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Acid Reflux

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NEWS
August 23, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
A welter of medications sold over the counter and by prescription can spell fast relief from the churning discomfort of acid reflux and heartburn, and the class of drugs known as proton-pump inhibitors has grown powerfully popular with Americans. But the watchdog group Public Citizen on Tuesday asked the U.S. Food & Drug Administration to warn Americans that these drugs can be habit-forming and carry a wide range of other dangers. Public Citizen complained that medications known by such commercial names as Nexium, Prilosec, Zegerid and Prevacid are widely overprescribed and used routinely by people who don't need them.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
October 24, 2013
Re "The no-pills, no-frills cure for heartburn," Opinion, Oct. 20 I commend Dr. Michael P. Jones for his clear and upfront presentation of acid reflux, its causes and treatments. I found it particularly powerful that he himself has suffered from this problem and has found that the most effective, non-pharmaceutical way to deal with it is to put down the fork and exercise. Just imagine if other medical problems were handled this way - less expensively yet effectively. His closing paragraph says it all: "The healthcare crisis is largely self-inflicted....
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HEALTH
July 20, 2009 | Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon
My doctor just prescribed Prevacid for acid reflux. I am reluctant to take this medicine because I have heard it might lead to weakened bones. I already have severe osteoporosis because of a lengthy course of cortisone. This drug caused significant bone loss, so I am now taking Fosamax. I would hate to undo the benefits I have gotten on Fosamax, but the drug does cause bad heartburn. I feel caught in a dilemma. A surprising number of medicines have a negative effect on bone density.
SCIENCE
September 25, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Paul Karason, the man with blue skin and white beard, died this week. He was 62. Karason was being treated for pneumonia at the time of his death, and had also recently suffered a heart attack and a stroke, according to a  report on Today.com . The world was first introduced to Karason and his blue-gray skin in 2008, when he went on the "Today" show to discuss his condition, known as argyria.   At that time, the man who came to be known by many as a real-life Papa Smurf said he had been living with blue skin for at least 10 years.
HEALTH
September 20, 2004 | Valerie Reitman, Times Staff Writer
Heartburn, indigestion, ulcers and other gastric disorders affect 1 in every 20 people, and U.S. patients fork over more money for treatment -- about $13 billion every year for prescription drugs -- than for almost any other type of medication. But easing the symptoms can take time. The pills' thick coatings -- necessary so the medication isn't destroyed by the stomach's powerful acids -- delay the drugs' absorption until they get to the intestine. Now a low-tech discovery happened upon by a university pharmacologist has led to the reformulation of some of the gastric reflux drugs with baking soda.
HEALTH
April 19, 2004 | Judy Foreman, Special to The Times
You get home from work late with a pepperoni pizza in your arms. You sit down, shake some chili pepper flakes onto the pizza and begin to indulge, washing down the pizza with a beer or two. Perhaps you top it off with a cup of coffee. It's late, and so you head to bed. Bad move. You may pay for your late-night indulgence, waking up in the wee hours with heartburn, the hallmark of acid reflux, or what doctors call GERD, gastroesophageal reflux disease. Your biggest mistake?
HEALTH
August 16, 1999 | JANE E. ALLEN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Heartburn. That deep, irritating sensation that creeps from your stomach toward your neck, creating pressure and leaving a nasty acid taste in the back of your throat. More than 60 million Americans report paying the price for overindulging in fatty or spicy food with heartburn symptoms at least once a month. Most don't give it much thought.
SCIENCE
September 25, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Paul Karason, the man with blue skin and white beard, died this week. He was 62. Karason was being treated for pneumonia at the time of his death, and had also recently suffered a heart attack and a stroke, according to a  report on Today.com . The world was first introduced to Karason and his blue-gray skin in 2008, when he went on the "Today" show to discuss his condition, known as argyria.   At that time, the man who came to be known by many as a real-life Papa Smurf said he had been living with blue skin for at least 10 years.
HEALTH
October 13, 2008
Thank you for your piece on the rise of acid reflux disease in America ["Gut Check for Reflux," Oct. 6]. Just a look around confirms what the study you cite says: Americans are becoming increasingly afflicted with acid reflux. I began to suffer from it at the age of 22, and several of my friends did shortly thereafter. What bothers me about all of the research on acid reflux (and other illnesses) is our national obsession with obesity. Virtually every medical study I see attributes another trend to fat people, and I think it's a cop-out.
