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Acid

HEALTH
October 26, 2013 | By Chris Woolston
In cookbooks, health food stores and alternative health clinics, the word is getting out: Acid is the latest dietary villain. It's not necessarily the acid in foods like tomatoes and lemons that supposedly cause the trouble. Instead, a growing number of people claim that meats, wheat, soda, coffee, alcohol and processed foods of all sorts produce acid in the body after they've been digested. The acid, in turn, is said to fuel health problems including arthritis, obesity and cancer.
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NEWS
February 9, 1986 | Associated Press
A University of California chemist believes the root bark of an African tree may provide a method of birth control for cockroaches. Isao Kubo hopes that lacing roach food with a chemical called anacardic acid, found in the bark of the msimbwi tree, could be the answer. "If we can feed it to them, it's a new way of control," he said before presenting his findings recently in Miami Beach to a meeting to the American Chemical Society.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Albert Hofmann, the Swiss chemist who discovered LSD and thereby gave the psychedelic generation the pharmaceutical vehicle to turn on, tune in and drop out, has died. He was 102. Hofmann died Tuesday morning at his home in Basel, Switzerland, of a heart attack, according to Rick Doblin, the head of MAPS, the Multidisciplinary Assn. for Psychedelic Studies. Hofmann also identified and synthesized the active ingredients of peyote mushrooms and a Mexican psychoactive plant called ololiuqui and developed at least three related, non-psychoactive compounds that became widely used in medicine.
MAGAZINE
August 2, 1992
If each vehicle is to carry 32 10-volt battery packs, how about the disposal of lead acid in the batteries? That's 32 gallons of it per vehicle to be discarded each year. If California's 20 million vehicles produced 640 million gallons of non-recyclable waste annually, would it be poured into the ocean or allowed to sink into the soil? RON OEHLKERS Venice Marla Cone responds: Lead acid in batteries is recycled, so there should be no significant disposal problem.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | Associated Press
Five members of the environmentalist group Greenpeace scaled Mt. Rushmore today as part of a campaign against acid rain, and an eyewitness said three were taken into custody. All five were arrested while trying to unfurl a large banner.
SCIENCE
September 24, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Cancer researchers at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C., have been studying the DNA in tumors called glioblastomas - hoping, ultimately, to help find a cure for the disease.   They haven't found that yet, but they may have come across something else scientists are seeking: an enzyme that could help companies make nylon without depending on fossil fuels. Duke researcher Zachary Reitman and colleagues reported Sunday in the journal Nature Chemical Biology that inserting glioblastoma genes into yeast allowed them to make an enzyme called 2-hydroxyadipate dehydrogenase - a molecule chemists need to make adipic acid, a key ingredient in nylon, from sugar.  Today, adipic acid, which is produced in vast quantities, is made using petroleum products.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
It's another round of legal woes for the Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow: One of its top dancers is suing the company to annul two reprimands he received for talking to the media. Following an acid attack on the Bolshoi's artistic director, Segei Filin, Nikolai Tsiskaridze, 39, publicly criticized the company's general director and called for the removal of theater executives. The Georgian-born dancer petitioned a Moscow court Tuesday to annul the reprimands, which could lead to his dismissal.
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