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June 15, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A 1964 acoustic guitar from the collection of English classical guitarist Julian Bream has been sold for $26,100, a world auction record for the instrument, Sotheby's said. The guitar, made by Robert Bouchet in Paris, was bought Thursday by a Japanese dealer whose name was not available. The previous record was $18,900 paid in 1974 for a south German guitar made in 1624. Bream has said he plays his guitars for two years and then likes to sell them for others to play.
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SPORTS
October 25, 2013 | Eric Sondheimer
To hear the soothing, spiritual sounds coming from 17-year-old Cameron Griffin's acoustic guitar as he gently plucks its strings leaves a visitor feeling as if he has been transported to a sandy beach at sunset amid cool, refreshing waves. Then, seeing a video of the 6-foot-3, 215-pound Griffin sending a ballcarrier crashing to the ground adds to the intrigue of a teenager who's clearly a savant of sorts. How else to explain someone who took up the guitar seven years ago and taught himself to play by listening to music, then became a football standout only after going out for the team as a freshman at Los Angeles View Park Prep and learning how to play by listening to his coaches.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2004
Robert Hilburn's U2 piece, "Where Craft Ends and Spirit Begins" [Aug. 8], was wonderful. I thoroughly enjoyed it. It was inspirational, informative and great. Good work. Paul Zollo North Hollywood Paul Zollo was the managing editor of Performing Songwriter magazine, has written for Musician and Acoustic Guitar, and is the author of "Songwriters on Songwriting."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
This post has been corrected. See below for details. Though unassuming, the kitchen clock onstage near Willie Nelson's amplifier at the Hollywood Bowl was the perfect prop. The Texas singer on Friday night delivered the entirety of his 1978 album of classic ballads, "Stardust," and the second hand circled, chronicling the moments while elegantly crafted lines and melodies, as pure as a perfect haiku, drifted into the crowd. "Funny how time slips away," he observed in his self-penned classic of the same name.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1996 | Sandy Masuo and New albums are rated on a scale of one star (poor), two stars (fair), three stars (good) and four stars (excellent). and * TimesLine 808-8463 and To hear excerpts from the albums reviewed, call TimesLine and press * and the artist's corresponding four-digit code. and Skinny Puppy *5714 and In 805 area code, call (818) 808-8463.
The Canadian electronic-rock kingpins' final album is full of intriguing vagaries. Sound collage interludes surface between gloomy lulls and stretches of driving dance grooves, both choppy and smooth. Surprisingly, there's even a semi-unplugged track ("Candle") featuring a distortion-free vocal drifting between gentle acoustic guitar plucking and jagged guitar work. A suitably moody swan song.
NEWS
June 24, 1990 | Associated Press
Life imitated art at an auction Saturday when actor Gary Busey, who played Buddy Holly in a film biography, paid $242,000 for an acoustic guitar owned by the late rock 'n' roll pioneer. In addition to the 1945 Gibson guitar with a cover hand-tooled by Holly, the 118 lots in the sale included a Fender Stratocaster guitar that netted $110,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2012
MUSIC The Handsome Family may be the best country act that you've never heard on mainstream country radio. The husband-wife duo of Brett and Rennie Sparks specialize in the sort of dark, yet wryly funny tales that sound best backed by an acoustic guitar or a pedal steel twang. While albums such as 2000's "In the Air" put the group on the map with vivid songcraft, its most recent release "Scattered" puts songs by Bob Dylan, Leonard Cohen and the Beatles through the Handsome Family's warped lens.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM
McCabe's Guitar Shop of Long Beach (not to be confused with the more famous Santa Monica McCabe's) is launching a series of acoustic guitar concerts tonight at 8 with a performance by Laurence Juber, formerly lead guitarist of Paul McCartney's Wings. Tickets are $8.50. Owner Kurt Wheaton, who recently took over the shop at 4209 E. Anaheim St., says he hopes to stage monthly concerts in the guitar store, which can seat about 70 people.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2003 | Steve Appleford, Special to The Times
Ani DiFranco enjoys your company, but she still doesn't need any help. The singer-songwriter has worked with bands big and small and thrived while doing so. But at the Long Beach Terrace Theatre on Wednesday, she spent the evening alone onstage, filling the room with her acoustic guitar, typically breathless storytelling and sharp political wailing. DiFranco was a dancing, bobbing, weaving presence behind the microphone, dreadlocks hanging past her shoulders, and a playful host between songs.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1993 | ZAN STEWART