NATIONAL
October 18, 2005 | From Reuters
A type of surgery to treat acid reflux disease, a chronic cause of heartburn, is showing a high degree of long-term success, according to a study published Monday. Of 1,340 people who underwent a laparoscopic procedure, in which a small tube is inserted into the abdomen, 93% said they were satisfied with the long-term results. Patients in the study, conducted at University Hospital in Angers, France, were followed on average for more than seven years after the surgery.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Lindsay Lohan is addicted to alcohol but not to cocaine, though she did use cocaine more often than she's admitted in the past because it allowed her to drink more alcohol. You get the picture. Oh, she's also off Adderall, which she used to think grounded her, and has never injected anything stronger than a B12 shot. But she takes Nexium because she has acid reflux. Admit it: If you were Lindsay Lohan, you'd probably have acid reflux too, because girlfriend said she's also addicted to chaos, something she picked up early in life.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2013 | By Nardine Saad
Busy Philipps has announced that she's having another girl. The pregnant "Cougar Town" actress is expecting a second child with husband Marc Silverstein, which she originally announced on Twitter in December.  "We've known for a long time now, I just haven't had any reason to say it , but we're having another girl. We're really excited," she told The Huffington Post . PHOTOS: Hollywood baby boom The 33-year-old opened up about her pregnancy at the premiere of "A Case of You" at the Tribeca Film Festival in New York on Sunday.
HEALTH
September 1, 2012 | Karen Ravn
Pillows. They're not just for nestling your noggin anymore. They're also for keeping your stiff neck from aching, your sinuses from congesting, your acids from refluxing, your snores from snorting, your tinnitus from tintinnabulating and -- yes! glory be! -- your face from turning into a prune. Or, so go some of the claims. Here's a heads-up on how well the hype holds up. -- Pressure points Laying your head on a bunch of pointy spikes may not sound especially therapeutic.
NEWS
August 23, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
A welter of medications sold over the counter and by prescription can spell fast relief from the churning discomfort of acid reflux and heartburn, and the class of drugs known as proton-pump inhibitors has grown powerfully popular with Americans. But the watchdog group Public Citizen on Tuesday asked the U.S. Food & Drug Administration to warn Americans that these drugs can be habit-forming and carry a wide range of other dangers. Public Citizen complained that medications known by such commercial names as Nexium, Prilosec, Zegerid and Prevacid are widely overprescribed and used routinely by people who don't need them.
HEALTH
December 28, 2009 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
I suffered from cluster headaches for 14 years. Some doctors said the pain was psychosomatic. Others told me I was allergic to chocolate. Doctors prescribed Demerol for the pain, and I became dependent on this narcotic. I eventually kicked the habit. Then I quit smoking. Within a week my headaches stopped. They only return when I am in a room with a smoker. Cluster headaches are sometimes called suicide headaches because the pain can be so severe. It tends to occur on one side of the face, near the eye. The pain can last several hours and recurs in clusters for weeks or months at a time.
HEALTH
July 20, 2009 | Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon
My doctor just prescribed Prevacid for acid reflux. I am reluctant to take this medicine because I have heard it might lead to weakened bones. I already have severe osteoporosis because of a lengthy course of cortisone. This drug caused significant bone loss, so I am now taking Fosamax. I would hate to undo the benefits I have gotten on Fosamax, but the drug does cause bad heartburn. I feel caught in a dilemma. A surprising number of medicines have a negative effect on bone density.
SCIENCE
August 4, 2007 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Elderly African Americans who are chronic users of acidinhibiting medications in the family that includes Zantac, Pepcid and Tagamet have 2 1/2 times the normal risk of developing dementia, Indiana researchers reported Friday. The drugs block production of stomach acid by inhibiting so-called histamine-2 receptors; a pump in the stomach releases hydrochloric acid when stimulated by histamines. But they also inhibit the brain's cholinergic system, which is involved in memory and cognition.
HEALTH
December 28, 2009 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
I suffered from cluster headaches for 14 years. Some doctors said the pain was psychosomatic. Others told me I was allergic to chocolate. Doctors prescribed Demerol for the pain, and I became dependent on this narcotic. I eventually kicked the habit. Then I quit smoking. Within a week my headaches stopped. They only return when I am in a room with a smoker. Cluster headaches are sometimes called suicide headaches because the pain can be so severe. It tends to occur on one side of the face, near the eye. The pain can last several hours and recurs in clusters for weeks or months at a time.
HEALTH
October 13, 2008
Thank you for your piece on the rise of acid reflux disease in America ["Gut Check for Reflux," Oct. 6]. Just a look around confirms what the study you cite says: Americans are becoming increasingly afflicted with acid reflux. I began to suffer from it at the age of 22, and several of my friends did shortly thereafter. What bothers me about all of the research on acid reflux (and other illnesses) is our national obsession with obesity. Virtually every medical study I see attributes another trend to fat people, and I think it's a cop-out.
HEALTH
October 6, 2008 | Tammy Worth, Special to The Times
It WAS 1972 when a visibly uncomfortable man leaned over the side of his bed bemoaning his indulgence with the phrase, "I can't believe I ate the whole thing." This Alka-Seltzer commercial was an early and memorable marketing effort to show how a simple pill could ease the pain of gluttons everywhere. And it was just a hint of what was to come. More than 35 years of plop, plops and fizz, fizzes later, Americans have hardly learned their lesson.
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