized approach to finances and closing campuses. The state's largest community college prepared the detailed report in response to scathing findings by the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges earlier this summer that placed its future in jeopardy. To emerge from the crisis, by next spring the college must justify its right to exist - an uncommon status known as "show cause" that falls one step shy of losing accreditation.
BUSINESS
August 25, 2012 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
An independent accreditation group has told two outpatient clinics affiliated with the once-prominent 1-800-GET-THIN Lap-Band surgery advertising campaign to make specified improvements or potentially lose their accreditation. The Joint Commission, one of a handful of organizations authorized by California to accredit the state's outpatient surgery centers, issued "requirements for improvement" to New Life Surgery Center in Beverly Hills and Valley Surgical Center in West Hills after inspecting the facilities in May and again this month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2012 | By Geoff Boucher, Los Angeles Times
Joe Kubert was never a superstar comics artist - his work didn't have the necessary bombast or polished edges - but the man who drew ragged, soulful soldiers in "Sgt. Rock," "The Haunted Tank" and "Enemy Ace" did something his characters would have admired: Kubert marched farther and longer than anyone else and proved himself a natural leader. Kubert, 85, who died Sunday in Morristown, N.J., of multiple myeloma, leaves behind a legacy spread across comic books published in eight decades and built into the walls of the Kubert School.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2012 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
UC Riverside's long-held dream to have a full medical school was badly battered last year when the state refused to pay for it and then national accreditors wouldn't allow it to open. Those denials were a blow to the UC system's proud tradition of adding campuses and programs to serve a growing state. Now, UC Riverside is making what national experts say is a rare second attempt to gain approval for a medical school. Campus officials say they have obtained alternative financial backing, worth about $10 million a year for a decade, from private donors, local government and the UC system in hopes that the medical school can enroll its first 50 students in fall 2013.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 2012 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - The report this month from the accreditation commission was scathing. It found that City College of San Francisco - at 90,000 students, the largest community college in the state and one of the largest in the nation - was riddled with problems, including paltry financial reserves, a dearth of leadership and a slow-moving style of democratic governance. The 77-year-old school now must make a case for continuing to exist and craft a closure plan in case the onerous task of reform fails.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2012 | Rosanna Xia
After filing 400 stories from China, reporter Melissa Chan never thought she'd wind up in the headlines herself. Chan returned to Southern California last week as the first accredited foreign correspondent to be expelled from China in 14 years, an act that sparked a flurry of news reports and expressions of solidarity from fellow journalists. Chan, who was the sole Al Jazeera English correspondent in China, said she knew she was on shaky ground for most of this year. She had been working on month-by-month credentials since January, when the government refused a routine visa-renewal request.
BUSINESS
September 28, 2011 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
Outpatient surgery centers, including those that perform weight-loss procedures after which five Southern California patients have died, could face additional scrutiny under a bill pending before Gov. Jerry Brown. Both houses of the state Legislature have approved a bill that would reshape laws governing clinics such as Valley Surgical Center, where Paula Rojeski underwent Lap-Band surgery before her Sept. 8 death. Brown has until Oct. 9 to make a decision on the bill. A spokesman for the governor declined to comment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2011 | By Maria L. LaGanga and Dan Weikel, Los Angeles Times
Cheryle and Ernest Chin were anxious about getting home to Australia, and American Airlines wasn't making it easy. The massage therapist and her real estate developer husband had started out three days earlier in Brazil; they were still thousands of miles away, and the shortest flight of their multicontinent odyssey had just been canceled — San Francisco to Los Angeles. Photos: San Francisco International But for two people on a forced seven-hour layover, the Chins looked remarkably relaxed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2011 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
Plans to open a medical school at UC Riverside next year appeared uncertain Wednesday after officials announced that the school had been denied initial accreditation because of concerns about the cash-strapped state's ability to provide funding. The first 50 students were expected to enroll next summer at the medical school, which would be the sixth in the UC system. The school, approved by UC regents in 2008, is intended to ease a physician shortage in the Inland Empire area and to bolster UC Riverside's academic reputation.
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