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Acid

NEWS
December 20, 2010 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
Move over, omega-3s . There's a new fatty acid in town that might make you healthier. Something more closely associated with creamy pleasure than with fish burps. Trans-palmitoleic acid, a fatty acid that circulates at higher levels in the blood of those who consume lots of full-fat dairy products, may protect against diabetes, according to a study published Monday in the Annals of Internal Medicine . That surprising finding may fly in the face of much nutritional advice that warns us against consuming too much whole milk, cheese or other sources of animal fat. But it comes from a study of 3,736 adults participating in the long-running Cardiovascular Health Study . It also proceeds from a suspicion that researchers have had for a while, but found difficult to prove: that the fatty acid palmitoleate, which humans produce in their liver and fat, and consume in dairy fats, may play a complex role -- beneficial and harmful -- in regulating metabolism . By measuring just the palmitoleate that came from consumption of dairy fats, researchers were able to discern the side of this fatty acid that may contribute to good health.
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HEALTH
October 26, 2013 | By Chris Woolston
In cookbooks, health food stores and alternative health clinics, the word is getting out: Acid is the latest dietary villain. It's not necessarily the acid in foods like tomatoes and lemons that supposedly cause the trouble. Instead, a growing number of people claim that meats, wheat, soda, coffee, alcohol and processed foods of all sorts produce acid in the body after they've been digested. The acid, in turn, is said to fuel health problems including arthritis, obesity and cancer.
NEWS
February 9, 1986 | Associated Press
A University of California chemist believes the root bark of an African tree may provide a method of birth control for cockroaches. Isao Kubo hopes that lacing roach food with a chemical called anacardic acid, found in the bark of the msimbwi tree, could be the answer. "If we can feed it to them, it's a new way of control," he said before presenting his findings recently in Miami Beach to a meeting to the American Chemical Society.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Albert Hofmann, the Swiss chemist who discovered LSD and thereby gave the psychedelic generation the pharmaceutical vehicle to turn on, tune in and drop out, has died. He was 102. Hofmann died Tuesday morning at his home in Basel, Switzerland, of a heart attack, according to Rick Doblin, the head of MAPS, the Multidisciplinary Assn. for Psychedelic Studies. Hofmann also identified and synthesized the active ingredients of peyote mushrooms and a Mexican psychoactive plant called ololiuqui and developed at least three related, non-psychoactive compounds that became widely used in medicine.
MAGAZINE
August 2, 1992
If each vehicle is to carry 32 10-volt battery packs, how about the disposal of lead acid in the batteries? That's 32 gallons of it per vehicle to be discarded each year. If California's 20 million vehicles produced 640 million gallons of non-recyclable waste annually, would it be poured into the ocean or allowed to sink into the soil? RON OEHLKERS Venice Marla Cone responds: Lead acid in batteries is recycled, so there should be no significant disposal problem.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | Associated Press
Five members of the environmentalist group Greenpeace scaled Mt. Rushmore today as part of a campaign against acid rain, and an eyewitness said three were taken into custody. All five were arrested while trying to unfurl a large banner.
MAGAZINE
June 4, 1989 | PADDY CALISTRO
SOME CALL them kinky. Some say they stink. And others just plain hate them. Yet 80% of salon patrons won't face their mirrors without a perm. According to Modern Salon, a hair-care industry trade journal, permanent waves are the second-most-requested service after haircuts in U.S. beauty shops. Despite the proliferation of gels, mousses and curling tools, perms remain popular because of the long-lasting body, versatility and wash-and-wear convenience they provide. Reacting to the public's love-hate relationship with the perm, manufacturers and stylists are in constant pursuit of the perfect wave.
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