**** JOHN McLAUGHLIN "Time Remembered" Verve This is a gorgeous concept album. McLaughlin, the guitar terror whose steaming lines have driven such bands as the Mahavishnu Orchestra and Shakti, here slows way down, offering a unique celebration of the music of pianist Bill Evans.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
AUSTIN, Texas -- Below is a highly subjective list of bests and worsts of the South by Southwest music festival, which concluded Sunday after many thousands of performances over six packed days. Best fan/singer interaction: During the Austin punk band A Giant Dog's thrilling set of bare bones punk, the charismatic singer Sabrina Ellis complained about the heat. “Could you all blow on me?” she politely asked. The response from one subservient fan: “Yes, Lord!” Best Beatles cover: During a night celebrating 50 years of the Beatles, the Pyramids, which features  Tim Nordwind of  OK Go and charismatic singer  Drea Smith,  chose two gems from the white album.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Justin Timberlake's guest shot on NBC's “Saturday Night Live” over the weekend featured an encore performance of his current hit “Suit & Tie” with a lyric change that appeared to answer Kanye West's recent diss of his duet with Jay-Z. “My hit's so sick, got rappers acting dramatic,” Timberlake sang, an apparent comeback to West's comment about the song last month during a show in London, at which he told the audience, “I got love for Hova, but I ain't [expletive] with that 'Suit & Tie.'” His SNL gig was his fifth time hosting the show, a rare feat recognized in the opening skit in which Timberlake was awarded his membership in “The Five Timers Club,” described as “the most exclusive club in New York City.” IN CASE YOU MISSED IT: Grammys 2013 On entering an old-school drawing room, Timberlake was presented a smoking jacket emblazoned with a gold “5” and immediately ran into fellow club member Paul Simon strumming an acoustic guitar.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
It's impressive enough for a charismatic guy with a British accent, a pirate's hat and an acoustic guitar to bring a theater full of excited teenage girls to a frenzy of screams worthy of Justin Bieber or the Beatles, as Ed Sheeran did on Sunday night.  But at the Nokia Theatre on what the 22-year-old described as his biggest American gig to date (on his birthday, no less), Sheeran achieved a more amazing feat. Using a crowd control method he dubbed “the universal shush,” the supremely talented artist asked this hormonal mass to remain quiet for the softer songs.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2013 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
Downtown L.A.'s Staples Center may be home to the Grammys, but it's a relatively nondescript industrial complex in Burbank that's attracting some of the awards show's most notable nominees this week. Fender Musical Instruments' new artist showroom has become a hub for well-known musicians of all stripes. And with the Grammy Awards scheduled to air Sunday, business is brisk. Just as dress designers clamor to get their gowns on Oscar contenders, makers of musical equipment such as Fender are doing their best to get their newest products in the hands of Grammy-nominated pop stars.
NEWS
January 10, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
There are only a few times in our lives when we are presented with a choice so big that it will assuredly shape the experiences of every generation to follow. A choice that holds sway over the smallest of details in our children's cherished memories, and that of our chldren's children. This, ladies and gentleman, is one of those times. So please, for our future's sake, don't vote for the iron. In what is the biggest choice facing American consumers since voting to replace the tan M&M with the blue one in 1995, Hasbro is asking Monopoly fans to vote to keep their favorite piece in the current set. The lowest vote-getter will go directly to Monopoly jail, never to return.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2012 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
Guitarist Wayne Kramer's loud, fast and stripped-down rock 'n' roll paved the way for the Ramones, the Sex Pistols and the Clash - before he was sentenced to four years in prison for dealing drugs. Throughout his time behind bars, a guitar was an uncomplaining companion of the former frontman for the Detroit band MC5. On Tuesday, Kramer, who now composes music for television and films, and a group of fellow musicians visited the California Rehabilitation Center in Norco to perform a Christmas concert and donate 14 new Fender acoustic guitars to inmates.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1989 | Chris Willman
On her debut album last year, former folkie Etheridge moved mountains with a searing, electrifying voice that sounded like a rootsier, chancier version of Patty Smyth's husky rock howl. But that album's material was too samey, relentlessly presenting her as this wronged blues-mama with an eternal boulder on her shoulder: a Woman Who Loves Too Much going in for the melodramatic overkill.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2012 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Northern California-based guitarist Ben Chasny, whose band Six Organs of Admittance played a riff-heavy, meditative set at the Echo in Echo Park on Friday, travels difficult terrain. An artist whose work over the last decade has defied categorization, roaming in a world where acoustic folk meets metal, post-punk, prog rock, grunge, free jazz and mysticism, Chasny draws from genres and ideas whose excesses and pretensions are well documented.  When handling an acoustic guitar, he suggests '60s acoustic guitar instrumentalists such as John Fahey and Sandy Bull, whose obsessions with drone and harmonic overtones merged east and west with little regard for geography.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2012
MUSIC The Handsome Family may be the best country act that you've never heard on mainstream country radio. The husband-wife duo of Brett and Rennie Sparks specialize in the sort of dark, yet wryly funny tales that sound best backed by an acoustic guitar or a pedal steel twang. While albums such as 2000's "In the Air" put the group on the map with vivid songcraft, its most recent release "Scattered" puts songs by Bob Dylan, Leonard Cohen and the Beatles through the Handsome Family's warped lens.
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